Spoke2Spoke
Topic Author
Posts: 170
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 10:39 am

Fueling Operations At Large Airfields

Mon Apr 30, 2007 3:09 am

I'm familiar with fueling ops at a small station, but I'm wondering how things are different at a large one. I know many large airports now have fueling systems integrated into the ramp. Fuel flows underground to the gates and equipment at the gate connects to the plane to deliver fuel. What is the technical term for these systems? I can't seem to remember it.

I know PHL doesn't have an integrated system at all terminals. Are there some PHL terminals that do have it?

How common are these systems? What other large airports do not have them?

What is the nature of the equipment to deliver the fuel plane-side? Is it simply a pump, hose and a gauge that draws the fuel up from underground? Who owns and operates this equipment, the airport or a private company?

Finally, have these integrated systems proven beneficial in lowering fueling costs and boosting efficiency?

Thanks everyone for your knowledge.
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ZBBbird
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Joined: Sat Jul 17, 2004 10:04 am

RE: Fueling Operations At Large Airfields

Mon Apr 30, 2007 4:16 am

Well, I will answer as much as I can coming from a mid-size airport. Delivering fuel via underground lines is called hydrant fuelling. The trucks that do this just pump from the hydrant connection to the aircraft so we have a pump and gauges to measure both hydrant pressure and our pump pressure into the airplane. A fuel filter and gauge measuring differential pressure through the filter. A way to sample the fuel to check for water and other contamination. A flow meter in litres per minute and total uplift in litres. And of course a spill kit. At our airport we owned the trucks and were responsible for the hydrant lines (not sure if our company owned them). I am not sure if it helps to lower costs and is more efficient, I just know that I found working a hydrant truck much easier than a tanker, plus no re-loading the truck at the end of the day.
Hope this helps a little,

Sean
 
Tristarsteve
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RE: Fueling Operations At Large Airfields

Mon Apr 30, 2007 6:03 am

Hydrant refuelling with dispensers is nearly essential for a large airport.
First you don't need huge fuel trucks driving around the airport, the dispenser can be on a 3 ton chassis.
These small dispensers do not block the space around the aircraft during a transit.
Most important a small dispenser can fuel a large aircraft by itself. With a fuel tanker you will need two tankers for a B777 and three for a B747. All this takes time.
Tankers are all right for commuters that only need 1000litres, but not a good idea for a B744 that needs 150000litres.
 
Goldenshield
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RE: Fueling Operations At Large Airfields

Mon Apr 30, 2007 6:53 am

Quoting Tristarsteve (Reply 2):
With a fuel tanker you will need two tankers for a B777 and three for a B747.

Or 8 for an AN225.
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Spoke2Spoke
Topic Author
Posts: 170
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 10:39 am

RE: Fueling Operations At Large Airfields

Mon Apr 30, 2007 8:07 am

Thanks for your replies everyone.

Quoting ZBBbird (Reply 1):
Delivering fuel via underground lines is called hydrant fuelling.

Hydrant fueling! That's it. I can see the advantages of this process over a tanker truck army, rolling around and getting in the way of the cargo and baggage operations.

Quoting Tristarsteve (Reply 2):
Tankers are all right for commuters that only need 1000litres, but not a good idea for a B744 that needs 150000litres.

Another good point. Was hydrant fueling around back in early 70's when jumbos were beginning to operate? Or, were initial jumbos fueled with multiple tankers?

A paper on hydrant fueling issues can be found here. It also describes the process, and talks some about the different types of fuels used: http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/PDF...L_HYDrant_system_design_issues.pdf

What large airports have limited or no hydrant fueling systems? I'm still particularly curious about which PHL terminals are served by a hydrant system, and which are served by tankers. I assume at least part of F terminal is tankers, what about A through E?
...carelessness and overconfidence are usually far more dangerous than deliberately accepted risks. - Wilbur Wright
 
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HAWK21M
Posts: 29917
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2001 10:05 pm

RE: Fueling Operations At Large Airfields

Mon Apr 30, 2007 2:26 pm

Quoting Spoke2Spoke (Thread starter):
What is the nature of the equipment to deliver the fuel plane-side? Is it simply a pump, hose and a gauge that draws the fuel up from underground? Who owns and operates this equipment, the airport or a private company?

At BOM on the International Tarmac.We have the Fuel Hydrant system.A small vehicle with a Built in pump is attached to the receptacle on the surface to pump the ATF into the Aircraft.
The Hydrant is interconnected to other hydrants & connects to the Oil company's reservoir by underground Pipings.
The ownership & Quality control checks are specified by the Regulatory Authority that the Oil companies have to adhere too.

regds
MEL
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OGGFBORefueler
Posts: 66
Joined: Wed May 02, 2007 7:27 am

RE: Fueling Operations At Large Airfields

Wed May 02, 2007 8:10 am

Apparently @ OGG there we're pipes layed underground in the early 80's for a hydrant system, but from what I've heard the piping we're too small therefore there are no hydrant fillports on the A/C block in area(s). The company I'm working for operate 11 5,000 gallon refuelers based on Maui alone.

The only setback to our refueling services is that we have to drive outside of the AOA (Airport Ops Area) to a loadrack near Kahului Harbor and then drive back to the AOA. It is very time consuming because at the local loadrack it takes near 20 minutes to load a 5,000 gallon refueler and then do some legal paperwork (Bill of Lading) and the drive back (About 5 to 10 minutes).

[Edited 2007-05-02 01:13:23]
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NBGSkyGod
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Joined: Sun May 30, 2004 7:30 am

RE: Fueling Operations At Large Airfields

Fri May 04, 2007 7:25 am

Quoting Spoke2Spoke (Reply 4):
What large airports have limited or no hydrant fueling systems?

I know BWI still uses truck for most of the airport, although WN is supposed to/or already has them at their gates in Terminal A. Otherwise all fuel is provied by ASIG for the commercial side and SFS on the GA side via trucks of varying size.
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