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AirPacific747
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How To Read An Airport Chart?

Wed Jun 07, 2006 10:52 pm

Can anyone please help me with this?
 
9V-SPJ
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Wed Jun 07, 2006 10:55 pm

Which particular airport chart? The one describing the runway and taxiway layout or the departure/arrival or approach charts?

9V-SPJ
 
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AirPacific747
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Wed Jun 07, 2006 11:05 pm

Quoting 9V-SPJ (Reply 1):
Which particular airport chart? The one describing the runway and taxiway layout or the departure/arrival or approach charts?

Both types of charts.
Edit: I read your post too fast

[Edited 2006-06-07 16:16:20]
 
David L
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Thu Jun 08, 2006 12:07 am

While you're waiting for help here, you could take a look at this for some explanations of part of an approach chart (note, it's a simulation site):

Approach Charts
 
bri2k1
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Thu Jun 08, 2006 12:20 am

You could start by getting one and looking at the legend. Every symbol, color, shading, notation, and everything else on the chart is clearly explained in the legend.

You're going to have to ask more specific questions if you want real help.
Position and hold
 
EMBQA
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Thu Jun 08, 2006 12:24 am

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 2):
Both types of charts.

There are more then just two....
"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
 
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AirPacific747
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Thu Jun 08, 2006 12:54 am

thanks for your help so far, everyone!
I just want to know how to use a chart as I am flightsimming quite often and want it to be even more realistic.
And I am planning on becoming a real world pilot in a few years, so it would be great with some knowledge about this for a future need.

[Edited 2006-06-07 17:57:09]
 
Mir
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Thu Jun 08, 2006 2:35 am

Well, an airport diagram is pretty self-explanatory. In the regular US ones, taxiways are shown in grey, and labeled with their identifying letters. Runways, terminals and other structures are shown in black. Runways have their lengths and widths printed next to them. Other landmarks are also on the chart (control tower, fire station, a VOR, etc.).

If you were to post a link to a chart with some more specific questions, it would be much easier to give a good explanation.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
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AirPacific747
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Thu Jun 08, 2006 3:20 am

Quoting Mir (Reply 7):

If you were to post a link to a chart with some more specific questions, it would be much easier to give a good explanation.

Well that is exactly why I am asking. I know nothing about airport charts. That is why I started this thread. Sorry for asking stupid questions, but we've all been newbies at some point, haven't we?
 
Mir
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Thu Jun 08, 2006 11:32 am

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 8):
Well that is exactly why I am asking. I know nothing about airport charts. That is why I started this thread. Sorry for asking stupid questions, but we've all been newbies at some point, haven't we?

Your question isn't stupid, it's just a bit unclear what exactly you're asking. In light of that, I'll go with a general description of the three main kinds of charts that you'll see:

1) Airport Diagrams (this one is for LGA: http://map.aeroplanner.com/plates/FaaPlates_pdfs/00289AD.PDF)

These are just top-down views of an airport that pilots use to find their way around an airport. Taxiways and ramps are shown in grey, with black labels. Runways and buildings are shown in black. There may also be notes as to procedures that are required for a certain airport.

2) Approach Plates (this one is the ILS to runway 22 at LGA: http://map.aeroplanner.com/plates/FaaPlates_pdfs/00289I22.PDF)

These contain all the information a pilot needs to fly an instrument approach. Refer to the link that David L posted for more information about them.

3) SID and STAR Charts: (this one is the MILTON STAR to LGA: http://map.aeroplanner.com/plates/FaaPlates_pdfs/00289MILTON.PDF)

These contain a textual and graphic descripton of how to fly a SID or STAR.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
Fly2HMO
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Thu Jun 08, 2006 1:13 pm

Mir, looks like the links you provided are dead.

But here's a link to useful stuff in the NACO website:

chart user guide"
http://www.naco.faa.gov/index.asp?xml=naco/online/aero_guide

Here you can look up approach charts for any airport in the US:
http://www.naco.faa.gov/digital_tpp....0606&eff=06-08-2006&end=07-06-2006
 
Mir
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Fri Jun 09, 2006 6:06 am

Quoting FLY2HMO (Reply 10):
Mir, looks like the links you provided are dead.

Yeah, I didn't mean for those parentheses to be in there.

Here they are again:

1: http://map.aeroplanner.com/plates/FaaPlates_pdfs/00289AD.PDF

2: http://map.aeroplanner.com/plates/FaaPlates_pdfs/00289I22.PDF

3: http://map.aeroplanner.com/plates/FaaPlates_pdfs/00289MILTON.PDF

That should fix it.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
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AirPacific747
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Fri Jun 09, 2006 6:25 pm

Quoting Mir (Reply 9):



Quoting FLY2HMO (Reply 10):



Quoting Mir (Reply 11):

Thankyou guys! I'll try to figure out how it works.
 
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Sat Jun 10, 2006 2:49 am

Quoting Mir (Reply 9):
1) Airport Diagrams (this one is for LGA: http://map.aeroplanner.com/plates/Fa...D.PDF

Where does it say special instructions for a 747 taxing at LGA as someone mentioned in the latest updated airport diagram for LGA?
 
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AirPacific747
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Sat Jun 10, 2006 7:18 pm

Quoting Mir (Reply 9):
2) Approach Plates (this one is the ILS to runway 22 at LGA: http://map.aeroplanner.com/plates/FaaPlates_pdfs/00289I22.PDF)

These contain all the information a pilot needs to fly an instrument approach. Refer to the link that David L posted for more information about them.

Map #1 is pretty straight forward I think, but on map #2 there are still quite a few things I don't get about this map. To the south of the airport (La Guardia) there is a circle where it says "225°" and in the middle of the circle it says "210K" and in the bottom of the circle it says "045°". Is this a holding pattern?

What are all the triangles all over the map with numbers below them?

There are two big arrows coming from the right of the map pointing away from the glide slope I think it is. One of them is called R-306 and the other one is called R-293. What do these arrows mean?

Thankyou all for your help so far! It is greatly appreciated!
 
David L
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Sat Jun 10, 2006 9:32 pm

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 14):
What are all the triangles all over the map with numbers below them?

I'm guessing the 1515 ft one just outside the 10 NM circle to the southwest is the Empire State Building.
 
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Sun Jun 11, 2006 2:50 am

Since you want to be a licensed pilot one day, may I suggest starting out on some self-study ground school? There are a lot of text books and computer based training courses out there that can guide you step by step... and depending on the training route you choose could even satisfy some ground training requirements! I suggest Jeppesen's "Guided Flight Discovery" series. It will step you through the basic knowledge required of a private pilot all the way to the intricacies of a commercial or ATP. Sporty's and King Schools put together some good CD-Rom and video stuff... and you can find it all online.
 
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AirPacific747
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Sun Jun 11, 2006 8:11 am

Quoting David L (Reply 15):
I'm guessing the 1515 ft one just outside the 10 NM circle to the southwest is the Empire State Building.

Thanks! That explains a lot! lol. Not used to high obstacles coming from a very very flat country :P

Quoting 727EMflyer (Reply 16):
Since you want to be a licensed pilot one day, may I suggest starting out on some self-study ground school? There are a lot of text books and computer based training courses out there that can guide you step by step... and depending on the training route you choose could even satisfy some ground training requirements! I suggest Jeppesen's "Guided Flight Discovery" series. It will step you through the basic knowledge required of a private pilot all the way to the intricacies of a commercial or ATP. Sporty's and King Schools put together some good CD-Rom and video stuff... and you can find it all online.

That is a good suggestion. I will look into it and concider buying it. My summer holiday starts in a week which leaves me with a golden opportunity for reading about becoming a pilot

Once again, thankyou everyone for your help this far!
 
corey07850
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Sun Jun 11, 2006 9:24 am

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 14):
Map #1 is pretty straight forward I think, but on map #2 there are still quite a few things I don't get about this map. To the south of the airport (La Guardia) there is a circle where it says "225�" and in the middle of the circle it says "210K" and in the bottom of the circle it says "045�". Is this a holding pattern?

Yes, that's a holding pattern...

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 14):

There are two big arrows coming from the right of the map pointing away from the glide slope I think it is. One of them is called R-306 and the other one is called R-293. What do these arrows mean?

Those are radials off different VOR's in the area. R-306 is the 306 degree radial off the Deer Park (DPK) VOR (the VOR is just east of the chart)... R-293 is the same except the 293 degree radial.... The intersection of these radials and Localizer course identifies different fixes on the approach. For example if you are on the ILS and centered on the localizer using a CDI/HSI and on another CDI/HSI you are shown as passing the 306 degree radial off the DPK VOR you are over the "YOMAN" Intersection... Sometimes you may hear pilots call tower with something like, "LGA tower, ExecJet 258 ILS 22, outside YOMAN"... Obviously the tower has radar, but with just that information they can tell where you are on the approach...
 
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AirPacific747
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Sun Jun 11, 2006 4:17 pm

Quoting Corey07850 (Reply 18):

Thanks! Then I have one more question which is kind of off topic, but I dont think it is enough to start another thread.

What does it mean when a pilot says "UA449 with oscar ready to taxi"

And what does it mean when the control tower says "UA449 hold short of zulu"?
 
NZ8800
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Sun Jun 11, 2006 6:26 pm

"Zulu" would be taxiway Z, that you are about to cross, so you hold there for another aeroplane to pass before being given the go-ahead to cross or turn onto Zulu.

Oscar - not sure, possibly part of the particular aircraft's registration? Or has already had push-back done, cleared to taxiway Oscar, and is confirming to Ground that they are ready to go.

You might also be interested in the AIP New Zealand charts at http://www.aip.net.nz/

In particular, I like the Whangarei RLLS chart at http://www.aip.net.nz/pdf/NZWR_46.1.pdf

Arriving aircraft fly in along the harbour from Whangarei heads and at 3.0 NM DME choose either runway 06 or runway 24. As you can see, RWY 06 - port arrival, flashing amber "gates" - parallel lights - show the start of the approach, and three steady amber lights show the way around and across the harbour, clear of obstacles, to the airport at Onerahi .

For runway 34 - similar but watch for the flashing red terrain limit lights (high ground) along the shoreline (and one in the harbour - I think an island) - and again, the flashing amber gates start the approach, curving around to show the safe approach towards Onerahi.

Otherwise you bank in the opposite direction closer to the airport as instructed. Due to the town of Onerahi surrounding the airport and the city of Whangarei 4NM NNW, final approach must be on the runway vectors.

Whangarei is an non-certificated (ie no regular 30+ passenger aircraft) uncontrolled airfield with regular Air New Zealand Beech 1900D services arriving and departing.
Lighting is pilot controlled, with VASI LIL RWY and REIL.

The NDB chart shows the high ground near Whangarei - note the mount of hills! It clearly shows the paths in and out, and the necessity of the NDBs and IFR in bad weather.
MDZWTA ~ Mobile Disaster Zone When Travelling Abroad
 
Tg 747-300
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Sun Jun 11, 2006 9:28 pm

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 19):
What does it mean when a pilot says "UA449 with oscar ready to taxi

By advising the controllers that you have Oscar ( could be any letter in the phonetical alphabeth) you let them know that you have listened to the ATIS ( Aerodrome terminal information system).

The ATIS is a recorded message that informs about the current weather, runways in use, NOTAMS etc. at the airport. Its normaly updated once an hour, or upon a change in officia weather reports for the aerodrome. To make sure you have the current ATIS every recording is given a "name" in form of one of the letters. like Oscar, Papa.....
intentionally left blank
 
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AirPacific747
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Mon Jun 12, 2006 2:52 am

Quoting NZ8800 (Reply 20):



Quoting Tg 747-300 (Reply 21):

Thankyou very much for your answers!! It all makes more sense now.
 
Mir
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Mon Jun 12, 2006 5:42 am

Quoting 777WT (Reply 13):
Where does it say special instructions for a 747 taxing at LGA as someone mentioned in the latest updated airport diagram for LGA?

It's in the A/FD, not the airport diagram.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
GE90110B1
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Fri Jun 30, 2006 3:59 am

I know the normal approach taught for getting a private license is to fly the entire length of the runway in the opposite direction that you will be landing or the "downwind leg." Then you make a right or left "base" turn and line up for final approach, is this the same procedure that big commercial aircraft use in big city airports or do they sometimes forgo the downwind leg and just line up from many miles away and land straight on. I ask because I live near a small airport that occasionally gets some 737's and a DC9 and 727 and none of these aircraft seem to fly a downwind leg, they just seem to fly straight all the way in without a base turn. Also, I see many large aircraft in other situations making pretty steep turns and just straightening out to line up on the runway at the last second. How do they calculate when to start the turn and end up at just the right altitude when they line up on the runway, it seems very treacherous to the casual observer. The Kai Tak rwy 13 approach is an example.
 
Mir
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Fri Jun 30, 2006 4:42 am

Quoting GE90110B1 (Reply 24):
I know the normal approach taught for getting a private license is to fly the entire length of the runway in the opposite direction that you will be landing or the "downwind leg." Then you make a right or left "base" turn and line up for final approach, is this the same procedure that big commercial aircraft use in big city airports or do they sometimes forgo the downwind leg and just line up from many miles away and land straight on.

It's not just commercial traffic that doesn't fly your standard traffic patterns - all IFR flights do. That means the airlines, but it also means general aviation traffic as well if they're operating under IFR. The way they approach the runway depends on where they're coming from. If they're pretty much aligned with the runway, it makes a lot more sense to just have them fly straight in. If they're coming in from the opposite direction, they will fly a downwind, base and final, but the pattern will be a lot bigger (downwind at least 5 miles away from the airport as opposed to the 1 mile that VFR flights use).

The shape of the pattern is generally not published anywhere - it's determined by ATC. Not to say that the procedures aren't well-established - fly into a certain airport a lot and you'll eventually know what to expect from ATC and when. But it's generally not on any approach chart, at least in the US.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
cptspeaking
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Fri Jun 30, 2006 10:16 am

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 14):

Map #1 is pretty straight forward I think, but on map #2 there are still quite a few things I don't get about this map. To the south of the airport (La Guardia) there is a circle where it says "225�" and in the middle of the circle it says "210K" and in the bottom of the circle it says "045�". Is this a holding pattern?

Yes, this is a "published hold". The 225 and 045 are the inbound and outbound headings (in a no-wind condition anyway), and the 210K is the suggested speed. In your training for your instrument rating, you are taught holding patterns. The objective is to fly an oval pattern with flat sides, making the inbound leg precisely 1 minute. This can get difficult when you've got quartering winds (or any wind for that matter...), impacting both your ground track and groundspeed.

I think its great that you're interested in all of this without even being in the process of getting your license yet. Sounds like me a few years ago  Smile The suggestions about getting a textbook and going over it are great ones. You'll learn a lot from them, and generally in much clearer terms than any of us here can give you.

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 19):

What does it mean when a pilot says "UA449 with oscar ready to taxi"

"Oscar" is the phonetic prefix for the current ATIS information. The ATIS is there to relieve controllers from having to relay wind, visibility, sky condition, active runway and approach information and any other pertinent facts to evey single aircraft they talk to. Instead, they broadcast a recording with all of this information and give it a code, in this case "Oscar". When the pilots are departing, they'll let the controller know that they have this information by telling them that they have "Oscar" or whatever the phonetic letter may be at the time. It saves a lot of effort and time for everybody.

Quoting GE90110B1 (Reply 24):
Also, I see many large aircraft in other situations making pretty steep turns and just straightening out to line up on the runway at the last second. How do they calculate when to start the turn and end up at just the right altitude when they line up on the runway, it seems very treacherous to the casual observer. The Kai Tak rwy 13 approach is an example.

LOTS and LOTS of practice and skill with a bit of luck mixed in every once in a while  Wink

Your CptSpeaking  wave 
...and don't call me Shirley!!
 
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AirPacific747
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Mon Jul 10, 2006 6:54 pm

Quoting CptSpeaking (Reply 26):

I think its great that you're interested in all of this without even being in the process of getting your license yet. Sounds like me a few years ago Smile The suggestions about getting a textbook and going over it are great ones. You'll learn a lot from them, and generally in much clearer terms than any of us here can give you.

Haha, well I have wanted to become a pilot since I was 6 years old  Smile I hope that I am able to. My father knows a former Airbus A320 pilot and he told me that I can borrow the books he used for his education which I am really looking forward to!  Smile

Quoting CptSpeaking (Reply 26):

"Oscar" is the phonetic prefix for the current ATIS information. The ATIS is there to relieve controllers from having to relay wind, visibility, sky condition, active runway and approach information and any other pertinent facts to evey single aircraft they talk to. Instead, they broadcast a recording with all of this information and give it a code, in this case "Oscar". When the pilots are departing, they'll let the controller know that they have this information by telling them that they have "Oscar" or whatever the phonetic letter may be at the time. It saves a lot of effort and time for everybody.

Thanks!  Smile
 
xjramper
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:53 pm

Quoting AirPacific747 (Reply 27):
Haha, well I have wanted to become a pilot since I was 6 years old Smile I hope that I am able to. My father knows a former Airbus A320 pilot and he told me that I can borrow the books he used for his education which I am really looking forward to!

I wish you luck with your flying adventures!! I am currently in the process of getting my multi commercial (obtaining both private and commercial around the same time) and I would never give back the 226 hours of flight time that I have accumulated thus far.

The only thing I would caution is that, while not much has changed, be cautious with information that is a few years old. The FAA likes to publish new or different things from time to time, especially in knowledge areas pertaining to private ratings or instrument add ons.

Happy Flying!

XJR
Look ma' no hands!
 
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AirPacific747
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RE: How To Read An Airport Chart?

Tue Jul 11, 2006 1:57 am

Quoting XJRamper (Reply 28):

I wish you luck with your flying adventures!! I am currently in the process of getting my multi commercial (obtaining both private and commercial around the same time) and I would never give back the 226 hours of flight time that I have accumulated thus far.

The only thing I would caution is that, while not much has changed, be cautious with information that is a few years old. The FAA likes to publish new or different things from time to time, especially in knowledge areas pertaining to private ratings or instrument add ons.

Thankyou for your advice!! I tried flying in a Glider a few days ago in France. Well I didn't fly it myself as I don't have a license. My pilot was a retired Air France 747-400 pilot
I would love to go flying in a glider again! It was soo much fun!

and btw good luck with your education too! Wish it was me!  Smile

[Edited 2006-07-10 19:24:08]

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