Guest

Assorted News From Flight International

Wed Mar 28, 2001 10:24 pm

Here are some assorted news stories from this week's Flight International. Some of this will probably be old news for some of you, so I apologise, but I have checked Airwise and Just Planes, which don't have these stories.

AA will not accept TWA's Airbus orders. It will accept the 30 B717's already flying, and slated for delivery this year, according to airline officials and the aircraft manufacturer.

Late last month, AA said only that it would accept leases or debt on approximately 175 TWA aircraft, including Boeing MD-80's, 757's and 717's, while rejecting 10 aircraft in TWA's fleet which do not fit AA's fleet mix or are high maintenance items.

Additionally, AA will accept a further 15 B717's scheduled for delivery this year.

TWA will cost AA $742 million plus $3 billion of debt.


ROUTES NEWS

Air India is seeking US clearence to start Mumbai-Los Angeles services via Kuala Lumpur, which will be operated under code-share with Malaysia Airlines.

Aeroflot has halted Moscow-Kuala Lumpur services.

GO-Fly will halt flights to Lisbon.

AA will drop TWA's daily New York-Tel Aviv service.

Other News

The insurers of a Malaysia Airlines Airbus 330-300 damaged by cargo hold chemical leak have finally declared the aircraft a total loss.

The spill occured on a flight from Beijing to Kuala Lumpur on 15March 2000, though Airbus did not complete the assessment of the cost of repairs until early March this year.

The toxic chemical caused corrosive damage primarily to the aircrft's cargo hold, wingbox structure and landing gear, the sources say.

Some 2t of the chemical, contained within a large number of canisters, had been due for onward shipment to Chennai, India.

Five airport workers fell ill as they unloaded baggage from the A330 at Kuala Lumpur immedialtely after the chemical spill.

Malaysia's Department of Civil Aviation has not released any findings from its investigation.

*There is also a report on the Thai 737 explosion at BKK, but it is too long to type out. Since investigations have failed to find any trace of explosives, investigators are now concentrating on the centre fuel tank.

This is because analysis of the CVR has indicated that the noise signature of the initial explosion was similar to that of a blast in the centre fuel tank of a PAL 737-300 which was being pushed back from the stand at MNL on 11 May 1990.*