UA752
Topic Author
Posts: 144
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2001 3:30 pm

Airliner Door Questions

Fri Aug 17, 2001 1:22 am

Ive noticed that on most airliners there is some sort of "strip" of metal that proceeds diagonaly along the fuselage...what is this and what's its purpose?

Also I have noticed that on lots of jets that the metal directly below the door is not painted...why is that?

Heres a good example of what Im talking about...


Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Bill Paulsen



Thanks

MSN
 
flight152
Posts: 3211
Joined: Fri Nov 24, 2000 8:04 am

RE: Airliner Door Questions

Fri Aug 17, 2001 1:41 am

It channels the water around the door so the passnegers don't get wet when leaving/boarding the plane. Kinda like a gutter, in fact my mom's Volvo S90 has them too!
 
JSchultz
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Oct 09, 2000 2:44 am

RE: Airliner Door Questions

Fri Aug 17, 2001 1:48 am

That metal strip at the bottom of the door is a scuff plate. They aren't painted for obvious reasons...(Jetways, boarding stairs bump up against them).

Jim
 
UA752
Topic Author
Posts: 144
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2001 3:30 pm

RE: Airliner Door Questions

Fri Aug 17, 2001 1:50 am

hmm....simpler than I thought...thanks again

MSN
 
musang
Posts: 788
Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2001 4:11 am

RE: Airliner Door Questions

Fri Aug 17, 2001 2:20 am

Those rain gutters above the doors are, on some types, angled to align with the local airflow, to cause less drag.

Therefore you might see one at a forward door sloping down towards the front, and one on a rear door sloping down towards the rear. On other types they're all horizontal.

To get an illustration of the direction of flow along a fuselage, look for one with toilet fluid leaking from the forward servicing panel!

Regards - Musang
 
Klaus
Posts: 20578
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2001 7:41 am

UA752

Fri Aug 17, 2001 3:35 am

UA752: Also I have noticed that on lots of jets that the metal directly below the door is not painted...why is that?

Another possible explanation is given here: http://www.concordesst.com/model102/pop9.html

I don´t know if this problem is also relevant on subsonic planes; But helicopter rotors are known to pick up static electricity while they are moving through the air.

So this unpainted area below the airbus door might be used to discharge the fuselage in a controlled way in order to spare an unsuspecting passenger...
Seems a little small for mechanical protection.

Do jetways usually have brush contacts in this area?
 
Notar520AC
Posts: 1517
Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2001 6:53 am

RE: Airliner Door Questions

Fri Aug 17, 2001 8:30 am

"Helicoper rotors tend to pick up static..."

Yes- they do. From a helicopter pilot, we have static discharge areas aft and fore on the fuselage. They're very small though- only about the size of a half dollar and are never covered.
BMW - The Ultimate Driving Machine

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests