User avatar
BreninTW
Posts: 1532
Joined: Sun Jul 02, 2006 5:31 pm

Why Are These Engines "plugged"?

Fri Dec 22, 2006 9:31 am


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Gregg Stansbery



Looking at this image from the ABX thread, I noticed that the engines on the DC-8 have yellow "plugs" in front of the blades. I've seen this on similar aircraft of similar vintage (QF's 707 comes to mind).

What is the purpose of these plugs? Is it to stop the fans windmilling? What is the procedure for putting them in place?

I've only noticed them on older aircraft, so I'm assuming they're simply impractical for modern high-bypass engines (anyone want to fit one to a 777-300ER engine?)

Thanks
Bren
 
OPNLguy
Posts: 11191
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 1999 11:29 am

RE: Why Are These Engines "plugged"?

Fri Dec 22, 2006 10:16 am

They keep stuff from being blown in the engines during the ground time. You can also seem them when passenger aircraft with rear-mounted engines (MD-80s mostly these days) are catered.
ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
 
fr8mech
Posts: 6585
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 9:00 am

RE: Why Are These Engines "plugged"?

Fri Dec 22, 2006 11:26 am

Different operators have different procedures and criterea for installinf the plugs/covers. We install them when the weather requires it (snow/ice). And yest, there are covers for high bypass engines.
When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
 
User avatar
BreninTW
Posts: 1532
Joined: Sun Jul 02, 2006 5:31 pm

RE: Why Are These Engines "plugged"?

Fri Dec 22, 2006 11:28 am

Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 2):
And yest, there are covers for high bypass engines

Thanks for that. How in heaven's name do you install a cover for a engine for a 777-300ER? Those engines are pretty hefty in size.
 
fr8mech
Posts: 6585
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 9:00 am

RE: Why Are These Engines "plugged"?

Fri Dec 22, 2006 4:05 pm

Don't know about the GE90 class engines, but we have covers for the CF6 & PW4000 engines. They are large plastic tarps (for lack of a better word) that go over the inlet and have a fasteneing system so that they are installed on the engine.

Big, unwieldy and effective.
When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
 
User avatar
HAWK21M
Posts: 29867
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2001 10:05 pm

RE: Why Are These Engines "plugged"?

Fri Dec 22, 2006 5:10 pm

On Low Bypass Engines We use Inlet & Exhaust Plugs
On High Bypass Engines We use a Flexible High strength plastic sheet that can be attached to the Sides.
Its to avoid FOD when Aircraft are parked for prolonged period of time.
regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
57AZ
Posts: 2371
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 2:55 pm

RE: Why Are These Engines "plugged"?

Mon Dec 25, 2006 5:54 pm

Like the others have said, to prevent FOD. One big concern is birds building nests in the cowlings. Many GA piston engined aircraft have similar plugs that fit into the engine cowlings for the same reason.
"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
 
SlamClick
Posts: 9576
Joined: Sun Nov 23, 2003 7:09 am

RE: Why Are These Engines "plugged"?

Tue Dec 26, 2006 12:29 am

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 1):
(MD-80s mostly these days) are catered.

Catering truck pulls up just forward of the MD-80 engine. Engine is at about shoulder level for the caterers on the raised platform of their truck. Caterers unpack meals and supplies in the aft galley generating trash and miscellaneous empty carrying containers.

True or false: The caterers, sooner or later will rest something inside the engine inlet for the moment.

Assuming the above to be true:

True or false: The object left in the engine inlet by the caterers was something they had no further need for and simply needed to get it out of their way, off their hands for a moment.

Assuming the second question it true:

True or false: The caterers will remember to remove the object from the inlet.

Assuming the third question to be false:

True or false: The object left in the engine inlet by the caterers will be visible from the ground during the pilot walkaround or from the flight attendant work areas in the aft galley.

Grade your own work.
Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
 
zanl188
Posts: 3436
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2006 9:05 pm

RE: Why Are These Engines "plugged"?

Tue Dec 26, 2006 1:02 am

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 7):
Catering truck pulls up just forward of the MD-80 engine. Engine is at about shoulder level for the caterers on the raised platform of their truck. Caterers unpack meals and supplies in the aft galley generating trash and miscellaneous empty carrying containers.

True or false: The caterers, sooner or later will rest something inside the engine inlet for the moment.

Assuming the above to be true:

True or false: The object left in the engine inlet by the caterers was something they had no further need for and simply needed to get it out of their way, off their hands for a moment.

Assuming the second question it true:

True or false: The caterers will remember to remove the object from the inlet.

Assuming the third question to be false:

True or false: The object left in the engine inlet by the caterers will be visible from the ground during the pilot walkaround or from the flight attendant work areas in the aft galley.

Grade your own work.

Is it possible to get a catering truck into the rear door of a MD80 ?!?

Back in the day when pax 727s were still prominent, it was common practice for caters handling 727-200s to strap an inlet cover to the trucks work platform safety railing. When the truck was in place (at the rear door) SOP was to put the cover in first, do your business, then remove the cover before pulling out.
Legal considerations provided by: Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe
 
SlamClick
Posts: 9576
Joined: Sun Nov 23, 2003 7:09 am

RE: Why Are These Engines "plugged"?

Tue Dec 26, 2006 2:09 am

Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 8):
Is it possible to get a catering truck into the rear door of a MD80 ?!?

Actually I think not. Truth is, I was thinking about the 727-200. The ten foot plug behind the wing made the gap from wing trailing edge to engine inlet pretty wide.
Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: zanl188 and 19 guests