flyguy1
Posts: 1660
Joined: Wed Jun 23, 1999 9:45 am

Usage Of Term "heavy"

Mon Oct 13, 2003 9:14 am

I noticed from listening to Amsterdam ATC recently, that most of the widebody jets never use, or are referred to as heavy. Does the term heavy only get used in the USA? And do plans only use the term heavy at certain altitudes, when flying in US airspace?
727, L1011, MD80, A300, 777-200, 737-300, 737-700, 747-400, 757-200, 737-800, A320. E190, E135, 767-200, CRJ9
 
Woodreau
Posts: 1186
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2001 6:44 am

RE: Usage Of Term "heavy"

Mon Oct 13, 2003 9:40 am

Try this one http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/46271/4/

"Heavy" is spoken as part of the aircraft callsign only in the US.

Woodreau / KMVL
Bonus animus sit, ab experientia. Quod salvatum fuerit de malis usu venit judicium.
 
broke
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Joined: Wed Apr 24, 2002 8:04 pm

RE: Usage Of Term "heavy"

Mon Oct 13, 2003 10:26 am

The term "Heavy" applies to any airplane with a GTOW of 300,000 lbs or higher and the 757. The 757 is included due to incidents with smaller aircraft making approaches behind a 757.
 
XFSUgimpLB41X
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Joined: Fri Aug 25, 2000 1:18 am

RE: Usage Of Term "heavy"

Mon Oct 13, 2003 11:24 am

Actually its 255,000 pounds MGTOW.... 757-200 is not a heavy aircraft, but it does require larger separation than a standard "light" aircraft. The 757-300 is heavy.
Chicks dig winglets.
 
cancidas
Posts: 3985
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2003 7:34 am

RE: Usage Of Term "heavy"

Mon Oct 13, 2003 11:31 am

that is an ATC term so that they know how to space a/c. the only reason the 757-200 is considered heavy is that it creates the most problematic vortices.
"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
 
flyguy1
Posts: 1660
Joined: Wed Jun 23, 1999 9:45 am

RE: Usage Of Term "heavy"

Mon Oct 13, 2003 2:04 pm

Why is heavy not a universal atc term than?
727, L1011, MD80, A300, 777-200, 737-300, 737-700, 747-400, 757-200, 737-800, A320. E190, E135, 767-200, CRJ9
 
sxmarbury33
Posts: 405
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2000 5:41 am

RE: Usage Of Term "heavy"

Mon Oct 13, 2003 2:20 pm

The 757 does not carry the "heavy" callsign designation however for wake turb seperations ATC gives it the same legal seperation as a standard heavy. The 753 is heavy.
 
Airplanepics
Posts: 2590
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2003 4:12 am

RE: Usage Of Term "heavy"

Mon Oct 13, 2003 2:41 pm

"Heavy" is spoken as part of the aircraft callsign only in the US.


This is not true, when I was in ACE a few months ago, ATC used the callsign 'Heavy' for 757's upwards. The term heavy is used all over the world.

Airplanepics
Simon - London-Aviation.com
 
POSITIVE RATE
Posts: 2121
Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2001 11:31 am

RE: Usage Of Term "heavy"

Mon Oct 13, 2003 2:50 pm

The term heavy is used all over the world.

Nope it isn't. "Heavy" isn't used here in Australia for some reason and some European and possibly Asian countries either.
 
Contact_tower
Posts: 534
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2001 4:05 am

RE: Usage Of Term "heavy"

Mon Oct 13, 2003 9:55 pm

"Heavy" is used in most european countries as well. You only have to use it on first call/reply on new freq.
 
cfalk
Posts: 10221
Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2000 6:38 pm

RE: Usage Of Term "heavy"

Tue Oct 14, 2003 12:44 am

I was watching some ops in Geneva this weekend. I always assumed that there was a period of at least 2 minutes between a heavy and a lighter, single-aisle aircraft. But I saw Embraers and other small planes on the runway only 30 seconds to 1 minute after a 777, 747 and an A300-600 come through. What are the rules?

Charles
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