brijabar
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu May 24, 2007 6:42 pm

Restored Aircraft

Tue Jun 05, 2001 2:19 am

Here in MSO we have a small museum that is restoring an old twin beech. It will be a static display- but fully restored inside and out. Delta has a restored DC-3 that I would love to see. It is so great to see these old birds looking like new. What is the nicest restored airplane out there?
 
Mac
Posts: 287
Joined: Thu May 24, 2001 11:56 am

RE: Restored Aircraft

Tue Jun 05, 2001 2:44 am



If you are speaking of restored passenger aircraft, there are two that come to mind. One is the Lockheed 1049 Super G Constellation based at the Airline History Museum at Kansas City, Mo.

The second....and probably the very best of any restoration regarding aircraft, is the Pan American Boeing 307 Stratoliner which is nearly ready for roll-out at the Boeing facility in Seattle, Washington. This aircraft, like the Constellation, is restored to flying condition and will probably do some fly-bys before being turned over to its owner, the National Air and Space Museum. The Clipper Flying Cloud will be on display at the NASM annex at Dulles International Airport. It will also be the very first NASM aircraft to be open for public tours.
 
Mac
Posts: 287
Joined: Thu May 24, 2001 11:56 am

RE: Restored Aircraft

Tue Jun 05, 2001 8:09 am

There is also a restored DC-3 in Piedmont livery which is a beauty!
 
IMissPiedmont
Posts: 6200
Joined: Wed May 23, 2001 12:58 pm

RE: Restored Aircraft

Tue Jun 05, 2001 12:16 pm

Too many too list. My favourites are the really rare, fkying or not. The Boeing 307 as mentioned is one, the Martin Mariner at the Pima Air and Space Museum is another. One will make one last flight (S-307), the other will not (Mariner), at least I hope in both cases.
The day you stop learning is the day you should die.
 
IMissPiedmont
Posts: 6200
Joined: Wed May 23, 2001 12:58 pm

RE: Restored Aircraft

Tue Jun 05, 2001 12:17 pm

Too many too list. My favourites are the really rare, fkying or not. The Boeing 307 as mentioned is one, the Martin Mariner at the Pima Air and Space Museum is another. One will make one last flight (S-307), the other will not (Mariner), at least I hope in both cases.
The day you stop learning is the day you should die.