salim
Posts: 301
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2001 3:27 pm

Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 1:49 am

When do you turn on a modern airliner, do you just use the yoke or also the peadle?
what do you use aileron, elevator, the tail? two of them? all?
thanks
and excuse me for my bad english
 
XFSUgimpLB41X
Posts: 3960
Joined: Fri Aug 25, 2000 1:18 am

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 2:16 am

There is a tiller on the captain's side that acts like a steering wheel on the ground. The rudders do turn the nose wheel to a limited degree for use on the runway.
Chicks dig winglets.
 
salim
Posts: 301
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2001 3:27 pm

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 2:21 am

thank you but i mean in the air
thanks
 
goboeing
Posts: 2429
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2000 5:31 am

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 7:44 am

In the air both.

Nick
 
Mr Spaceman
Posts: 2723
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2001 5:09 am

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 9:04 am

Hi Salim.

On an airliner, the pilots can "Bank" the aircraft into a turn by using the ailerons (turning the control column wheel), or you can "Yaw" it into a turn using the rudder (pushing your feet on the rudder pedals). However, in order to make the turn co-ordinated (meaning a turn without slipping or sliding), the pilots move both the ailerons and the rudder at the same time.

I hope this helps.

Chris  Smile
"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
 
Guest

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 9:06 am

Salim,

You're not planning anything, are you?  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

Sorry, after everything that's been happening, I'm a little paranoid.
 
XFSUgimpLB41X
Posts: 3960
Joined: Fri Aug 25, 2000 1:18 am

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 9:08 am

Well if he doenst know how to turn one yet, hes got a ways to go.  Big grin
Chicks dig winglets.
 
Guest

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 9:20 am

Wasn't that all the hijackers needed to know?
 
mirrodie
Posts: 6789
Joined: Wed Apr 19, 2000 3:33 am

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 9:37 am

with a name like that and you dopes tell him, huh?
Forum moderator 2001-2010; He's a pedantic, pontificating, pretentious bastard, a belligerent old fart, a worthless st
 
ryu2
Posts: 1546
Joined: Tue Aug 06, 2002 8:18 am

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 10:06 am

A bit of racial profiling here?
 
RyDawg82
Posts: 833
Joined: Fri Sep 14, 2001 8:30 am

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 10:27 am

We do not have time to pull this stuff in here, we all come here to ask questions and to learn....Im sorry theres so much info on the web.....I was able to find a complete handbook for the 767 in seconds online.....Much greater detail exists elsewhere...Dont make this site petty by pointing fingers and playing the "name game" theres just no time for it...Ry
You can take the pup out of Alaska, but you can't take the Alaska out of the pup.
 
salim
Posts: 301
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2001 3:27 pm

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Tue Sep 18, 2001 3:07 pm

But on a modern aircraft aren't the aileron and the rudder auto coordinate?
i mean if you turn the control column wheel, it doesn't turn also the rudder? on a 320 for example?
thanks
 
Mr Spaceman
Posts: 2723
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2001 5:09 am

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Wed Sep 19, 2001 4:01 am

Hi Salim.

I would not be surprised if modern airliners do have the ability to couple the rudder and ailerons together. However, I believe the pilots would have to be able to dis-engage a coupled system in order to fight a crosswind on final approach.

For example: Lets say the pilots of an airliner (or any aircraft) are on final approach, and they have a quartering front crosswind from the right at an angle of 50 degress to the direction of flight. The pilots would have to either "crab" into the wind using right rudder (with a little left aileron input), in order to track the runway centerline, or they could perform a "forward slip" using RIGHT aileron and LEFT rudder (cross controlled) to stay on the rwy heading. I myself use both of these techniques to fight a crosswind during final...as do most pilots.

As you can see...in this example, the ailerons and rudder could not be coupled, they would need to be independent.

Perhaps an airline pilot in the forum can let us know how their aircraft works in this area.

Chris  Smile

"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
 
310_engineer
Posts: 163
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2000 7:16 am

RE: Turn On An Airliner

Thu Sep 20, 2001 7:01 am

Hi all,
To provide the turn-coordination there is a yaw damper.
This deflects the rudder in a coordinated turn. The rudder deflections are very small in this case and also the rudder pedals do not move along.
To compute the deflection the yaw damper gets its information from accelerometers and/or IRS.
Also the yaw damper deflects the rudder in case of an engine faillure to compansate.

JetBlue-320, XFSUgimpLB41X and Mirrodie was that really necessary? I suggest an apology.

All the best
Mike

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