777X
Posts: 850
Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2014 12:44 am

Airways Article On CO EWR-HKG

Fri Apr 27, 2001 12:18 am

For those of you that are interested, the current issue of Airways has an interesting article on the new CO 777 EWR-HKG Polar route flight.

Among other things it notes that the 777-200ER that CO uses can fly the route (~7300nm) without any payload restrictions year round, except in cases of extreme headwind. It also talks a bit about the Cargo suppression system installed, with provision for 222 minutes of cargo fire suppression, a feature not provided for in 747s/A340s that fly on the route. Makes me feel better flying on an ETOPS twin than a non ETOPS quad.

Regards
777x
 
wolfy
Posts: 330
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2001 12:07 pm

Etops

Fri Apr 27, 2001 12:31 am

Hello, it might be a stupid question, but could canyone tell me what does ETOPS mean?  Sad

Thx!
 
calpilot
Posts: 881
Joined: Sun Oct 17, 1999 5:16 am

RE: Etops

Fri Apr 27, 2001 12:38 am

Exteneded Twin engine operations (ETOPS). And before anyone says "Over water", wrong...

There are many routes over land that do not have the "Alternate requirments" to fly outside of the ETOPS rules.
 
wolfy
Posts: 330
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2001 12:07 pm

Etops Again

Fri Apr 27, 2001 12:39 am

Mind telling me what does it do? Thx really much!

Regards,

Wolfy
 
kaitak
Posts: 8967
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 1999 5:49 am

RE: Etops Again

Fri Apr 27, 2001 12:56 am

Hi Wolfy

As CALPilot said, ETOPS is an acronym and it is basically the regulatory procedure (laid down by the FAA for US airlines and others for their own airlines) to allow twin engined aircraft to divert more than a certain amount from a suitable alternate when operating extended range flights. CALPilot is quite correct in saying it's not only over-water flights; certain trips over land require such rules to be followed - for example, the trans-siberian route from Europe to Tokyo, where there would be few suitable diversion airports available. In practice, about 90% of ETOPS flights are over water.

The diversions started at about 60 minutes, then went up to 90 with the 767 back in the mid 1980s; it was really the 767 which gave birth to the proliferation of extended range twin ops we now see and the allowable diversion time has now gone through 120 mins, 138, 180, 207 and, as you've seen with the 777, 222 minutes - or nearly 4 hours! (The reason they choose "odd" figures like 138 and 207 is to fit in with actual transatlantic routes.)

Of course, cynics might say it stands for Engines Turning Or Passengers Swimming, but thankfully we have none of those on airliners.net!
 
wolfy
Posts: 330
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2001 12:07 pm

Kaitak

Fri Apr 27, 2001 1:34 am

Thx sooooo much for your information!  Smile I'm so into these kinds of stuffs, although I'm still kindda lost, but what u said sounds very very interesting to me!  Smile Appreciated!

Regards,

Wolfy
 
777X
Posts: 850
Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2014 12:44 am

Etops Cargo Fire Suppressant Requirements

Fri Apr 27, 2001 1:51 am

Well, actually the CO 777's are only 180minute ETOPS rated, and there is no such thing as 222 minute ETOPS (yet  Big grin ), however the 222 minutes of cargo fire supression stems from

207 minutes (Although CO is not yet 207 min ETOPS rated, they have this capability should they need it in the future) + 15 minutes extra (as required by the FARs)

So at minumum an ETOPS 180 rated a/c needs to have 195 minutes of cargo fire suppressant, while a 207 minute ETOPS a/c needs 222 minutes.

Regards
Nikolai