Guest

Experimental Aviation

Sun Feb 28, 1999 3:55 pm

If you class your plane as Experimental (homebuilt) will you be able to charge people for rides in it i.e. lessons or corporate charter?
Iain
 
Cody
Posts: 2172
Joined: Tue May 18, 1999 12:16 pm

RE: Experimental Aviation

Sun Feb 28, 1999 11:53 pm

I don't think an experimental plane can be used for commercial operations.
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: Experimental Aviation

Mon Mar 01, 1999 4:06 am

NO.

They closest that you can get to getting paid in one is splitting the fuel costs with a buddy that you are flying with. The same restriction that you have on a private license.
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
Guest

RE: Then how

Mon Mar 01, 1999 5:07 am

I find this hard to believe. How do you learn to fly ultralights? You learn in a 2 seater that is classed as experimental. Like the MXII.
Iain
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

An ultralight is not an aircraft

Mon Mar 01, 1999 5:18 am

Technichally an ultralight is not an aircraft. In the US nither the Pilot nor the aircraft has to be licensed or registered. I can't remember the exact weight but I think the Max gross weight is 250lbs to be an ultralight. I think there is an additional couple of pounds allowed for a two seater.

As far as flight instructing is concerened I belive that it is a case of owner-supplied aircraft. If I happen to build say an experimental with a tailwheel I can hire a flight instructor to give lessons to get my tailwheel endorsement in that airplane. A flight instructor can't own an experimental aircraft and then look for students to instruct in it.

I hope this explains the diffenernce. Correctly.
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
Guest

RE: An ultralight is not an aircraft

Mon Mar 01, 1999 6:36 am

But a 2 seater training ultralight have to be registered and the instructor needs to have his PPL. I have seen aircraft like MXII and T-birds used for instruction is that against the law?
Iain
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: An ultralight is not an aircraft

Mon Mar 01, 1999 6:42 am

Was this in the US? The rules are different in other countries. I am probably going to have to look up Far Part 103. I know there are some aircraft out there that look like ultralights but don't meet the weight requirements. They are bumped into the experimental catagory.
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
Guest

RE: An ultralight is not an aircraft

Mon Mar 01, 1999 7:10 am

Yeah this is in the US. I have done some research on this and I am confused with your answer. It is not under FAR 103 as it has 2 seats and 9 gallons of fuel. It also is 400 pounds I think but it is heavier then FAR 103 allows.
Iain
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: An ultralight is not an aircraft

Mon Mar 01, 1999 8:05 am

I'm going to have to go with your numbers untill I look up part 103. Since I don't fly ultralight aircraft I am not as for up to speed on their regs as I should be
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: Experimental Aviation

Mon Mar 01, 1999 8:10 am

The other thing is that ultralights have their own dedicated set of rules FAR-103. Other homebuilts fall under the normal rules that everybody has to go by. Like I said in the earlier post I don't deal with the homebuilt rules at all so I am rusty on them. But I am pretty sure I was right about the flight instructing rules for homebuilts that are operating under the same rules as production aircraft.

The two need to be treated seperatly.
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.

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