concorde1518
Posts: 723
Joined: Thu May 17, 2001 12:02 pm

What Happens During Cruise?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 5:46 am

I was wondering what the pilots do during the cruise and between fuel checks. can they just talk amongst themselves? Also, can theyeat/drink, like when snacks and meals are served, and what do they eat, first class food or economy?
h
 
prebennorholm
Posts: 6430
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2000 6:25 am

RE: What Happens During Cruise?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 5:52 am

They bring a laptop computer on which they play FS-2000.  Acting devilish
Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs
 
prebennorholm
Posts: 6430
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2000 6:25 am

RE: What Happens During Cruise?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 6:41 am

Sorry Aaron, for the rude answer above.

But if you get professionals to answer, then I think that they will tell you that at least during long distance flights there really isn't much to do during a substantial part of the cruise.

So they will spoil the time much the same way as their passengers, except two things:
They won't sleep.
And hopefully they won't be screeming "booze, more booze" at the FA's all the time.

That means lots of newspapers, books, magazines, maybe a discman. They will probably often be bringing manuals to study for their next simulator test.

Best regards, Preben Norholm
Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs
 
B747-437B
Posts: 8777
Joined: Thu May 30, 2002 6:54 am

RE: What Happens During Cruise?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 7:28 am

Mile High Club
"The A340-300 may boast a long range, but the A340 is underpowered" -- Robert Milton, CEO - Air Canada
 
jumbojettim
Posts: 159
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2001 11:59 am

RE: What Happens During Cruise?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 9:37 am

As mentioned earlier, pilots on longer flights do nothing. There is a lot of reading and talking. As far as the food, they get economy food unless there is extra first class meals. They do eat and drink while flying (autopilot).

Later
 
Guest

RE: What Happens During Cruise?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 9:40 am

Prebennorholm,

You would be surprised at how many airlines allow crews to sleep, even two man crews. Plus in a lot of cases they aren’t allowed to read any non-relevant material and most certainly not listen to discmans.

As the old saying goes, hours and hours of boredom interspersed with moments of shear terror.....
 
LOT767-300ER
Posts: 8526
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 2001 12:57 pm

RE: What Happens During Cruise?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 9:41 am

The Moons out tonight! Yea baby!
 
Air NZ
Posts: 201
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2001 11:12 am

RE: What Happens During Cruise?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 10:14 am

They could scare their Passengers by walking down the aisle and getting the pilot to talk over the Intercom Cpatain ........ "How do you fly a plane again?"
 
Buff
Posts: 1066
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2007 1:29 pm

RE: Ambasaid

Tue Jun 12, 2001 2:15 pm

Boring is good!

Bring on more boredom. Problem-solving is for the simulator: no one wants to do it for real.

But seriously folks: The cruise portion of any flight is usually quite relaxed. But there are many things that must be done/monitored and it's difficult to say that "monitoring" something is akin to doing "nothing". ATC is a constant listening watch - it is a serious bruise to one's ego to miss a call. Trans Atlantic flights require constant updates of position and enroute weather (ETP's and destination). Navigation accuracy is vital when outside the areas of coverage of VOR/DME's.

While one might say those are menial tasks, try to think of the available time as gaps that will be more than filled when something goes wrong. If on the standard trans-Atlantic flight there is a "gap" of thirty minutes between reporting points, if a navigation accuracy degrade is suspected, the cockpit gets downright hot with activity. If God forbid an engine fails or pressurization is lost, the gaps may be insufficient to get things done smoothly and time has to be extended.

I don't know what the original poster had in mind when asking this question, but to me it is somewhat of a flame-baiting question: those that don't know anything about the subject will have the most colourful opinions; those of us in the thick of it will regard it as a "wind-up".

Best Regards,

Buff
 
Buff
Posts: 1066
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2007 1:29 pm

RE: What Happens During Cruise?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 2:21 pm

I don't know what the original poster had in mind when asking this question, but to me it is somewhat of a flame-baiting question: those that don't know anything about the subject will have the most colourful opinions; those of us in the thick of it will regard it as a "wind-up".

I just re-read the thread and apologize for this statement. The original question is fair and equitable!

In addition to sucking back lots of tea or coffee, meals are usually provided, prepared separately for Capt/FO/FE, some airlines allow various reading materials (C-3 doesn't); cockpit visits are allowed under strict circumstances; flight attendants may decide to take a break "out of the public view" - they are human beings too, depending upon who you ask (uh oh...)...

Humbly,

Buff
 
deltairlines
Posts: 6877
Joined: Mon May 24, 1999 4:47 am

RE: What Happens During Cruise?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 10:38 pm

On a BA flight I was on the crew spent the time talking with flight deck guests and the flight attendants on the upper deck of the 747 (not to mention drinking coffee)

Jeff
 
Guest

RE: What Happens During Cruise?

Wed Jun 13, 2001 4:19 am

DeltAirlines

Did you happen to notice if it was a single/augmented or double crew, what about check airmen, deadheaders or were the seats in the cockpit just left physically empty?
 
csavel
Posts: 1270
Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2001 9:38 pm

RE: What Happens During Cruise?

Wed Jun 13, 2001 4:48 am

I remember back in the seventies reading a paperback book about airlines and air transport, (Wish I could remember the title or author) anyway the author quoted a first officer of a British long-haul airliner that found himself drifting off to sleep. He aroused himself and saw the captain and engineer fast asleep. The author noted, dryly, "black coffee was ordered all around."

I may be ugly. I may be an American. But don't call me an ugly American.

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