dtw9
Posts: 894
Joined: Mon Sep 22, 2003 10:09 am

Aerial History Of DTW

Thu May 03, 2007 10:08 am

With the end of the Smith Terminal only a year or so away,I thought it would be interesting to see the development of Wayne County Airport into what is today Detroit Metro. The aerial photos are courtesy of DTE Energy donated to Wayne State University in Detroit. For all of you Detroiter's who would like to see the development of Southeast Michigan you can go to this link-http://tools.comm.wayne.edu/media/low_res/aerial_photos/index.htm

Hope you enjoy these,

1949 Aerial-http://techtools.culma.wayne.edu/media/wayne/1949/ha-16-117.pdf
1952 Aerial-http://techtools.culma.wayne.edu/media/wayne/1952/de-30-40.pdf
1956 Aerial-http://tools.comm.wayne.edu/media/low_res/aerial_photos/wayne/1956/ga-15-13.pdf
1961 Aerial-http://techtools.culma.wayne.edu/media/wayne/1961/fm-26-101.pdf
1967 Aerial-http://techtools.culma.wayne.edu/media/wayne/1967/4583-1396.pdf
1997 Aerial-http://tools.comm.wayne.edu/media/low_res/aerial_photos/wayne/1997/55739-30-34.pdf
 
 
dtw9
Posts: 894
Joined: Mon Sep 22, 2003 10:09 am

RE: Aerial History Of DTW

Thu May 03, 2007 10:23 am

Thanks PSU.DTW.SCE. I don't know why they didn't come up clickable
 
NASCARAirforce
Posts: 2452
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2005 7:27 am

RE: Aerial History Of DTW

Fri May 04, 2007 12:00 am

Thanks for posting. Too bad they didn't have pictures right after the Berry was built, and another one right after deregulation or after the Northwest/Republic Merger, then of course one from today to show how far they have come.

I didn't know that I-94 was there in 1949.
 
hjulicher
Posts: 656
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 2:26 pm

RE: Aerial History Of DTW

Fri May 04, 2007 12:41 am

I didn't know that DTW had so many runways in the 50's. It's still amazes me that the Smith Terminal is still up and standing when it was the original terminal built in the current spot.
LH 442
 
dtw9
Posts: 894
Joined: Mon Sep 22, 2003 10:09 am

RE: Aerial History Of DTW

Fri May 04, 2007 2:49 am

Quoting NASCARAirforce (Reply 3):
I didn't know that I-94 was there in 1949.

It wasn't. From Wikipedia


M-112 was the state highway designation given to segments of what is now Interstate 94 in the Metro Detroit area.

The 8.7 mile long "Willow Run Expressway" was completed in September 1942 to help workers in the Detroit area get to Willow Run on the eastern edge of Washtenaw County where the B-24 Liberator airplanes were made during the war. Built right next to the existing Chase Rd., it was hurriedly constructed after a change in construction priorities resulting from the bombing of Pearl Harbor in December 1941. It was built as a four-lane divided highway with some cross-road intersections, from Huron River Drive in western Romulus to US 112 on the west side of Willow Run via the Willow Run Bypass. Chase Rd. acted as the new service drive for the expressway. Prior to the United States entry into WWII, plans had been in the works to build a "Crosstown" highway through downtown Detroit into Macomb County which was built in the 1950s as the Edsel Ford Expressway.

From 1943 through 1945, the "Detroit Industrial Expressway" was built as a completely limited-access freeway from the eastern end of the Willow Run Expressway in Romulus first to Southfield Highway in Allen Park and then to US 112/Michigan Avenue (now US 12) near the boundary between Detroit and Dearborn.

Both the Willow Run and Detroit Industrial Expressways were designated as M-112, because it connected with US 112 on its eastern and western ends. All of M-112 was redesignated as US 12 in 1956, and the designation has not been used since. Beginning in 1958, the route was assimilated into the Interstate System as I-94. In the mid 1960s, the Willow Run Expressway was reconstructed to full Interstate standards, complete with full interchanges at Belleville and Haggerty Rds.

Some tri-level grade separation bridges were built as part of the Willow Run and Detroit Industrial Expressways that are recognized as eligible for the National Register of Historic Places as significant components of the expressway system and as creative engineering solutions to the massive volume of traffic anticipated when shifts changed at the bomber plant. They can be found along US 12 as it passes by the Willow Run plant, now called Willow Run Transmission.