csavel
Posts: 1270
Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2001 9:38 pm

Grooming For The Crew

Fri Jun 29, 2001 3:57 am

http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/world/south_asia/newsid_1412000/1412218.stm
People may find this BBC article interesting. It concerns a steward from Indian Airlines who refuses to cut his handlebar moustache which goes against newly implemented grooming regs.

Which leads me to ask.
How detailed are the grooming regs?

I guess you can't look like a slob, but how specific are they?
Long hair on men? Beards, Moustaches? Make-up and how much for women? Can a man have an earring? A nose ring?

I would love to hear from F/As about how exacting the standards are
I may be ugly. I may be an American. But don't call me an ugly American.
 
B747-437B
Posts: 8777
Joined: Thu May 30, 2002 6:54 am

RE: Grooming For The Crew

Fri Jun 29, 2001 4:02 am

I've actually flown with this Mr.De on a CCU-BOM segment a few years ago and he was a remarkable personality on board (not to mention that his moustache is quite AMAZING!). Considering that most of IC's meal services come in prepackaged boxes, it would be pretty difficult to prove a health hazard.

I hope some kind of compromise can be reached (maybe a moustache net during food services?) and he gets back in the air soon. Folks like him are few and far between.
"The A340-300 may boast a long range, but the A340 is underpowered" -- Robert Milton, CEO - Air Canada
 
csavel
Posts: 1270
Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2001 9:38 pm

RE: Grooming For The Crew

Fri Jun 29, 2001 4:49 am

B747-437B,
How lucky for you and I totally agree!
I think corporations in general, not just airlines, suffer when they think that any customer service employee must adhere to a cookie-cutter look.
You *can* be professional and polite and still be an individual.

Well, that's a rant for the future.
I may be ugly. I may be an American. But don't call me an ugly American.
 
blink182
Posts: 5278
Joined: Mon Oct 18, 1999 3:09 am

RE: Grooming For The Crew

Fri Jun 29, 2001 5:23 am

I think it looks pretty good. Plus it doesn't even hang, how can it be a hazard? He should be able to keep the mustache, hopefully he wins.
rgds,
blink182
Give me a break, I created this username when I was a kid...
 
Guest

RE: Grooming For The Crew

Mon Jul 02, 2001 2:44 pm

Seen in the paper yesterday that CX has banned male FA's from wearing makeup  Smile/happy/getting dizzy
 
Guest

RE: Grooming For The Crew

Sat Jul 07, 2001 9:22 pm

Hi All, Just found this on www.airwise.com

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Qantas New Zealand Flight Attendants Protest Make-Up Rules

Qantas New Zealand Flight Attendants Protest Make-Up Rules



Dec 10, 2000

The union representing flight attendants at Qantas New Zealand says the airline's corporate uniform policy, which outlines strict guidelines for dress and grooming for both men and women, demonstrates an "old-fashioned, stereotypical view of women."

In a policy section headed Natural Beauty, the carrier tells women flight attendants that the no-makeup "natural look" is unacceptable, even when they are coming or going to work, the New Zealand Herald reported.

"Appropriate makeup is an essential part of your overall look as it enhances the corporate image when in uniform," the policy states. "Apply foundation when necessary, use neutral tones to accentuate your eyes and add a hint of warm shading to bring out your cheeks."

Neither sex may have wet hair or have "dark roots showing" and men must not sport "very short, wedged or pageboy cuts," the newspaper said.

Staff are advised to take care when eating strongly flavored foods and to tell a colleague if he or she has bad breath.

Although there are restrictions on men's hairstyles, and beards and moustaches are disallowed for safety reasons, the men's guidelines are far less rigorous.

Union national secretary Andrew Little said it was reasonable for an employer to require staff to be clean and tidy and to wear a uniform, but a "highly prescriptive" approach to makeup and dress, at the expense of comfort, was a different matter.

"Women who work in airlines are there to do a job, not just for the viewing pleasure of male travelers," Little was reported by the New Zealand Herald as saying.

The Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union said it has taken a petition and letters to the airline expressing staff concerns.

The Herald cited John Cordery, the airline's public relations manager, as saying the union had made no formal approaches about their concerns.

The grooming standards were normal for an airline "that wants to present itself in a neat, tidy and very professional manner."

"I'm not going to get into discussing our policy with you. We have a policy which is clear and discussed with frontline staff," the newspaper quoted Cordery as saying.

Air New Zealand spokesman Alistair Carthew did not want to discuss specific details of the airline's corporate wardrobe and grooming, but said "we have people who set those guidelines and enforce them, as well."

Air NZ had many female flight attendants and it was important their clothes and grooming reflected the company's brand. "They are the face of the airline to most of our customers," Carthew said.
***************


I know this is quite old but can you tell me if it is QANTAS' guidlines or the now dead Tasman Pacific's

Ta

~J~