Avro85
Topic Author
Posts: 236
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2005 4:35 am

Flap Track Systems

Sat Oct 14, 2006 9:25 pm

I'm currently doing my master thesis at my university and I'm working on flap track systems. If anyone has pictures of currently existing flap track system, could he/she please share them with me ?

On a side note, in june 2007 I will graduate as a mechnaical engineer in Belgium with a specilisation in aeronautics.
My home university told me a couple of days ago that I would get the opportunity to go to the US for an additional 1 year of studies. (everything would be paid for me)

Now my problem is I don't know the universities in the US very well. Can someone tell me which universities offer programs which last one year and where one can specialize after the Master ? I would be interested in aerospace/mechanics And which ones are the best ?

Many thanks for all the help.

Chris

EDIT: typo

[Edited 2006-10-14 14:26:26]
 
N231YE
Posts: 2620
Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2006 9:24 am

RE: Flap Track Systems

Sat Oct 14, 2006 10:50 pm

http://www.rbogash.com/DSCF4244.JPG

http://www.rbogash.com/DSCF3776.JPG

http://www.rbogash.com/meeting.html

>>>Hopefully JetMech will see this as he posts good photos
 
Avro85
Topic Author
Posts: 236
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2005 4:35 am

RE: Flap Track Systems

Sun Oct 15, 2006 5:46 am

Thanks for your help N231YE  Smile
 
2H4
Posts: 7960
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RE: Flap Track Systems

Sun Oct 15, 2006 8:25 am




Quoting Avro85 (Thread starter):
If anyone has pictures of currently existing flap track system, could he/she please share them with me ?

In my opinion, the most beautifully-designed flap track systems are those of Gulfstreams. The Gulfstream wing has no external flap tracks...everything is hidden inside of the wing:


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Photo © Gary Chambers
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Photo © Carlos Aleman - SJU Aviation Photography




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Photo © Gerhard Vysocan - Aviation Art Photography
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Photo © Andy Walker






Here's a look inside:


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Photo © Tomás Coelho - AirTeamImages






...And here's a look at how perfectly clean the wing is with the flaps retracted:


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Photo © Torin Wilson
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Photo © John padgett




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Photo © D. Chris Gentry
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Photo © Miguel Cláudio





2H4


Intentionally Left Blank
 
2H4
Posts: 7960
Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2004 11:11 pm

RE: Flap Track Systems

Sun Oct 15, 2006 1:20 pm



Here's a close-up of the B-52 flaps:

http://i10.tinypic.com/35b8ae1.jpg




2H4


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jetmech
Posts: 2316
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 2:14 am

RE: Flap Track Systems

Sun Oct 15, 2006 2:59 pm

Quoting N231YE (Reply 1):
Hopefully JetMech will see this as he posts good photos

No guarantees, but I'll see what I can do  Smile. Unfortunately, the opportunity to see a parked 747 with it's flaps down is somewhat rare at the terminal. I presume you would prefer photos of a 747 flap system? Don't quote me on this, but I seem to remember that the 777 / 767 and A330 / A340 flap systems are based on linkage mechanisms rotated by massive rotary actuators  Confused.
JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair :shock: .
 
aeroweanie
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RE: Flap Track Systems

Mon Oct 16, 2006 6:52 am

 
roseflyer
Posts: 9606
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2004 9:34 am

RE: Flap Track Systems

Tue Oct 17, 2006 11:17 am

I actually work for the company that makes the actuation systems that control most flap systems on jets. I don't work in that area myself, but I'm a Mechanical Engineer working in aerospace for the time being. Let me know if you have any specific questions about what it is like working in aerospace. It's a great industry and it is really motivating to know that the parts you work on go into the planes that you get to fly on.

