CloudNine
Topic Author
Posts: 65
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2001 12:23 pm

Climbout Rate

Mon Jan 20, 2003 7:31 am

I live in the midwest area of the U.S.,with a commercial airport that sees only a moderate amout of departures. I've noticed a number of Southwest(733) & American(MD80) aircraft Departing at what appears to be extreme angle's. My actual question is," what is the typical to extreme rate ft. per minute climbout for most commercial flights"?. In afterthought, how is the rate per minute of decent figured out on approach to you destination?. The later question is under typical or normal situations. Thanks, and hope I have'nt confused anyone.
 
Guest

RE: Climbout Rate

Wed Jan 22, 2003 8:23 am

Dear Cloud9 -
xxx
The "maximum angle" for climb out on takeoff is generally 20 degrees for all airplanes that I know (and/or airline operation policies) - airlines refrain from "acrobatic flying" as you may realize... And 20 degrees, would be a faily light weight aircraft...
xxx
On a heavily loaded 747, the other extreme, the attitude angle is 13 degrees after takeoff for the initial climb speed...
xxx
So we say 12-13 degrees (heavy) and 20 degrees (light aircraft)...
xxx
Rate of descent, typical ILS is 750 to 800 feet/minute - visual approaches generally around these numbers, but could go to... say 1,000 feet/minute...
Happy contrails  Smile
(s) Skipper
 
rendezvous
Posts: 531
Joined: Sun May 20, 2001 9:14 pm

RE: Climbout Rate

Thu Jan 23, 2003 11:37 am

Just another similar question...

I know this is very dependent on all the variables, but what sort of figure are we looking at for initial rate of climb on the 747 and 777?
 
Mr.BA
Posts: 3310
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2000 12:26 pm

RE: Climbout Rate

Thu Jan 23, 2003 12:15 pm

G'day Rendezvous,

Climb rates really depends on many many factors which include temperature, weight, thrust settings, speed... etc. For the B747-400, at light weights it should be 3000-4000fpm while at medium weights 2000 and heavy 1000fpm.

This is just a very very rough figure.

Cheers,

alvin

PS/Skipper is the man to ask when it comes to the B747s  Smile
Boeing747 万岁!
 
411A
Posts: 1788
Joined: Mon Nov 12, 2001 10:34 am

RE: Climbout Rate

Thu Jan 23, 2003 12:45 pm

On the other hand, with older types (B707 for example), it can be rather interesting.
Recall departing DHA one night, max weight...and was only able to climb at V2/400 feet per minute, due to 20,000 pound error (found out later) in the loadsheet.
First Officer (pilot flying) had eyes big as dinner plates.
Sure glad one engine didn't quit..... Wow!
 
Guest

RE: Climbout Rate

Fri Jan 24, 2003 9:23 am

Regarding climbout rates... jet transport aircraft...
All that comes from FAR/JAR Part 25...
xxx
The "second segment climb" (gear retraction height until reaching 400 feet with one engine failed) is the "yardstick" for aircraft performance climbout rate in certification...
xxx
2 engine airplanes, i.e. a 737, must be able to maintain a climb gradient of 2.4%...
3 engine airplanes, i.e. a DC-10, be able to maintain a climb gradient of 2.7%...
4 engine airplanes, i.e. a 747, be able to maintain a climb gradient of 3.0%...
xxx
Based on that, you can see that a 2 engine aircraft would be inherently with much better "all engine" performance, since they are designed to climb with one engine out (one still operating) at a gradient of 2.4%... yet having lost half of their power... if you compare to a 3 engine (lost only 33.3% of its power), or a 4 engine aircraft, 25% of its power...
xxx
All airplanes climbing out on "all engines" have spectacular performance... yet I know that "twin jets" probably have the most spectacular climb capability...
xxx
Is this a help to answer your questions...?
Happy contrails  Smile
(s) Skipper
 
rendezvous
Posts: 531
Joined: Sun May 20, 2001 9:14 pm

RE: Climbout Rate

Fri Jan 24, 2003 5:38 pm

Yep thanks
I know it's a hard one to give an answer to, because of all the variables.
I can't imagine climbing out in a fully laiden twin on one engine is very fun. Most probably the pilot would require a change of pants after?

 
Guest

RE: Climbout Rate

Sun Jan 26, 2003 11:06 am

My airline's top executives sometimes use a Learjet for their travel, and I get occasionally to fly that aircraft... at sea level and average weight, this little rocketship is capable of climbing at 1,000+ feet per minute on one engine, and I have seen some 6,000 feet per minute on VSI with both engines...
xxx
Somewhat of spectacular performance, shall we say...  Smile
(s) Skipper
 
rendezvous
Posts: 531
Joined: Sun May 20, 2001 9:14 pm

RE: Climbout Rate

Sun Jan 26, 2003 11:14 am

Now that must be fun!

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests