LHMark
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The Death Of Wing-warping

Wed Dec 15, 2004 1:11 am

The first method of roll control for powered flight was wing-warping. It was replaced by aileron control. What immediate advantages did ailerons jhave over the wing warping method?
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futureualpilot
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Joined: Thu May 25, 2000 10:52 am

RE: The Death Of Wing-warping

Wed Dec 15, 2004 1:36 am

I would guess less wires strung around and in the airflow, as well as less stress on the wings...when the whole wing does not have to move, but just a small portion Id say it will last longer. Im sure somebody will give you a better explanation but Im hungry!
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DeltaGuy
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Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2001 5:25 am

RE: The Death Of Wing-warping

Wed Dec 15, 2004 1:40 am

The first advantage that jumps out at me is reliabilty in controls....you deflect a certain amount of aileron, then you bring it back to center. Sounds like flexing the entire wing requires more force, and more force to bring back to neutral- plus you wouldn't be getting a terribly great roll rate. You were able to have a much better medium to control those surfaces to- a control stick in between your legs....think WWI biplane, think basic lol.

Second one I can think of would be structural stability.....if you tried to flex a 767 wing like the Wright Bros plane, it'd have to be flimsy as hell to be able to do that, and thus, less supportave of weight. The wright bros plane couldnt support much more than 2 bodies, and definately nothing on the wings as those had to be moved.

DeltaGuy
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SlamClick
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RE: The Death Of Wing-warping

Wed Dec 15, 2004 4:48 am

I'm pretty sure hinged surfaces made monoplanes possible. Hard to imagine gaining the leverage necessary to warp a wing without a biplane design.

Also, Wright flyer wing warping was the worst possible. It put the greatest twist out at the tips and the least amount inboard. If you could choose, you'd have more control throw inboard than at the tips.

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USAFMXOfficer
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RE: The Death Of Wing-warping

Wed Dec 15, 2004 7:43 am

Wing Warping is not dead.

The "Active Aeroelastic Wing" concept is being examined for use in the J-UCAS unmanned aerial attack aircraft. The X-45 and X-47 are the testbeds for the J-UCAS concept. Good website here: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/news/FactSheets/FS-061-DFRC.html

Here is some more information on this exciting concept:
"a high-tech adaptation of the Wright Brothers rudimentary "wing-warping" approach to aircraft flight control in the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) flight research program. The focus of AAW research is on developing and validating the concept of aircraft roll control by twisting a flexible wing on a full-size aircraft. The aerodynamic forces acting on the traditional aircraft control surfaces, such as ailerons and leading-edge flaps, will be used to twist a flexible wing to provide aircraft roll maneuvering control"
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LHMark
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RE: The Death Of Wing-warping

Wed Dec 15, 2004 8:20 am

SlamClick, the Fokker Eindecker (the dreaded "Fokker Scourge" of WWI), was a wing-warping monoplane.
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