doug_or
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Cobmi Vs. Quick Change

Tue Oct 09, 2001 1:29 am

Various arilners have been built as or converted into combi or quick change frieghters. I was under the impression that combis can carry upper deck cans/pallets and pax, while QCs can be changed between passenger and freight layouts. How long does this operation generaly take? can most Combis carry a varying amount of cargo vs. PAX? is a convertable frighter the same as a quick change?

Thanks,
Doug in KPDX
When in doubt, one B pump off
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Cobmi Vs. Quick Change

Tue Oct 09, 2001 2:13 am

The B737-200C was a combi which could be used for only cargo,cargo-pax or only pax, this was possible by removing seat rows individually & replacement by lashing nets.

The B737-200QC called the Quick change assy, had rows of seats normally 2 or 3 depending on the seat pitch on each pallet assy.similiar pallet assy without seat rows but with cargo loaded was used for cargo carriage.
The advantage was the aircraft could be converted from cargo to pax version in min 30 minutes flat.It used to carry 8-9 pallet assys.
regds
HAWK.
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
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RE: Cobmi Vs. Quick Change

Tue Oct 09, 2001 9:52 am

Some UPS 727's were equiped to have seats and galleys put in for passenger service wich they do have or did. They served hot meals and everything. I dunno if they still have it though. Have to ask DE727UPS.

Eric
 
L-188
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RE: Cobmi Vs. Quick Change

Tue Oct 09, 2001 5:57 pm

Hawk21M has it right

When I was working at Reeve their 727-100's could either be a combi or a QC depending on what kit was put in.

Either kit could be put in either aircraft.


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Basicly the way the aircraft where configured was that you had (If I remember correctly) 44 seats that where bolted to the floor up to the forward overwing exit. In just the simple combi version you would bolt the appropriate rows of seats into the aircraft to come up with the 56,66 or 110 seating configuration that was needed. In order to do this you would have to take out the cargo rollers and place the carpets and the closet that where required also.


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With the quick change seats none of the cargo handling equiptment had to be removed, except for the barrier net in the 110 seat version. You just slid the pallets with the seats into place and they locked into place on the floor.


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Reeve also flew their 727's as a 7 pallet freighter. In that case all of the seats in the aft half of the aircraft had to be removed.


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The have hour estimate is the slowest time for getting an aircraft from say an all-seat to an all-pax setup. I didn't have to do conversions at Reeve but when I was at Alaska I did them on their 737-200QC's. If you where just moving from say a 2 to 3 pallet setup, that job could be done much much faster. Say 10 minutes max.


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doug_or
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RE: Cobmi Vs. Quick Change

Wed Oct 10, 2001 9:01 am

so are the pallets with seats just like cargo pallets? did the locks then come up above the floor in the passenger area?

thanks for all replys,
Doug, on the ramp at PDX
When in doubt, one B pump off
 
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RE: Cobmi Vs. Quick Change

Wed Oct 10, 2001 3:24 pm

The seat pallets are almost like military boards. The are carpeted and have the rails for the seats built into them.


On the typical full sized seat pallets that I had to deal with there where four rows of seats two on each side
There where eight locks that are located on the pallet four between the two rows of seats and four on the tail end of the pallet. They lock into special locks on the floor. When I was working with the Reeve 727's they where a seperate piece of gear that screwed into the aircraft's tie down system. On the Alaska 737's they where built onto the normal locks. Anyway you have to be carefull when latching them down because they do have a tendancy not to lock if they aren't lined up.

There are also spacer pallets and half pallets that are sometimes needed to make a particular combination work. Also the work has to be signed off by a mechanic.
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