jocke08
Posts: 81
Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2000 9:22 pm

SAS - Airbus

Mon Apr 02, 2001 1:41 am

Hi,

which series of the A330 and A340 have SAS ordered?

I also wonder if any of the A340 (or A330) will fly from Arlanda? By the way Arlanda is bigger then Copanhagen/Kastrup.

Jocke08,
Sweden
 
raggi
Posts: 879
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2000 4:34 am

RE: SAS - Airbus

Mon Apr 02, 2001 1:59 am

SAS has ordered the A340-300 and the A330-300...

They`ll probably be used on Arlanda- Newark, and Arlanda- O`hare routes.... The 333, that is.. the Atlantic routes will primarily be operated by the 333s, while Far-east routes will see 343s....

To my knowledge, CPH is bigger than ARN....

hope that helps....

raggi
Stick & Rudder
 
Thom@s
Posts: 11674
Joined: Thu Oct 19, 2000 2:03 am

RE: SAS - Airbus

Mon Apr 02, 2001 2:07 am

I also thought CPH was bigger then ARN. I've only seen videos from ARN, but I've been to CPH, and it looked a lot bigger.

Thom@s
"If guns don't kill people, people kill people - does that mean toasters don't toast toast, toast toast toast?"
 
GOT
Posts: 1843
Joined: Sun Dec 31, 2000 6:44 am

RE: SAS - Airbus

Mon Apr 02, 2001 2:23 am

ARN is bigger hen CPH, that's a fact, but CPH will remain as SAS main hub. The A330/A340 are both -300 series and they will absolutely fly from ARN. All the current 767 on the long routes will be replaced with the new A330/A340. Sadly, you will probably only see the the A330 in ARN as the A340 will mainly be used on Far-East routes. I can't wait until I see the first aircraft in SAS c/s.

GOT
Just like birdwatching - without having to be so damned quiet!
 
sas767
Posts: 386
Joined: Tue Dec 14, 1999 4:08 am

RE: SAS - Airbus

Mon Apr 02, 2001 5:30 am

It's correct that SAS have ordered a mix of A330's and A340's but rumours are saying that all the ordered A330's might be converted to A340's. This way it will be possible to achieve higher utility and flexibility on the intercontinental network.

But as it looks now the A340's will mainly be used on the routes to the Far East from Copenhagen (Bangkok, Beijing, Delhi, Singapore and Tokyo) and the A330's on the routes to North America (From CPH: Chicago, New York, Seattle and Washington. From ARN: Chicago and New York. From OSL: New York).

BTW it's also correct that Arlanda is larger then Copenhagen/Kastrup measured in number of passengers, but it's very equal: The figures for year 2000 says CPH 18.1 million pax and ARN 18.25 million pax. The large difference between the two airports is that CPH have far more international passengers then ARN.

The conclusion must be that CPH is might not the largest airport in Scandinavia but it's the most important seen in an international aspect. This is presumably the reason why CPH outside Scandinavia is better well known then ARN and often is considered as the largest in Scandinavia.

I know that the Swedes in Stockholm would like to see ARN go past CPH as the most important airport for the Scandinavia market, but with the strategy SAS have for the coming years I'm quite sure this won't happen.

Best regards

SAS767
Copenhagen, Denmark
 
prebennorholm
Posts: 6430
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2000 6:25 am

RE: SAS - Airbus

Mon Apr 02, 2001 6:22 am

It is correct that CPH actually is slightly smaller than ARN today.
What happened was that first the great belt bridge was built, then the train station at the CPH terminal 3, and finally the bridge to southern Sweden - a lot of "local" CPH pax are are from southern Sweden.
Domestic traffic in Denmark has almost collapsed - surface transport is often much faster and more convenient. Several routes have closed down, and most of the rest have changed from loads of MD-80 and 737-300 to ATR-42, F-50 and Dash-8.
Sweden is ten times larger and therefore has a natural and ever growing domestic traffic.
A very typical passenger at ARN is often in transit between a domostic feeder route and an international route. He counts as two passengers, but doesn't even see an ARN check-in counter.
On the other hand a typical CPH passenger mostly has CPH as his destination, at least as air transport passenger. He actually checks in there, but counts only as one passenger.
Therefore CPH may look larger, but it isn't.
In addition, in older days practically all Danish international passengers passed CPH. Today half of the population, who lives in western part of the country - Jutland - more and more use feeder routes from Billund, Aarhus, etc. to other hubs, Amsterdan, London, Frankfurt etc. and fly out in the world on BA, LH or KLM instead of SAS.
In the good old days CPH was a good transit hub with not very frequent missed connections caused by congestions. Today it is no better than the other large hubs in western Europe.
Add to that, that at all Jutland airports you just park your car and walk two minutes to the terminal. Parking a car at CPH at rushhour time is a mental - and economic - nightmare.
Best regards, Preben Norholm
Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs
 
prebennorholm
Posts: 6430
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2000 6:25 am

RE: SAS - Airbus

Mon Apr 02, 2001 6:25 am

It is correct that CPH actually is slightly smaller than ARN today.
What happened was that first the great belt bridge was built, then the train station at the CPH terminal 3, and finally the bridge to southern Sweden - a lot of "local" CPH pax are are from southern Sweden.
Domestic traffic in Denmark has almost collapsed - surface transport is often much faster and more convenient. Several routes have closed down, and most of the rest have changed from loads of MD-80 and 737-300 to ATR-42, F-50 and Dash-8.
Sweden is ten times larger and therefore has a natural and ever growing domestic traffic.
A very typical passenger at ARN is often in transit between a domostic feeder route and an international route. He counts as two passengers, but doesn't even see an ARN check-in counter.
On the other hand a typical CPH passenger mostly has CPH as his destination, at least as air transport passenger. He actually checks in there, but counts only as one passenger.
Therefore CPH may look larger, but it isn't.
In addition, in older days practically all Danish international passengers passed CPH. Today half of the population, who lives in western part of the country - Jutland - more and more use feeder routes from Billund, Aarhus, etc. to other hubs, Amsterdan, London, Frankfurt etc. and fly out in the world on BA, LH or KLM instead of SAS.
In the good old days CPH was a good transit hub with not very frequent missed connections caused by congestions. Today it is no better than the other large hubs in western Europe.
Add to that, that at all Jutland airports you just park your car and walk two minutes to the terminal. Parking a car at CPH at rushhour time is a mental - and economic - nightmare.
Best regards, Preben Norholm
Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs