Mr Spaceman
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L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Fri Jun 08, 2001 8:25 am

Hi guys, while working on a question about L-1011's, I got thinking about the elevators in the lower galley of a Delta Airlines L-1011.

I have some questions. Do these elevators use a seperate sourse of power to operate them, such as electric or hydraulic, that is NOT part of the aircrafts' regular power systems?

Also, do "all" versions of the L-1011 have a lower galley?

Finally, are the Galley Elevators on the aircraft's "Minimum Equipment List"? I know this question sounds a bit strange, I was just thinking, how can you serve the food that is stored in the lower galley, if you can't get at it?

P.S. Delta Airlines must really "care" about their in-flight meals. If you look at the galley photo, you can see the yellow "Warning" signs about storing "COOKIES"!


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Chris


"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
 
LZ-TLT
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Fri Jun 08, 2001 8:47 am

NO, not ALL versions had the underfloor galley. I think, on the 500, it was offered as an option. Along with this, Lockheed offered a rebuild for all earlier TriStars, which placed the kitchen back on the main deck, at the cost of doubled cargo hold capacitiy (from 8 to 6 LD3-container) and many TriStars were re-engineered.
 
Mr Spaceman
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RE: LZ-TLT

Fri Jun 08, 2001 9:10 am

Hi LZ-TLT. Thanks for your response, especially since it must be getting pretty late where you live [it's 8:00pm local time here in Toronto]. One of the reasons why I asked that particullar question was because, if you click on the L-1011's "registration" [N740DA], in the photos, you will see that the aircraft is listed mostly as a 250 version, but also as a 200, and a 385-1-15.

This could be because the registration has moved around to different models of the L-1011 within Delta Airlines, or perhaps the person who took the photo was incorrect, etc.

Chris
"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
 
Mac
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Sat Jun 09, 2001 3:55 am


I am truly amazed at the size of this 'Galley'. Are all galley areas this size on wide bodied aircraft? Are there any other examples of galley photos?

I recall seeing a photo spread many years ago of the Boeing Stratocruiser galley. I thought that was big!
 
A40-TY
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RE: LZ-TLT

Sat Jun 09, 2001 4:01 am

The a/c N740DA is an L-1011-250 model (according to the production list), so we must assume that all the other designations for this a/c are incorrect.
The L-1011-500 was offered with or without the underfloor galley feature. I know for sure that BWIA's L-1011-500' a/c were fitted without the underfloor galleys, but I am not sure about the other L-1011 models.
I love it when a plan comes together
 
Mr Spaceman
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley

Sat Jun 09, 2001 4:16 am

The information is starting to flow and is much appreciated. Mac, I couldn't tell ya about whether or not this L-1011's lower galley is unusually large or not. This is the first time I've ever seen a photo of one myself!

As for the other parts of this question. Does anyone know if these elevators are on the MEL list? Also what is their power source?

Chris

"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
 
Mac
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Sat Jun 09, 2001 5:51 am




Can you imagine what the galley will look like on a A-380?
 
LZ-TLT
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Sat Jun 09, 2001 8:43 pm

A40TY:

The galley was part of the original TriStar construction, and it is large as well.
As a matter of fact, the PSA 1011's were ordered with a 16-seat bar in the underfloor galley and the "kitchen" placed on the main deck

However, many older TriStars were rebuilt in the 500 style. The benefits of the increased cargo hold capacity were just too big. Apologies for the mistype on my previous post, i meant incresing the cargo hold capacity from 8 to 16 LD3-containers
 
Mr Spaceman
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Sun Jun 10, 2001 5:35 am

Hi guys. In the Civil Aviation forum, there is a question I posted yesterday on L-1011's that have a lower level "Cocktail Bar". This is the same type of "Lower Lounge" that LZ-TLT was talking about on PSA L-1011's.

In the 7th reply [I think], there is a cool photo of this lower "cocktail lounge" on an L-1011 in the 1970's.

Chris
"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
 
Mac
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 2:08 am



Does anyone have information and/or photos they can share regarding galleys on the 747 models? It would be interesting to make comparisons of the large wide bodied aircraft galley's.

Also I was not aware that certain models of 747's had non-spiral stair cases aboard. Is it also possible to see photos of this item?

Thank you,
Mac
 
JT-8D
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 3:54 am

There are dc-10s with the elevators too. I know AA has a few, because I rode the elevator to the galley to do a "raid". My buddy over there knows how to eat cheap--lol..JT
 
Mr Spaceman
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RE: JT-8D

Tue Jun 12, 2001 4:37 am

Hi JT-8D. I don't know if you read my originally posted question, but you could probably give my a reply reguarding the "Power Source" for these elevators, as well as, if you think that they are on the MEL list. Are they required to be fully operational before a flight? Just wondering.

Chris
"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
 
JT-8D
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley

Tue Jun 12, 2001 4:49 am

I remember hearing a motor running, so I would assume it was electric. As for the MEL, it would seem logical to assume that it would not be required for short trips. Maybe they could stash enough stuff upstairs for a short trip, but for international, they are going to need access to the galley. I dont remember seeing stairs or any other means to enter the galley, and even if there was, how could you feed 200+ people by bringing the food up stairs? Not likely. I dont have an mel in front of me, but Im sure it would be more of an operational concern because a galley elevator surely would not represent a "safety" problem. Unless they were really hungry and pissed off?--lol..JT
 
Mr Spaceman
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RE: JT-8D

Tue Jun 12, 2001 5:07 am

Thanks alot JT, and to everyone.

P.S. Did anyone figure out what those "Warning" signs about cookies are for?

Chris
"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
 
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DL_Mech
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Tue Jun 12, 2001 11:51 am

Delta served fresh baked cookies to first class passengers around 1995/6 (copying Midwest Express). I vaguely remember that the packaging that the cookies came in would burn in the L10 ovens.

There is one electrical motor for each lift (along with a mechanical hand crank backup). The right lift is powered by the ground service bus (so it can be used without the entire plane being powered up), while the left lift is powered by the Passenger Service bus (I think).

I will check on the MEL reference......

This plane is built to withstand anything... except a bad pilot.
 
UAL Bagsmasher
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley

Tue Jun 12, 2001 1:09 pm

If you look very closely in that pic......you can almost see a ghostlike image forming near that oven door..... Big grin
That being said, UA's DC10-30's had lower galley elevators as well. There was also a little port hole to view the nosegear wheel well. There was a trapdoor in the lower galley ceiling that would open up into the passenger aisle above in case F/A's got stuck due to a broken elevator. I seriously doubt any human could fit thru that opening though. It was about 12"*12". I used to like riding the elevators on those birds. Too bad they are gone Sad
 
LOT767-300ER
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Wed Jun 13, 2001 9:52 am

Ahh the galley....Mile high club awaits!  Big thumbs up
 
777gk
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley

Wed Jun 13, 2001 11:51 am

There was access to the lower galley in four (technically three) ways on the L-1011. First, for loading service items, there was a fairly large door, at which a normal narrowbody-sized catering truck would pull up to to load food aboard the aircraft into the galley. The first picture shows the door and its porthole in good detail (it's to the left of the forward cargo hold door, almost underneath 2R, forward of the wings). The second shot shows a catering truck loading the galley for a night flight to some unknown destination. The door is barely a sliver of light beyond the cargo door, but the catering truck loading it is seen clear as day. The door is operated by rotating a handle to the right of the door. The door opens up and out. There is an approximate 8-foot drop to the ground, therefore it is not a preferred method of escape.


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The next way of entry is the most obvious; the elevators. There are two side-by-side, deep and wide enough for one flight attendant or cart to fit in during normal operations. There are two independent motors which can be used simultaneously. One is used to transport the attendant, the other to transport the carts. There are two jumpseats to the left and right of the doors. The operation of the elevator is accomplished by engaging both UP/DOWN switches inside the lift for flight attendants or using the UP/DOWN/STOP switches on either level for carts. In the event of an electrical failure, the two compartments taking up the lower half of the space between the elevators house handcranks for lifting or lowering the elevators. If there is a motor failure, the selector switch can be moved from the inoperative motor to the working one on the main deck control unit. The lift will operate at half speed, or 6" per second.


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Inside the elevator, there is an escape hatch. To access it, you must push the stirrup above the small utility shelf to a position below it, fold the shelf up, climb up and push the hatch open. You stand up in the shaft, and use the handles to open up the door to the main cabin level.

The fourth way, actually for emergency egress, is the first choice in an abnormal situation, the main cabin access door. To operate, you stand up on top of the work table that comes down when the access door is closed. You pull the handle used to open the hatch, and climb through into the first section of economy class.

 
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DL_Mech
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Wed Jun 13, 2001 12:21 pm

Hey 777GK.....you forgot one.

There is access to the galley from the mid electrical service center (MESC) aft of the galley. There is an access door to the MESC in the wing/body fairing, just below the 2R door.

This is the preferred method of entering a dead airplane when you can't find a ladder tall enough to reach the FESC door under the cockpit......
This plane is built to withstand anything... except a bad pilot.
 
scxmechanic
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley

Wed Jun 13, 2001 3:22 pm

I've worked on both the L-1011 and the DC-10's and it seems the DC-10's lifts are much more powerful than the L-1011's. We had a few problems with sitcky switches and bad relays on the DC-10 lifts... But all in all, they worked just fine - in my opinion.

As for the MEL requirments.... I can't remember what it said about either or both being inop'ed. But I know where I work, if the DC-10 P-Lift (people) was inop, we would rob parts off of the C-Lift (cart) to get the P-Lift operating again and MEL the C-Lift. Both lifts were almost indentical except for the inside diameter of the C-Lift. All motors, relays and switches were pretty much the same... So robbing parts was easy to do so long as a paper trail was created for tracking of Part numbers / Serial numbers and such...

Also on the DC-10, both lifts will work off of the Ground Service Bus, but when in this configuration, only one of the two motors installed on each lift would operate and the lift would run at half speed. With external power online both motors would operate.

We had one aircraft, N153SY that didn't have a lower galley. All of the other DC-10's did...
 
Notarzt
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RE: L-1011 Lower Galley "Elevators"?

Wed Jun 13, 2001 8:27 pm

Back to the designation query...

Lockheed used the following "marketing designations":

TriStar 1
TriStar 40
TriStar 50
TriStar 100
TriStar 150
TriStar 200
TriStar 250
TriStar 500

Please note the word "marketing". On the other hand, there are the following manufacturer and certification (i.e. technical) designations existing:

L-1011-385-1
L-1011-385-1-14
L-1011-385-1-15
L-1011-385-3

These designations really "determine" the model. It does not make sense to explain all the various differences. Here are a few important notes:

L-1011-385-1 is the basic model (long body, basic fuel capacity) which applies for the TriStar 1, TriStar 40, and TriStar 50. The extended L-1011-385-1-14 and L-1011-385-1-15 apply for long body, increased weight models; the "-1-14" extension applies to aircraft with the original fuel capacity, whereas the "-1-15" extension apllies to aircraft with enhanced fuel.
L-1011-385-1-14 is applicable for the TriStar 100, TriStar 150, TriStar 200, and TriStar 250. With the excpetion of the TriStar 150 modification, these models can also be upgraded to a higher fuel capacity (designation L-1011-385-1-15).
Last but not least, L-1011-385-3 decodes the short bodied TriStar 500.

Hope this helps.

Daniel

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