gordonsmall
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Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:41 am

Hi folks,

I know that many of the experienced guys on the forum such as Jetguy, Skipper, 411a and countless others have often mentioned books which they say every aviator should have a copy of.

What are the books which everyone, be they a 747 captain or a lowly C150 pilot keep handy?

I know many of them could be found with a quick search in the forum but maybe a single thread with the best of the best listed would be useful both now and in the future.

The usual stuff on aircraft performance, IFR flying, weather, tips and tricks etc - the sort of stuff that is useful (and often lifesaving) to us wannabe's and student pilots.  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

Regards,
Gordon.
Statistically, people who have had the most birthdays tend to live the longest.
 
goboeing
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 1:20 am

Here are ones that I have read so far and stand out as good ones:

Weather Flying (Bob Buck): Gives lots of tips and advice on flying through lots of different weather scenarios. The information is very useful and can be applied on your next flight.

Everything Explained for the Professional Pilot (Richie Lengel): Important information from the FARs and the AIM for those people in the USA. It's very readable and written by a pilot, for pilots.

The Pilot's Burden (Bob Buck): As the second part of the title says, "The roots of pilot error." Buck goes through changes in how pilots are trained to fly, changes in technology, and hazards.

Aerodynamics for the Naval Aviator: I still do not even come close to understanding everything in this book. It is very full of information.

Stick and Rudder (Wolfgang Langwiesche): This one everyone should read.

Nick
 
schooner
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 4:28 am

"Fate is the Hunter" by Ernest K Gann. Excellent stuff.
Untouched and Alive
 
fly727
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 4:57 am

Aviation Weather: By the Federal Aviation Administration? THE weather book for the aviator.

Handling the Big Jets: By D.P. Davies. Great source of information about jet transport flying qualities and characteristics of great use for the novice and highly experienced pilot.

The art of instrument flying: An excellent book which describes everything the Instrument rated pilot should know.

RM  Smile
There are no stupid questions... just stupid people!
 
fspilot747
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 5:00 am

I Learned About Flying From That (multiple volumes): The editors of FLYING Magazine.

I scour these at the bookstore whenever I get time. You can learn a lot from other people's mistakes, and that's never been more true.


FSP
 
QantasA332
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 5:32 am

Do the aerodynamics and aerospace engineering textbooks that I use count? Okay, I guess they're not your everyday useful book...  Laugh out loud

Cheers,
QantasA332
 
musang
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 9:10 am

There's one by Wolfgang Langerweische, hopefully spelt correctly, written about 40 years ago, about handling light aircraft in general, which sharpened me up when I got hold of it during my time as a GA instructor.

The title? Can't remember.

I highly recommend it though. Many were the pennies that dropped, and bright were the light bulbs that came on over my head as I read it.

I remember it as being almost a "Handling the Big Jets" for light aircraft, although less technical, and a very entertaining read.

Regards - Musang
 
Guest

RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 10:50 am

I made Weather Flying by Robert Buck and Instrument Flying by Richard Taylor mandatory reading for all of my instrument students after they have passed their checkride. They aren't the typical ground school textbooks; in fact, they contain little, if any, weather or instrument flying theory. Weather Flying discusses how to fly weather in the real world and Instrument Flying discusses how to fly the various instrument procedures in the real world. They are easy and enjoyable reads.

Most people, after getting their instrument rating, still have little or no idea how to safely use it. It can be pretty intimidating getting the first real IFR experience. Reading these books will go a very long way towards converting all of that theoretical knowledge that you learned in ground school and flight training to practical use. I've always felt that it would take several hundred hours of actual IFR experience to gain the practical knowledge and insight that these authors have put in these books.

I recommend them highly.

Jetguy

 
goboeing
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 11:21 am

Musang,
See my post at the top. It's Stick and Rudder by Wolfgang Langwiesche.

Nick
 
Guest

RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 11:33 am

In addition to Weather Flying and Instrument Flying, I would also highly recommend Pilot in Command by Paul A. Craig. It is a great book about Aeronautical Decision Making (ADM), and it completely changed the way I thought about flying. Definitely a must read!

'Speed
 
DeltaGuy
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:57 pm

"WE" By Charles Lindburgh....

"Lost Moon" by Jim Lovell...about the Apollo 13 incident...

"The Black Box"..not necessarily a classic, but is good to learn from other's mistakes.

DeltaGuy
"The cockpit, what is it?" "It's the little room in the front of the plane where the pilot sits, but that's not importan
 
Guest

RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 9:16 pm

Don't forget The Right Stuff, by Tom Wolfe. I loved the movie, but the book is much better.

'Speed
 
SlamClick
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu Mar 25, 2004 11:32 pm

Two major categories here. Textbooks read for information and fiction or nonfiction read for entertainment.

Textbooks:
Fly the Wing - Jim Webb ISU Press (Flying jet transports)
INTRODUCTION section of your Jeppesen manuals. Read this completely at least once, early in your career. You'll be the smartest guy in the crew lounge for a little while.

Fiction:
The Left Seat by Robert Serling
The High and the Mighty by Ernest K. Gann
Island in the Sky by Ernest K. Gann
airliners.net Tech/Ops Forum any post By SlamClick (self-deprecating humor)

Nonfiction: (autobiographical works etc.)
Pilot by Tony LeVier (Lockheed test pilot)
Carrying the Fire by Michael Collins (Apollo astronaut and more)
Serenade to the Big Bird by Bert Stiles (B-17 pilot)
Stranger to the Ground by Richard Bach (Flying an F-84 IFR over Europe)
Flights of Passage by Samuel Hynes (WWII Navy pilot)
Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine deSte. Exupery (literature on a flying theme)

That ought to get you started.
Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
 
msllsmith
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Fri Mar 26, 2004 8:34 am

All of my favorites have been mentioned, but one. Don't know who it's good for. Maybe everyone. But, it's sure good reading.

"Emergency! Crisis In The Cockpit" Stanley Stewart. (pub.McGraw Hill)

It includes accounts of among other things; An account of the Gimli Glider (all those other ratings may some day come back to save your a*s).

LLSmith
There's nothing more beautiful than flying into the dawn.
 
QantasA332
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Fri Mar 26, 2004 12:30 pm

On a more serious note than my last half-serious post, "The Air Pilot's Glossary and Reference Guide" by David Bruford (published by Airlife) is quite an excellent compilation of useful acronyms and various explanations. It is perhaps a little more for the enthusiast than the pilot, but still a very handy, complete book.

Cheers,
QantasA332
 
futureualpilot
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Fri Mar 26, 2004 12:36 pm

My first flight instructor gave my a book, Jonathan Livingston Seagull, by Richard Bach. Ive read it many times and it still is my favorite book of all time. Not much to do with how to fly/rules of flight but a good book none the less.

[Edited 2004-03-26 04:37:22]
Life is better when you surf.
 
Guest

RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Fri Mar 26, 2004 10:35 pm

I have just started reading The Spirit of St. Louis by Charles Lindburgh. I have not really gotten very far through it, but it is a good read so far.

'Speed
 
NightHawk117
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Sat Mar 27, 2004 1:12 am

I would suggest 'Every Man A Tiger' and 'Fighter Wing' by Tom Clancy.
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Illini_152
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Sat Mar 27, 2004 12:21 pm

Slamclick,

On a similar vein to some of your recomendataions:

"North Star Over My Shoulder" Robert Buck (the guy who wrote "Weather Flying, his autobiography.)

"Airman's Odyssey" Saint Ex. (A collection of 3 of his works, Wind, Sand and Stars, Night Flight, Flight to Arras)

"Forever Flying" Bob Hoover (A must for anyone who enjoyed "The Right Stuff")

"Fly Low, Fly Fast" (don't know the author, but it's a look inside Unlimited class air racing at Reno.)

"The Compleat Taildragger Pilot" Harvey S. Plourde (a must for anyone thinking of transitioning to conventional gear aircraft)
Happy contrails - I support B747Skipper and Jetguy
 
SlamClick
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Sun Mar 28, 2004 1:57 pm

Illini 152
"Fly Low, Fly Fast" was written by Robert Gandt. I think I'll have to read that. I've seen nearly every race at Reno since 1970. Even had a ride around the course in a P-51 once - it took a month to get the grin off my face. Still a great show!

Milt Thompson wrote a good book about the X-15 project, worth reading. He also flew one of the lifting bodies.

"Chickenhawk" by Robert Mason is a good account by a Vietnam helicopter pilot.

"A Gift of Wings" by Richard Bach is another one that is often overlooked. It is a collection of the short articles he wrote early in his career that showcase his talent and vision.


Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
 
Illini_152
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Sun Mar 28, 2004 2:06 pm

Slamclick

Thanks, I was too lazy to run upstairs and check the author on that one  Smile . One of these days I'd like to get out there to witness it first hand, especially after reading that book!

--
Mike
Happy contrails - I support B747Skipper and Jetguy
 
SlamClick
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Sun Mar 28, 2004 2:11 pm

Illini 152
I have a secret. I keep Google open in another window. I just did a quick search for it.  Smile

Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
 
9VSIO
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Wed May 02, 2007 4:42 pm

Anyone got a good one for CRM?
Me: (Lining up on final) I shall now select an aiming point. || Instructor: Well, I hope it's the runway...
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Wed May 02, 2007 10:42 pm

Flight without Formulae....AC Kermode.
regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
RaginMav
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu May 03, 2007 12:15 am

"Flight of Passage" by Rinker Buck, makes for an interesting and light read.
 
Tod
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu May 03, 2007 5:01 am

Blind Trust by John Nance

Tod
 
chksix
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Thu May 03, 2007 5:39 am

80 Knots To Mach 2 (Naval Aviator Mem.); Linnekin R
Feet Wet - Reflections Of A Carrier Pilot; Gillcrist P
The conveyor belt plane will fly
 
Fly2HMO
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Sun May 06, 2007 9:31 am

Quoting Goboeing (Reply 1):
Aerodynamics for the Naval Aviator:

Great book, a bit hard to digest though.

I can't believe nobody has mentioned:

FAR/AIM
Instrument Flying Handbook
Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
Aviation Weather
Aviation Weather Services
Aircraft weight and Balance
.

Oh I know why, they're all published by our beloved FAA 

But seriously, I find those FAA books really handy and easy to read for the most part.

Another one of my favorites is The Jet Engine, written by RR themselves.

Holy crap, I just noticed this thread is 3 years old lol

[Edited 2007-05-06 02:32:47]
 
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Scooter01
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Sun May 06, 2007 10:10 am

I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Richard Bach's book "Stranger to the ground" where he describes a flight from the London area to an airbase in southern France in an F-84 F. All the checkpoints and frequencies for the waypoints are listed so it makes a great trip for the simmers among us.

Another great flying book is "A Lonely Kind of War" by Marshall Harrison where he writes about his experiences as a FAC flying the OV-10 in Vietnam.

Both of these books have been described to me as "real as if I was in the cockpit" by a friend that ended his flying career as a Colonel commanding the Norwegian 331 Squadron flying the CF-104.

Scooter

[Edited 2007-05-06 03:27:49]
There is always a good reason to watch airplanes
 
PGNCS
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Mon May 07, 2007 2:08 am

"Fly the Wing." The book every pilot should read and re-read at every opportunity.
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Mon May 07, 2007 2:50 pm







regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
RaginMav
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Wed May 09, 2007 12:19 pm

Quoting Scooter01 (Reply 28):
Another great flying book is "A Lonely Kind of War" by Marshall Harrison where he writes about his experiences as a FAC flying the OV-10 in Vietnam

Amen! I forgot about that book. It is truly excellent... I may go re-read that one!
 
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SEPilot
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Wed May 09, 2007 8:15 pm

Quoting Schooner (Reply 2):
"Fate is the Hunter" by Ernest K Gann. Excellent stuff.

 checkmark   checkmark   checkmark 
One I think every pilot should read; one of my favorite books of all time. I cannot overemphasize how good it is.
The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
 
Starglider
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RE: Aviators Bookshelf - Required Reading.

Fri May 11, 2007 4:01 am

Quoting 9VSIO (Reply 22):
Anyone got a good one for CRM?

"Human Factors in Flight" by Frank H Hawkins


This excellent book is recommended for all pilots and cabin attendants, regulators, safety managers and aeronautical engineering students. Concise, clear and through view of the inner and outer working environment of an aviators life. Very well researched and documented in an easy to understand format, no technojargon to confuse the novice.

Required reading for any current or aspiring commercial pilots. Good use of informative and entertaining illustrations and graphs, not stuffy or boring. Up to date with current technology and encompasses history as well.

Human factors encompasses a wide range of knowledge, skills and attitudes including communications, situational awareness, problem solving, decision making, and teamwork.



Starglider

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