tomaheath
Topic Author
Posts: 397
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2014 11:58 pm

Cold weather operations.

Sun Dec 31, 2017 2:00 pm

Just curious about what kind of issues arise in cold weather. Here in New Hampshire we’ve been hovering under 10° for the past week got me thinking. Do aircraft start hard in cold weather? I would imagine ramp equipment could be troublesome.
 
User avatar
zeke
Posts: 11686
Joined: Thu Dec 14, 2006 1:42 pm

Re: Cold weather operations.

Sun Dec 31, 2017 3:01 pm

Starting a jet engine in Cold Wx is often quick, some of the issues involved are covered in this document

https://skybrary.aero/bookshelf/books/3404.pdf
Human rights lawyers are "ambulance chasers of the very worst kind.'" - Sky News
 
RetiredWeasel
Posts: 526
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 8:16 pm

Re: Cold weather operations.

Sun Dec 31, 2017 3:10 pm

The airline I worked for had a fairly large section in the Operating Manual that was labeled 'Cold Weather Operations' and I assume other airlines had/have the same section. It covered a myriad of cold weather topics from starting engines to taxing in ice and snow. That airline was based in MSP, so cold was the norm during many months of the year.
Edit:..And the manual didn't have anything to say about how to stay warm during your walkaround, but we learned how to do that too. A non-approved-uniform accessory called a scarf was a necessity!
 
RetiredWeasel
Posts: 526
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 8:16 pm

Re: Cold weather operations.

Sun Dec 31, 2017 3:19 pm

delete this...double post!
 
Woodreau
Posts: 1502
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2001 6:44 am

Re: Cold weather operations.

Sun Dec 31, 2017 5:12 pm

10 degrees is not cold for an aircraft

There are a few things you have to watch for. Covered by the section called Cold Weather Operations retiredwessel mentions

Some of it involves slippery taxiway runway surfaces. Or making sure the cabin is at a comfortable temperature for boarding.

Aircraft encounter temperatures of -40 to -60 degrees everyday flying in the FL300-410 range even in the summer.
Bonus animus sit, ab experientia. Quod salvatum fuerit de malis usu venit judicium.
 
Armadillo1
Posts: 38
Joined: Thu Apr 20, 2017 5:14 pm

Re: Cold weather operations.

Sun Dec 31, 2017 5:50 pm

living in Moscow, still dont understand what are you talking about
 
Tarantine
Posts: 210
Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2000 12:53 pm

Re: Cold weather operations.

Sun Dec 31, 2017 5:52 pm

Cold weather operations for turbine engines is really no issue at all but with the old reciprocating engines, it was a major challenge, especially below zero degrees Fahrenheit.
 
CosmicCruiser
Posts: 2138
Joined: Tue Feb 22, 2005 3:01 am

Re: Cold weather operations.

Sun Dec 31, 2017 9:28 pm

on the jets I flew there was a min oil temp for advancing the throttles above a given power setting. Also I remember that if we were taxiing in snowy, slushy conditions we would stop the checklist at flaps, put a coffee cup over the flap handle as a reminder so as to not think the chklist was done until we reached the runway.
trying to get off the ground before your holdover time expired was a pain.
 
CosmicCruiser
Posts: 2138
Joined: Tue Feb 22, 2005 3:01 am

Re: Cold weather operations.

Sun Dec 31, 2017 9:30 pm

Best I remember in slushy conditions we wouldn't raise the flaps after ldg so maint could chk for packed ice.
 
Tristarsteve
Posts: 3443
Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 11:04 pm

Re: Cold weather operations.

Tue Jan 02, 2018 10:15 am

Working on the ramp, the biggest problem is water. The aircraft water tank is usually near the outflow valve in the rear cargo (except on A320) and the water easily freezes. So you either keep the aircraft warm, or you remove the water. You should not drain the water onto the ground, because it freezes into ice, and the pilot falls over on his walkround, so you drain it into a tank. But there is more than one drain line. The drain valves are rarely used, so have a tendency to stick, usualy open on departure so there is no water on the aircraft.
On a B737, fully draining the water tank does not always win. The air pressurising line from the APU to the water tank is very small diameter, and a drop of frozen water in this line can stop the tank pressurising.
I worked 25 years on the ramp at ARN, and the best solution for us was when we had the aircraft heated all the time. We had this available on T2 and coupled the hose up on every stop. Should be mandatory at all cold weather airports.

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