A really good university that is known throughout the country and has a great program is Purdue University in Indiana. It isn't a particularly nice part of the country, but it would be a great opportunity to get in to aerospace companies. They really are spread out all over the country. There are some concentrations in certain parts of the country. Obviously Seattle with Boeing and Los Angeles with many companies. The Northeast has a lot with United Technologies and General Electric. The states surrounding Chicago have a lot of business with Boeing, Rolls Royce, and other companies. Overall, you want to go to a school with a name and one that is located in the backyard of aerospace companies if you want to get a job.

Now I don't know if you plan on emigrating to the United States, but it can be hard to get jobs in aerospace if you are a foreign national. Almost all the companies make components for both military and commercial programs and only US citizens can work on military programs for the most part. Companies are really biased obviously towards hiring Americans since have of aerospace is military unlike other engineering industries.
If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Flap Track Systems

Wed Oct 18, 2006 11:35 pm

Quoting N231YE (Reply 1):

Fanyastic Pics.When were these clicked.
regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
Avro85
Topic Author
Posts: 236
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2005 4:35 am

RE: Flap Track Systems

Sun Oct 22, 2006 2:44 am

Thanks for all the help guys  Smile
 
zvocio79
Posts: 165
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RE: Flap Track Systems

Mon Nov 06, 2006 12:53 pm

try embry riddle boy.........if you like florida.
buffalo if you like Niagara Falls, may be the Polytechnic Univ in NYC.
 
BoeingOnFinal
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RE: Flap Track Systems

Mon Nov 06, 2006 4:14 pm

RoseFlyer: Interesting read. Now is aerospace engineer something that is available here in Europe as well, to the same extend as the US?

I am becoming a pilot, doing my PPL at the moment, but as years go by, it might be nice to go to something more advanced within the aviation field. Is this particulare field easier to transer to after being a pilot and having been in the industry for years?
What kind of education do you need, and would it be realistic to study for it outside of work, just for the interest of it, and then take the exams when time is right?

Alot of questions here, but it's nice to ask someone that has a fot inside the field  Smile
norwegianpilot.blogspot.com
 
roseflyer
Posts: 9606
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2004 9:34 am

RE: Flap Track Systems

Tue Nov 07, 2006 7:36 am

Quoting BoeingOnFinal (Reply 11):
RoseFlyer: Interesting read. Now is aerospace engineer something that is available here in Europe as well, to the same extend as the US?

Well of course there are many opportunities in Europe. The UK, France and Germany have a lot of aviation. Now nothing is as big as it is in the United States. The US is the world leader in aviation not only because of the many commercial and business aviation companies, but also because the US military is the biggest aviation customer in the world and almost exculsively buys from American companies. Being an American is a big advantage in joining the field, but there are tons of aerospace companies out there. Now while I do work at an aerospace company, the actual work isn't that different from any other form of engineering at any other company. Yes there are posters for the 787, A350, 787, Embraer 170, 737, JSF, F-22 and everything else all over the walls and I throw names around like Boeing, Airbus and Bombardier around all the time, but my actual work is on small things that the average person would have absolutely no idea what they did and that they go into the 787 and similar planes.

There is a big difference in the engineering fields. There is aeronautical engineering, but I'm a mechanical engineer. All sorts of different engineers work in aerospace.

Quoting BoeingOnFinal (Reply 11):
Is this particulare field easier to transer to after being a pilot and having been in the industry for years?

Well companies like knowing that you have an interest in their products. It would make you look a little more special in an interview, but overall, it won't have that much of an influence. Once you are in aerospace though, you will get contacts and that can let you get around more and get you other job offers.

Quoting BoeingOnFinal (Reply 11):
What kind of education do you need, and would it be realistic to study for it outside of work, just for the interest of it, and then take the exams when time is right?

You NEED a college degree. A Bachelor of Science in an engineering field is a good way to get in the field. You won't do anything interesting other than maybe get a union job in manufacturing without education. Overall you want a degree. A masters is useful, but most large companies will pay for you to get a masters.

I'll say that I first got my start in aviation by going up to an aerospace company at a career fair when I was a sophomore year in college. I interviewed and got an internship while in college, which I have continued.
If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!

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