firefly_cyhz
Posts: 164
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2000 9:21 am

Trip Report: CMM339, 340

Mon Aug 14, 2000 9:00 am

I guess this is going to be alittle different from the other trip reports around here but here it goes anyway. I flew on Canada 3000 flt#339 from Halifax to Amsterdam on July 3rd for my high school graduation present from my parents. I arrived at the airport on time and went to check in at the newly expanded check in area at YHZ. Other than an Icelandair flight that was to leave at about the same time as ours the hall was pretty well empty. After going through security I walked the full length of the terminal to gate 26 where our 757 was to board but it had not yet arrived from Toronto. Finally it was time to board and I had seat 39A which was in the last row. While I waited to leave I looked out over the ramp but couldn't see much because it was night and it was raining and foggy, however I did see a Continental 737 that had just landed. We finally pushed back and took off on rwy 24 at about 23:25. I tried to follow our flight by using my compass and some old Jepp charts that I have. From what I can tell we flew Direct to Sydney (YQY) and then to Torbay (YYT) and then on our oceanic track. I picked it up again as we finished our oceanic crossing and think we followed this route ( it was completely overcast the entire way across so I could only use my compass). First we flew to a checkpoint south of Ireland called GUNSO and then to one called GALPI. From there we flew over Lands End (LND) on the southwest corner of England, then to Southampton (SAM), then to Dover (DVR) in the southeast of England. After that it lookes like flew direct to REDFA for our arrival in Amsterdam. We landed on rwy 06 at Amsterdam and taxied to our gate which was E24 on the newly extended E-pier. The light coming through the clear spots in the sky made the colours of all the KLM aircraft look spectacular. We parked at gate E24 at the newly extended E-pier right next to a KLM 747-300 which pushed back after we stopped and revealed a Malaysia Airlines 777-200. It was really neat to see the bigger planes because in Halifax you don't usually see anything bigger than a 767-200 altough ocassionaly you may see an A330 or L1011 but it is usually just dash 8s and DC-9s. Any way we had to walk a long way to get our bags and mine, of couse, was one of the last ones to make it to the belt. I was very surprised going through passport control and customs as they seemed to not even notice I was there (no hard time here). I spent a week having fun in Amsterdam but it rained all but 2 of the days I was there. I really did not want to leave but the time finally came and I made the trip to Central Station to get the train to the airport. It was raining as usual but stopped long enough for me to go to the observation deck and watch my plane land. Our plane (757-200 C-FXOK)was completely filled as it had been on our trip in. Our flight Canada 3000 flt#340 Amsterdam to Halifax left gate D4 a little late and used a REFSO departure off of rwy 01L and then I think went on a route over Lambourne (LAM), then to Southampton (SAM) again, then to Lands End (LND), followed by GALPI and KENUK. We flew an oceanic route at FL350 on the following coordinates I beleive: 50N 15W, 50N 20W, 50N 30W, 49N 40W, 48N 50W, and then Torbay (YYT). As we were nearing 50W I got a chance to go up and visit the flight deck. The first officer pointed to her right and 1000 feet below us and just to the right of our plane almost under us was a Delta 767-200 going in the same direction as us but a little faster. It was so close I could almost see the registration number on it! As our flight continued we flew from Torbay direct to Halifax (YHZ) where we landed on rwy 24 and taxied to gate 22. Unfortunatly it was cloudy for this whole flight as well. We had a long wait going through customs and then an even longer one waiting for my checked bags, which once again were some of the last ones to arrive. Overall it was a great flight both ways (except for the clouds) and I only wish I had stayed longer in Amsterdam. Well that's about all I have to say, I didn't really pay much attention to the sevice from the flight attendants or food so I can't really say much about that (no compalaints). I hope you liked reading this but sorry if you didn't.
 
Marrty
Posts: 99
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 1999 2:44 am

RE: Trip Report: CMM339, 340

Mon Aug 14, 2000 9:22 am

Great report, Firefly!

CMM is a great airline.
 
hmmmm...
Posts: 1959
Joined: Tue May 18, 1999 8:32 am

RE: Trip Report: CMM339, 340

Mon Aug 14, 2000 1:08 pm

Very interesting trip report.

Just curious. How did you pick up the flight route again after crossing the Atlantic? And how did you ascertain the checkpoints along the way and the co-ordinates and the times at which those co-ordinates changed?

I'm cocky if I can find the lavatory and get back to my original seat again.

So you are one hell of a navigator to do that with just a chart and a compass from seat 39A.

Hmmmm...

An optimist robs himself of the joy of being pleasantly surprised
 
firefly_cyhz
Posts: 164
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2000 9:21 am

RE: Trip Report: CMM339, 340

Tue Aug 15, 2000 12:23 am

What I did was I wrote down the time and new heading when ever we turned. I also listen to what the pilot says about our route. On the way over they said we would pass over a place called Lands End and we would pass south of London. After the flight was over I just try and connect the dots using the time and heading to each reporting point. As for the coordinates for the way back to YHZ when I went up to the flight deck the first officer was showing me how the FMS worked and I just read what it said. I am not positive that was the route we took but I think it was a pretty good guess. If it is not right than at least it provides entertainment for me for many hours.
 
hmmmm...
Posts: 1959
Joined: Tue May 18, 1999 8:32 am

RE: Trip Report: CMM339, 340

Thu Aug 17, 2000 11:53 am

It's amazing that you were able to detect small charges in course. And across the Atlantic tracks the changes are small in deed. Then you were able to time the intervals between these changes, calculate your ground speed, and then plot everything on a Jeppesen chart to determine the flight route. Certainly not impossible, but from seat 39A that is impressive. I tip my hat to you, sir.

If you like that kind of stuff, don't get a GPS unit, a global positioning satellite unit. It takes all the work out of that age-old process, and they cost only a few hundred dollars. They not only give you your co-ordinates at any time or place, but they also give you the ground speed at which you are moving. The better units show a moving map display as well. With that, you are better equipped to navigate across the Atlantic than most aircraft. I believe that most airliners today still use ground-based radio beacons for navigating around the world.

Hmmmm...
An optimist robs himself of the joy of being pleasantly surprised