yyzacguy
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What Material Is Used For Aircraft Engines?

Sun Dec 25, 2005 3:48 am

Was wondering if any one knows the material used for the engines of a 767. i thought it was titaniunm any 1 know???
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RichardPrice
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RE: What Material Is Used For Aircraft Engines?

Sun Dec 25, 2005 3:55 am

Depends on what part of the engine. Some is titanium.
 
saab2000
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RE: What Material Is Used For Aircraft Engines?

Sun Dec 25, 2005 3:59 am

Matter and anti-matter.

Everyone knows that!  Big grin

Sorry........... nobody loves a smarta$$ I guess.
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yyzacguy
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RE: What Material Is Used For Aircraft Engines?

Sun Dec 25, 2005 4:00 am

the outter skin the outside that portects the fans
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VirginFlyer
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RE: What Material Is Used For Aircraft Engines?

Sat Dec 31, 2005 12:55 pm

I've just moved this here from Civil Aviation - is anyone able to help out with an answer? Off the top of my head, it is some form of composite, possibly kevlar based, but I am not entirely sure of that, or of any finer details.

V/F
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PurdueAv2003
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RE: What Material Is Used For Aircraft Engines?

Sat Dec 31, 2005 1:12 pm

Quoting YYZACGUY (Reply 3):
the outter skin the outside that portects the fans

Are you talking about the fan case itself or the outer fan cowl? Also, which engine type?
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Starlionblue
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RE: What Material Is Used For Aircraft Engines?

Sat Dec 31, 2005 1:51 pm

The outer cowl is probably aluminum. It's basically an aerodynamic fairing so it just needs to be light and of the right shape. On the inside the materials of the case itself get more exotic the higher the temperature. I imagine around the fan it's just more aluminum since the air is not that warm. The turbine case is another matter.
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HAWK21M
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RE: What Material Is Used For Aircraft Engines?

Sat Dec 31, 2005 6:04 pm

Turbine & high temperature sections can use Titanium alloy.
Fan cases can be Aluminium alloy,Graphite Epoxy.
Kevlar Epoxy & other Fibreglass for other Areas depending on Temperature requirements.
regds
MEL
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fr8mech
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RE: What Material Is Used For Aircraft Engines?

Sat Dec 31, 2005 10:36 pm

There is an abraidable surface that the fan is shrouded by. This is a composite material that reminds me of those wax logs that you put in a fireplace, except a lot harder. Then you have the case, which is more than likely made of an aluminum alloy. On the exterior you have a kevlar wrap which has 2 purposes. Mechanical protection for the case and blade containment in the event of a radial failure.
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lightsaber
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RE: What Material Is Used For Aircraft Engines?

Fri Jan 06, 2006 1:18 pm

Quoting RichardPrice (Reply 1):
Depends on what part of the engine. Some is titanium.

This I can answer with some authority.

I'll start by expanding on Hawks answer

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 7):
Turbine & high temperature sections can use Titanium alloy.
Fan cases can be aluminum alloy,Graphite Epoxy.
Kevlar Epoxy & other Fibreglass for other Areas depending on Temperature requirements.

Low Compressor blades and rotors: Titanium. Low compressor blades could be aluminum, but no one wants to be the first to see how much quicker the softer metal wears than titanium.
High compressor: last stages of high compressor the blades must be nickel alloy. Earlier might be titanium. Too hot for Aluminum.
Nacelle: mostly Aluminum. Near compressor surge vents some titanium on certain engines.
Fan shroud: Aluminum with Kevlar overwrap around fan containment area. Fan guide vanes are usually aluminum too.
Turbine exhaust area of nacelle... will have to be a higher temp alloy. Since I don't know *exactly*, I'll punt this part. With temperatures could just be 316L, but this is my one guess.
Case: Inconel 71X family. (Pretty standard in the industry is Inconel 715, but not always) Needs to be Inconel family due to high combustor inlet temperatures.
Combustor sheet metal (cold side) almost always Inconel 625
Combustor hot side (panels): Either Hastalloy X or Haynes 230 or other proprietary metal (e.g. pwa1422).
Fuel injector stems: Usually Inconel 625, but I've seen other nickels.
Tubine inlet vane/high turbine: vendor proprietary single crystal nickel.
Turbine rotor: One of the few areas where cobalt based alloys still predominate, but I've seen Nickel ones too.
Low turbine: usually directionally solidified Nickel alloys (Crystals directionally aligned).
Once upon a time I even knew what the shafts were made from... but I cannot recall tonight.

Why all the different materials? Weight and cost. Single crystal nickel is about 3X the cost of directionally solidified nickel. Directionally solidified nickel is much more than regular vacuum cast nickel. Titanium is light, but pricey. Aluminum is cheap and fairly light. In newer engines expect to see more composites (e.g., aluminum in the fan shroud replaced with carbon fibre). Some materials are selected because they cast well (Inconel 715, Inconel 625), some because they are easy to form in sheet metal (Aluminum, Inconel 625), some for weldability, and some for their properties at high temperature.

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HAWK21M
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RE: What Material Is Used For Aircraft Engines?

Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:46 pm

Quoting Lightsaber (Reply 9):

Are you in Engine Manufacturing.Fantastic list  bigthumbsup 
Is there a problem of corrosion due using proximity of various materials.
regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)

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