miamiair
Posts: 4249
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2004 9:42 pm

767 Maintenance Planners SB 767-57A0101

Wed Mar 22, 2006 7:22 am

Hello to all...

I am trying to find out if there are any maintenance planners/technicians/engineers that are accomplishing the above referenced Service Bulletin.

This relates to the leading edge slats of the 767. Originally, SB 57A0039 addressed corrosion and disbond issues, and was specified by AD 93-14-19. 57A0039 called out for an inspection and that was it. There were other issues and more slats were found corroded; here comes 57A0057(supercedes 57A0039) which had two ways to comply and terminate the AD:one, replace the trailing edge wedge with a "production" or a new "PAA(Phosphoric Acid Anodize)" wedge; two, accomplish an ultrasonic and X-ray inspection, rework the edges of the core and that was the AMOC.

The PAA wedges were expensive and not available. The production wedges were, expensive, some were available. Not to mention you needed to rent the tool to properly locate the trailing edge, the fastener kit and other miscellaneous materials needed to complete the task. So once the trailing edge was replaced, the AD was terminated. If the operator installed the "Production" wedge, they were in for a surprise...

SB 57A0101 was recently released and it is more black and white. Basically, you need to install a new "PAA" wedge, or keep inspecting the slat trailing edge. If you purchased a "Production" wedge, you must now purchase the new "PAA" wedge, fastener kit etc... The installation of the PAA wedge will terminate the requirements of 57A0101. If not, you need to tap test or Ultrasonically inspect the trailing edges at various intervals depending on the group/configuration. To install a new PAA Wedge costs about 27,000.00 for the wedge, 4,600 for a fastener kit, 350.00 for the tool and about 6,000.00 in labor. So figure about 39,000 (paint, sealants, misc parts) multiplied by 10 (outboard slats) gives you 390,000.00; add 100,000.00 (inboard slats @ 50K each) and you have 490,000.00 to terminate the Service Bulletin.

Inspecting the slat consists of an ultrasonic inspection that a crew of two, working two shifts (32 hours) can probably accomplish in a day. Do this and you don't have to re-inspect for another thirty-six months.

After that long winded explanation, my questions is this: How many operators are terminating this SB?

How can a maintenance organization justify that cost?

If there is anyone familiar with this, I would like to read your comments.
Molon Labe - Proud member of SMASH
 
SFOMB67
Posts: 371
Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2005 1:20 pm

RE: 767 Maintenance Planners SB 767-57A0101

Wed Mar 22, 2006 3:13 pm

I believe we did this at UAL a number of years ago, on the 762 fleet, which has now been parked. I've been retired 3 years, so I don't have access to the SB. #'s. As I remember we removed all the slats and did an "ultrasound" insp on the wedges. If they were good, they got repotted on the ends and reinstalled. If bad, the wedge got replaced. We had an extra set of slats, so we had one to put on as the wedge replacement took several days. But like I said, we did this something like 6-7 years ago.

You also have to rerig a slat if you replace the wedge, and that's a nightmare until you get used to it. We actually went up to Boeing to see how they did it on the 767 assy line. THAT, was a huge help.
Not as easy as originally perceived
 
miamiair
Posts: 4249
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2004 9:42 pm

RE: 767 Maintenance Planners SB 767-57A0101

Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:21 pm

Quoting Sfomb67 (Reply 1):
You also have to rerig a slat if you replace the wedge,

I think having the slat out of rig, where the lower skin of the trailing edge wedge wears down to a knife edge over a large area of the span. This requires a flush repair that can only be accessed by going in thru the top skin. This means a repair on both the upper and top skins.
Molon Labe - Proud member of SMASH
 
SFOMB67
Posts: 371
Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2005 1:20 pm

RE: 767 Maintenance Planners SB 767-57A0101

Thu Mar 23, 2006 1:53 pm

Quoting Miamiair (Reply 2):
I think having the slat out of rig, where the lower skin of the trailing edge wedge wears down to a knife edge over a large area of the span. This requires a flush repair that can only be accessed by going in thru the top skin. This means a repair on both the upper and top skins.

I was only referring to rigging a slat per the MM, that has had the T/E wedge replaced as part of the S.B. (basically this is now a different slat) vs. if you remove it for the X-ray and ultrasonic insp for the S.B. and it's OK, we then reistalled it without going thru a complete rig chk.
I have seen several slat T/E's wearing hard on the upper wing surface, and generally it delams the slat wedge, but does little damage to the wing upper skin.
Not as easy as originally perceived

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