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1337Delta764
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CO - Why No "G" Or "H" Seats?

Tue Jun 05, 2007 5:25 am

Yes, I know this is a strange question, but why don't any of Continental's aircraft have any G or H seats? On the 777s, letters G, H, and I are skipped. I could see why the letter "I" was skipped as it can be mistaken for the number "1"; Delta also skips the letter "I" on their 777s. However, why does CO skip the letters "G" and "H"? Are these letters unlucky for CO? The 767s also skip letters "C" and "J". CO's 777 layout is ABC-DEF-JKL, while Delta's 777s are ABC-DEF-GHJ. CO's 767 layout is AB-DEF-KL, while Delta's is AB-CDE-FG. What is it with CO's odd seat naming convention?
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flyingclrs727
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RE: CO - Why No "G" Or "H" Seats?

Tue Jun 05, 2007 5:58 am

Quoting 1337Delta764 (Thread starter):
. What is it with CO's odd seat naming convention?

Perhaps it makes it easier to determine which block of seat's a seat is in on a twin aisle aircraft. A,B, and C will always between the port windows and left of the first aisle. D, E, F, G. H, and I would always be in the seats between the aisles, and J, K, and L woulld always be between the second aisle and the starboard windows. There are enough letters for up to 12 abreast (the maximum number of allowable seats with twin aisles) without changing the system. Notice Business/First follows the same convention. Their 777 B/F has, AB, DE, KL. They have a consistent nomenclature for their narrow body seats. The economy seats are, ABC, DEF. The B/F seats are AB, EF.



http://www.seatguru.com/airlines/Con...ntal_Airlines_Boeing_737-800_A.php

http://www.seatguru.com/airlines/Con...ntal_Airlines_Boeing_767-400_A.php

http://www.seatguru.com/airlines/Con...nental_Airlines_Boeing_777-200.php
 
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1337Delta764
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RE: CO - Why No "G" Or "H" Seats?

Tue Jun 05, 2007 6:13 am

Quoting FlyingClrs727 (Reply 1):
Perhaps it makes it easier to determine which block of seat's a seat is in on a twin aisle aircraft. A,B, and C will always between the port windows and left of the first aisle. D, E, F, G. H, and I would always be in the seats between the aisles, and J, K, and L woulld always be between the second aisle and the starboard windows. There are enough letters for up to 12 abreast (the maximum number of allowable seats with twin aisles) without changing the system. Notice Business/First follows the same convention. Their 777 B/F has, AB, DE, KL. They have a consistent nomenclature for their narrow body seats. The economy seats are, ABC, DEF. The B/F seats are AB, EF.

However, do any airlines operate a 12 abreast configuration? I don't think so. The 747/A380 will even have trouble fitting an 11 abreast configuration. There is no need to use such a convention. I find Delta's convention to be more convenient, as I would think that the seats would be easier to find for most passengers.
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ANCFlyer
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RE: CO - Why No "G" Or "H" Seats?

Tue Jun 05, 2007 6:21 am

This anomoly isn't proprietary to CO . . .

Some carriers skip row numbers. Some carrier leave out the letters in the seat row . . .

AA skips rows:

Their 738 has their first row of seats numbered 3.

http://www.seatguru.com/airlines/Ame...erican_Airlines_Boeing_737-800.php

HA Skips the seat letters - check out their Y Cabin on this 763: A, B, C, E, G, H, J

http://www.seatguru.com/airlines/Haw...waiian_Airlines_Boeing_767-300.php
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flyingclrs727
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RE: CO - Why No "G" Or "H" Seats?

Tue Jun 05, 2007 6:21 am

Quoting 1337Delta764 (Reply 2):
However, do any airlines operate a 12 abreast configuration? I don't think so.

Not yet, but it is the maximum allowable twin aisle configuration. Perhaps the Y-3 might have an optional 12 abreast configuration. If Continental ever bought a Y-3, their existing system would still work. The window seats are always A and L regardless of the type of plane or which class the ticket is for.
 
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calpsafltskeds
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RE: CO - Why No "G" Or "H" Seats?

Tue Jun 05, 2007 6:24 am

Quoting FlyingClrs727 (Reply 1):
Perhaps it makes it easier to determine which block of seat's a seat is in on a twin aisle aircraft. A,B, and C will always between the port windows and left of the first aisle. D, E, F, G. H, and I would always be in the seats between the aisles, and J, K, and L woulld always be between the second aisle and the starboard windows.

Exactly. The seating plans make sense. It makes more sense if a schedule change downgrades or upsizes the aircraft as pre-assigned seats can be accommodated with less hassle. If DL goes from a 763 to a 772, the right window seats don't match. The same naming convention is somewhat evident in rows. CO's 777, 762 and 764 aircraft all start Y in row 16. (exception is the fewer Pacific version 764, which does have several rows farther forward from Row 10 to 15). Undoubtedly, other airlines have similar seating plans.

