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BA-609 Or V-22 Engine Failure

Tue Jun 26, 2007 4:37 pm

Hi fellows,

Following the recent BA-609 exhibitions both in Pratica di Mare (Rome) and Le Bourget Airshows, I have a question for you: what does it happen to that tilt rotors in case of engine failure? Is it a single engine able to give its power to both rotors in case you have lost the other one?

I hope so...

Thanks for you replies!
 
xv408
Posts: 52
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2006 1:24 am

RE: BA-609 Or V-22 Engine Failure

Tue Jun 26, 2007 5:17 pm

Not sure on the margins, but there is a cross-linking shaft to ensure both rotors are driven in the case of engine failure.
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: BA-609 Or V-22 Engine Failure

Tue Jun 26, 2007 9:26 pm

As Xv408 mentions, each engines can power both rotors through shafts running in the wing. Basic common sense I guess. This system has been in use on double rotor helicopters for decades.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
bhmbaglock
Posts: 2489
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RE: BA-609 Or V-22 Engine Failure

Sun Jul 01, 2007 8:19 am

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 2):
This system has been in use on double rotor helicopters for decades.

It's a bit different on a CH-46/7 in that the shaft always carries half the power(on average); this is its primary role. In a tilt-rotor, the primary role of the interconnecting shaft is to synchronize the two rotors. In the case of an engine failure it is capable of transferring power between nacelles for the duration of the emergency but is not designed to take the associated loads continuously.
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Starlionblue
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RE: BA-609 Or V-22 Engine Failure

Sun Jul 01, 2007 12:04 pm

Quoting BHMBAGLOCK (Reply 3):
It's a bit different on a CH-46/7 in that the shaft always carries half the power(on average); this is its primary role. In a tilt-rotor, the primary role of the interconnecting shaft is to synchronize the two rotors. In the case of an engine failure it is capable of transferring power between nacelles for the duration of the emergency but is not designed to take the associated loads continuously.

Good info thx. Do you know how the Mi-12 operated? 4 engines in nacelles under 2 rotors with cross-connect.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
KELPkid
Posts: 5247
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:33 am

RE: BA-609 Or V-22 Engine Failure

Sun Jul 01, 2007 3:22 pm

Quoting BHMBAGLOCK (Reply 3):
It's a bit different on a CH-46/7 in that the shaft always carries half the power(on average); this is its primary role. In a tilt-rotor, the primary role of the interconnecting shaft is to synchronize the two rotors. In the case of an engine failure it is capable of transferring power between nacelles for the duration of the emergency but is not designed to take the associated loads continuously.

Doesn't the shaft also serve the same purpose in the CH-46 and CH-47? I thought that the rotor arcs between the front and rear rotors actually crossed, and that this was possible because the rotor blades were synchronized...of course, I may be mixing up the Boeing Vertol/Piasecki system with the Kaman rotor system  Wink
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