Mr. Mof
Topic Author
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:35 am

Landing Into The Wind

Fri Aug 02, 2002 9:43 pm

As I few aircraft landing and taking off from EWR, I notice as the winds change, so do the ways that the aircraft land and take off. Is this the way it is done eveywhere...of course where possible...and what do they do under calm wind conditions? I can always tell the way the wind is blowing when I see those big birds flying south to EWR over Giants' Stadium!
 
jwenting
Posts: 9973
Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2001 10:12 pm

RE: Landing Into The Wind

Fri Aug 02, 2002 9:57 pm

Normal practice.
Landing (and starting) into the wind is safer and more economical.

If possible, airports will use runways so that aircraft have the best possible headwind (there are exceptions, like Schiphol (AMS) where under government orders noise abatement procedures are more important than safety. This has caused accidents).
I wish I were flying
 
cfalk
Posts: 10221
Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2000 6:38 pm

RE: Landing Into The Wind

Fri Aug 02, 2002 10:05 pm

Typically, if the wind is calm, or less than 5 knots or so, the airport will transfer activities to the runway which causes the least noise pollution to the surrounding area. This may also take into account several aspects including things like who's-living-where. In Geneva for example, where there is only one runway, They will generally use runway 23 if they can, and only switch to the reciprical 05 heading when the winds require, as takeoffs on 05 make a lot of noise over some pretty nice lake-front properties, while 23 causes noise over mainly industrial areas and lower-income housing.

Other airports with multiple runways might "share the noise", with one runway being used for a while, and switching to another later in the day. I think I heard that Heathrow or CDG do something like this.

Charles
The only thing you should feel when shooting a terrorist: Recoil.
 
Mr. Mof
Topic Author
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:35 am

RE: Landing Into The Wind

Fri Aug 02, 2002 10:19 pm

I figured as much. I live north of EWR ... and so do lots of others in Jersey. When the winds come from the north, there is a lot of noise (good noise, of course). I do believe the area south of EWR is less residential and also believe that they favor planes departing that way in calm winds. THANKS
 
dripstick
Posts: 2320
Joined: Sat Dec 01, 2001 9:43 am

RE: Landing Into The Wind

Sat Aug 03, 2002 1:01 am

What is a "calm wind"?  Smile/happy/getting dizzy
What's another word for thesaurus?
 
Dalmd88
Posts: 2390
Joined: Fri Jul 28, 2000 3:19 am

RE: Landing Into The Wind

Sat Aug 03, 2002 1:24 am

During a calm wind day traffic flow is also a factor in determining the active runway. During those days ATL always runs east to west. The contollers can move more traffic through the airspace in that direction. It has a lot to do with the inbound flow from the northeast. In the NYC area the flow most likely has an optimum direction for a calm day.
 
dragogoalie
Posts: 1172
Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2001 3:58 pm

RE: Landing Into The Wind

Sat Aug 03, 2002 1:30 am

Calm wind = no wind

--dragogoalie-#88--
Formerly known as Jap. Srsly. AUSTRALIA: 2 days!
 
Guest

RE: Landing Into The Wind

Sat Aug 03, 2002 1:38 am

Please excuse me, but this reminds me of the old joke...

Q. What's the difference between a helicopter pilot and a fixed-wing pilot?
A. A fixed-wing pilot breaks ground and flys into the wind; a helicopter pilot breaks wind and flys into the ground.

Jetguy
 
Ralgha
Posts: 1589
Joined: Tue Nov 09, 1999 6:20 pm

RE: Landing Into The Wind

Sun Aug 04, 2002 4:08 pm

Calm wind is generally any wind less than 5 knots, though it varies from airport to airport. 3 knots is also popular, though less so than 5.

Landing into the wind is safer because your groundspeed is lower. Lower ground speed = less energy needed to stop the airplane from that speed (or get the airplane to that speed on takeoff).
 Big thumbs up
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FredT
Posts: 2166
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2002 9:51 pm

RE: Landing Into The Wind

Sat Aug 10, 2002 11:14 pm

"Landing into the wind is safer because your groundspeed is lower. Lower ground speed = less energy needed to stop the airplane from that speed (or get the airplane to that speed on takeoff)."

Which effectively translates to less runway required - or a higher allowed weight, which means increased revenues.

Cheers,
Fred
I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
 
Guest

RE: Landing Into The Wind

Sun Aug 11, 2002 5:41 am

All transport airplanes that I know of, are certificated for takeoff and landing with 10 knots tailwind... be aware that if I dont like a particular runway for takeoff because of the wind conditions, I will state so with the controller, i.e. "requesting runway xx due to weight"... and in Schiphol, their revenge will be to delay your departure 30 minutes or so...
(s) Skipper

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