e38
Topic Author
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Spanish Translation

Wed Mar 23, 2011 2:24 am

For our Spanish-speaking A.Netters:

I have been studying Spanish for a few years but have not found a good translation for "Flight Attendant." Here is what I have been told (the source of the information is in parenthesis):

1. Azafata (from a Spanish textbook used in high school)
2. Auxiliar (from an Iberia flight attendant)
3. Sobrecargo (from a Mexicana flight attendant)
3. Asistente de Vuelo (from the back of a Delta Air Lines safety card).

Which is correct and in which part of the Spanish-speaking world is it used (Spain, South America, Mexico/Central America)? Are there any other translations?

Also, I have heard two terms for pilot--piloto and ejecutivo. Are both correct?

Thank you. Muchas Gracias para las informaciones y de ayudarme.

e38
 
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Coal
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RE: Spanish Translation

Wed Mar 23, 2011 6:13 am

I remember from my days living and traveling to Colombia they were just called Azafata (stewardess) and Asistente de Vuelo (mostly for the male F/As, which weren't comon back then).

I just called them "Ingeniero/a de comfort de vuelo"    After all, isn't that what they will end up being called in English?

Cheers
Coal
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Aeroflot001
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RE: Spanish Translation

Wed Mar 23, 2011 12:20 pm

In Argentina i have heard the usage of Azafata and Auxiliar equally so both are correct. I hadnever heard the expression Sobrecargo beofer, interesting.
 
chepos
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RE: Spanish Translation

Wed Mar 23, 2011 1:36 pm

I have always refered to f/a's as asistente de vuelo or azafatas (females only). Never ever have I refered toa f/a as an auxiliar.

Regards,

Chepos
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OP3000
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RE: Spanish Translation

Wed Mar 23, 2011 5:05 pm

Azafata is still the most widely used term by the public for female flight attendants (the equivalent to stewardess - though more politically correct in Spanish). Otherwise it's "asistente de vuelo" or "auxiliar de vuelo".

And Mexicans do use the term "sobrecargo", but also use and understand the other two. Perhaps a Mexican member can expand on this.

IIRC from my Iberia flights in crews in Spain use the term "auxiliar de vuelo" more (though auxiliar and asistente are synonyms and easily interchangeable).
 
AR385
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RE: Spanish Translation

Wed Mar 23, 2011 6:27 pm

The most common terms used here in Mexico are "Azafata" and "sobrecargo". "Asistente de vuelo" I have nerver heard and sounds too baroque, heavy if you get my drift, same with "Auxiliar de vuelo", which gives the connotation of a nurse.

In Spain "Azafata" is also used although less and less as it can also mean your average pretty young lady standing by displays in convention centers.

I have heard "Auxiliar de vuelo" in Argentina but older people also still use "Azafata". But if you go by AR I would call them "Señoritas or auxiliares incompetentes", but I don´t know if that would catch.

"Ejecutivo de vuelo" I have never heard anywhere.
 
OP3000
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RE: Spanish Translation

Thu Mar 24, 2011 3:07 am

Quoting AR385 (Reply 5):
In Spain "Azafata" is also used although less and less as it can also mean your average pretty young lady standing by displays in convention centers.

LOL - this I did not know. I guess I have to hang out more at the Feria de Madrid 
 
e38
Topic Author
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RE: Spanish Translation

Thu Mar 24, 2011 6:03 pm

Muchas gracias a todos.
Thank you very much for the information.

I found it interesting that "azafata" is still used quite a bit. I was told once by a Spanish professor that "Azafata" is really very formal, older Spanish and not used frequently--much like "stewardess" in English, but as was mentioned, azafata is not considered a "negative" or "politically incorrect" term in Spanish.

As an aside, I have never found the word "Stewardess" to be negative or derogatory. To me, the term "Stewardess" still implies a very dignified, respectable, professional career.

Thank you for the replies. Spanish is certainly a beautiful language--I'm working hard to learn it. Estudio mucho.

e38
 
maiYYZ
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RE: Spanish Translation

Thu Mar 24, 2011 9:58 pm

Just on a side note, in Brazilian Portuguese we say aeromoça or comissária de bordo, but in Portugal they call it hospedeira... And we speak the same language. That just to say that even in the same language, you could have different names.
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Checo77
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RE: Spanish Translation

Thu Mar 24, 2011 11:47 pm

I like to use "tripulacion de cabina"  

Adam
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SKY1
Posts: 611
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RE: Spanish Translation

Fri Mar 25, 2011 2:10 am

Nowadays the right, official term in Spain is T.C.P (tripulante cabina de pasajeros) but the most common that everybody understand and recognize is "Azafata" (for women) "Azafato" (for men, but not very well-mannered as it sounds a bit 'provincial' or childish) and Auxiliar de Vuelo (for both, women and men)

There are countries such as Venezuela or Cuba that call them "aeromozos/zas" but not sure if it's very colloquial

Quoting op3000 (Reply 4):

And Mexicans do use the term "sobrecargo", but also use and understand the other two. Perhaps a Mexican member can expand on this.

Sobrecargo in the Spanish carriers is used for the one who managed the crew, he's/she's the main responsible kinda like Air France's "Chef de Cabine Principal"

Quoting AR385 (Reply 5):
In Spain "Azafata" is also used although less and less as it can also mean your average pretty young lady standing by displays in convention centers.

In Spain "azafata" can be used for both.

Quoting Checo77 (Reply 9):
I like to use "tripulacion de cabina"

It's used for the entire pax crew, for the all 'team'
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