cdfmxtech
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L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Wed Aug 29, 2001 9:22 am

Having never worked the aircraft as a technician, or flown it in the past 10 or so years - Someone remind of of what was so special about this aircraft. I used to like its look - 'till I discovered the DC10.

I here everyone so disappointed about its retirement....so what did it mean to u. I know I don't want to see the day when 737s and 757s are retired...but I probably won't see that in my lifetime - but then again who knows!!

 
Guest

RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Wed Aug 29, 2001 9:43 am

I don't know why people think the L-1011 is so special. Maybe because it's been around a long time??? I think what's even sadder is when the last 747 ever built is retired.
 
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DL_Mech
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RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Wed Aug 29, 2001 10:47 am

I can only compare the L-1011 to the MD-11, but most people that have worked the 10 and 11 say they are somewhat similar......For Me...

The L-1011 has the best manuals.....The FIM has diagrams and schematics everywhere, while the MD-11's is practically non-existant. I do like the Douglas LAMM manuals though......

The L-1011 is easy to work on....Everything has a Cannonplug on it (Douglas has lots of screw terminals on electrical stuff) and fuel probes can be changed without getting in the tank (they pull out of the top of the wing). Gear changes on the L-10 take a week...The MD-11 takes us three weeks.

To be fair to the MD-11, Honeywell did a nice job on the cockpit and C&D interiors did a nice job on the PSU's and ceiling panels. L-1011 ceiling panels are a real pain....

#2 engine access......I'm not gonna go there...

Wing Spar cracks......I'm not gonna go there either...

The L-1011 is one of the best landing aircraft out there....The Direct Lift Control uses the spoilers to kill lift on the wing during approach while maintaining a constant pitch angle. The four hydraulic systems were required for the FAA to certify the flying stabilizer...I doubt that the Lockheed engineers ever imagined that that fourth system would ever save an airplane.....

As far as looks go, I think both planes are about the same.

L-1011 spares are getting hard to come by these days, so the plane gets a poor reliability reputation because most of the spare parts are Sh##.

This plane is built to withstand anything... except a bad pilot.
 
JETPILOT
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RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Wed Aug 29, 2001 10:59 am

Locheed overbuilt everything on that plane.

As said you have to love the DLC and the "all flying" stab.

The autoland was state of the art at the time it was certified.

It is also considered the safest plane in the skies.

JET
 
concorde1518
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RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Wed Aug 29, 2001 1:04 pm

I like everything about it, it's looks, performance capabilities, comfort (in my opinion) and cockpit. The DC-10 is just a little too bland for me. Next to Concorde, it is my favorite airplane.
 
cdfmxtech
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RE: L1011:

Wed Aug 29, 2001 11:28 pm

What is the flying stabilizer...never heard of that term??
 
flight152
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RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Thu Aug 30, 2001 12:28 am

A Flying stablizer is an all moving one.

With regards to the L1011, its saftey record speaks for itself.
 
Boeingfan
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RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Thu Aug 30, 2001 2:21 am

Speed, capacity and lower cabin noise level was the claim to fame for the L-1011. For its time the L 1011, had very advanced avionics and controls.

The L 1011 differed from the DC 10 in that the no. 1 and 3 engines where hung on the wing further out toward wing tips than the D10. (Supposedly for cabin noise?)

In later years we referred to them as "hanger princess's" if there was a hanger, they made a bee line for it. They were pretty "rattly" on take off towards the end of her era. But a very good aircraft for its time.

Seriously a very comfortable passenger aircraft with an elevator to the lower galley.
 
Guest

RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Thu Aug 30, 2001 3:56 am

The 747 was more of a breakthrough than the Lockheed Tristar ever was! She's known as the Queen of the Skies for a reason.  Laugh out loud
 
cdfmxtech
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RE: L1011:

Thu Aug 30, 2001 4:19 am

Newflash Flight152:
Most planes that have a stabilizer ie 737, 757 that is trimable.

So I ask once again, what is a flying stab
 
Guest

RE: L1011:

Thu Aug 30, 2001 4:27 am

I think Flight152 is referring to the elevator controls...
 
Guest

RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Thu Aug 30, 2001 4:29 am

A Flying stablizer is an all moving one.

I've been trying to figure this out, and I'm quite stuck.

A flying stabilizer... good grief!
 
cdfmxtech
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RE: L1011 - To DL_Mech

Thu Aug 30, 2001 4:33 am

OK...I just read something about the "All-Flying Stab".

Now on to the technical description of the L-1011 pitch control system. The L-1011 incorporates an all-flying horizontal stablizer to control movement in the pitch axis. This "all flying tail" is unique in the commercial aircraft industry. First of all, pitch control on most airplanes are usually controlled by elevators - on the L-1011 however, the primary part of the tail that controls pitch is the front part called the horizontal stablizer, the leading edge of which which move up and down - the elevators are attached to the rear spar of this movable stablizer piece - the elevators do move, yes, but not under direct pilot control. The elevators move as a direct result of stablizer movement only via a physical mechanical link: When the stablizer moves it's nose downward, the elevators deflect upward to increase the camber of the entire tail - this causes a downward moment and thus pulls the entire rear portion of the aircraft in a downward direction - this causes the nose of the aircraft to pitch up. When the pilot pushes the control wheel forward, this causes the stablizer nose to move up, causing the elevators to deflect downward, increasing the camber effect to cause a lifting moment and thus pull the tail of the aircraft upward and this in turn causes the nose to pitch down.

IF THIS IS TRUE...then does the L1011 incorporate a Stabilizer Trim system??
 
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RE: Cdfmxtech

Thu Aug 30, 2001 4:35 am

Thanks! I just learned something! Big grin
 
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DL_Mech
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RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Thu Aug 30, 2001 7:19 am

Sorry for the late reply.....Yes, the L-1011 has a stabilizer trim system......It is moved by using the thumbwheels on the control wheel, or by moving the large control wheels on the pedestal (similar to Boeing). Stabilizer trim is measured from 0-10 units, with 10 units being lots of ANU (aircraft nose up/stabilizer leading edge down) trim.
This plane is built to withstand anything... except a bad pilot.
 
cdfmxtech
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RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Thu Aug 30, 2001 8:51 am

DLmech

So without getting to involved with this here...ok sorry I have to
If the stab is the primary menas of pitch control, and the elevator are slaved to the operation of the....is the any kind of neutral shift mechanisms??

I mean, most aircraft that I know when trimmed by the stab will have the elev change its neutral position. So if the stab on the L10 is always moving...either by pitch control (normal) or stab trim - there has to be a way of getting the elev neutral.

I know I spit out alot there..but hopefully u know what I'm getting at
 
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DL_Mech
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RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Thu Aug 30, 2001 10:16 am

No neutral shift here....The elevators are mechanically linked to stabilizer motion. You only see the elevators deflect upward at full ANU position. The elevators remain faired during most of the stabilizer travel. I can't seem to recall that they deflect at full AND (aircraft nose down)........
This plane is built to withstand anything... except a bad pilot.
 
Minuteman
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RE: L1011: What's So Special About The Aircraft?

Thu Aug 30, 2001 11:56 am

This sounds a lot like the anti-servo tabs on the Piper Cherokees I fly. Movement of the yoke causes the entire horizontal stabilizer surface to move, with a tab at the back deflecting in the same direction as the stab. (that is, a clockwise rotation of the stab will cause a similar clockwise rotation of the tab on its own axis at the back of the stab, parallel to the stab's axis).

I suspect the addition of the elevator surfaces to the "stabilator" are there in the unlikely case of a total hydraulic failure...the tabs should center the stabilator when the hyd. actuators go into a damping mode. How you control pitch after that is anyone's guess...underslung engines?

I don't know much about the L-1011, but I get the idea that the 11 was quite sophisticated systems-wise for its time (avionics, flight controls, troubleshooting, etc.)...the 777 of its time: not pushing any limits on capacity or range, but a big step for creating an ideal grocery-getter for the airlines.

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