For CO, it started with their first widebodied aircraft: 747 and then the DC10.
I remember working with pull off stick-on seat number labels where a template was used to show the rows and seats and block off unavailable seats. There was a label sheet for widebody and narrowbody aircraft.

Narrowbody: ABC always on the left, DEF always on the right side aof the aisle
Widebody: AB and KL were always on the window side of the aisles. DEFGH were always center seats

747
9 across were ABC DEFG KL or AB CEFG JKL
10 across were ABC DEFG JKL

DC10
8 across was AB DEFG KL.
9 across was AB DEFGH KL
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reins485
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RE: CO - Why No "G" Or "H" Seats?

Tue Jun 05, 2007 6:42 am

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 3):

AA skips rows:

Their 738 has their first row of seats numbered 3.

Actually AA does it randomly.

757 (ex TWA), 777 (Flagship Suite), A300 row 1

762, 763, 777 (Coffins) row 2

757 (AA), 738, MD-80 start at row 3

http://www.seatguru.com/airlines/American_Airlines/information.php
 
stylo777
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RE: CO - Why No "G" Or "H" Seats?

Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:00 am

I heard that C and H are designated for the aisle on some airlines.

I'm not sure but I suppose all Airbus aircrafts have AC - DEFG - HK. I didn't see another config so far.
 
Viscount724
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RE: CO - Why No "G" Or "H" Seats?

Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:11 am

When the 747 first went into service (and after the early ones that had 9-abreast Y class seating for the first few years were converted to the now standard 10-abreast), many carriers used ABC DEFG HJK for the 3-4-3 747 layout. Many carriers still use a variation of that system on widebodies with less than 10 seats abreast, with the same letters being used to indicate window and aisle seats. e.g. AC 747s (when they had them) used the ABC DEFG HJK system.

Their current widebody types:

777:
J class: A D G K (i..e A and K are windows and D and G are aisle seats in the center section, just like the 747.
Y class: ABC DEG HJK (same comment as above).

A330/340:
J class: AC DG HK (again, A and K are windows, C and H are aisles in the sections near the windows, and D and G are aisles in the center section)
Y class: AC DEFG HK (same as above)

B767-200 (domestic 2-2-2 J seating):
J class: AC DF HK
Y class: AC DEF HK

B767-300ER (international J class, old product, 5-abreast, 2-2-1; ex-CP aircraft are 1-2-2)
J class: AC DF K (ex-CP aircraft A DF HK)
Y class: AC DEF HK

B767-300ER (new 1-1-1 flat-bed seats in J class):
J class: A ? K (seat chart in their website doesn't indicate the letter for the center seat; probably D)
Y class: AC DEF HK

The 767s are slightly different from other AC widebodies since the aisle seat in the center section on the right side is F while the same seat is G on 777 and A330/340. But otherwise the numbering convention inherited from the 747 is still used. I think many other carriers also use that system, or very similar.

Like most carriers, AC narrowbodies (A319/320/321) use ABC DEF in Y class and AC DF in J class, again A and F always being window seats and C and D aisle seats.

Speaking of CO, the original subject of this thread, another oddity with CO's seat numbering is that they are (if not mistaken) the only major US carrier without a row numbered 13. In many parts of the world it is common to skip row 13 but generally not in North America.
 
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calpsafltskeds
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RE: CO - Why No "G" Or "H" Seats?

Tue Jun 05, 2007 12:04 pm

CO has never had row 13 to my knowledge. At least not since 1968 when I started working for CO.

Could have been Robert F. Six or someone else who made that decision. Maybe Bob Six's star wives were superstitious, Ethel Merman (married 1953-1960) or Audrey Meadows (married in 1961).

Searching Google, I found this article:
http://www.usatoday.com/travel/colum...grossman/2005-10-31-grossman_x.htm

However, the Google search definitely showed that Row 13 exists at the Continental Airlines Arena in East Rutherford, NJ.

[Edited 2007-06-05 05:05:23]
sites.google.com/site/unitedfleetsite/
 
HAL
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RE: CO - Why No "G" Or "H" Seats?

Wed Jun 06, 2007 5:43 am

Hawaiian's original widebodies - L1011 and DC-10's had a 2-5-2 seating configuration in coach, which meant it was AB-CDEFG-HJ (no "I" which may be confused with the number 1). When the 767's went into service with a 2-3-2 configuration, they kept the same relative seating positions, i.e. A=window, C=aisle, E=middle, etc. That meant that seats D and F were the ones eliminated from each row. The main reason for this was that there were a couple of years where both the 767 and DC-10 were being flown side by side, and this kept the confusion to a minimum for the gate agents and reservation agents by keeping the relative seat letters the same. It didn't matter which plane it was, if the passenger had seat G, everyone knew that it was an aisle seat in the middle section. That is what gives us our current AB-CEG-HJ setup.

HAL
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