dl767captain
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What's A Domocile?

Wed Aug 08, 2007 4:18 am

What is a domocile? And where do pilots stay when they can't get home for their last flight, and how does it work?
 
kaitak
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Joined: Wed Aug 18, 1999 5:49 am

RE: What's A Domocile?

Wed Aug 08, 2007 4:24 am

Domicile, as I understand it, is a term relating to one's tax position. One can be resident in a particular country, but not necessarily domiciled there for tax purposes; it would be very relevant to airline pilots (although, I suspect, not necessarily to US pilots because the IRS takes the view that US nationals are taxable on their worldwide assets, not just assets and money earned within the US).

For example, an Irish pilot might be based in (say) Dubai, but he could still be domiciled in Ireland, for tax purposes (or more importantly, deemed domiciled - he may not think he is, but the Revenue Commissioners - the Irish IRS - do!).

It is a very complicated issue and varies widely from country to country; we could go through 3000 posts and not get to the bottom of it, but that's why tax consultants earn about $600+ an hour!

As far as not getting home for their last flight, assuming they're not working for FR or a European low cost carrier (which won't pay for them), most airlines will probably put them up for the night; in a situation like that, the pilot would call his/her operations control centre and they would make arrangements (a) for accommodation (if the circumstances warrant it) and (b) to get an alternative crew for the flight.
 
Alias1024
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RE: What's A Domocile?

Wed Aug 08, 2007 4:49 am

Quoting DL767captain (Thread starter):
What is a domocile? And where do pilots stay when they can't get home for their last flight, and how does it work?

In the airline business, domicile is the city in which a pilot or flight attendant is based. As far as getting home, if the crew is scheduled to to spend the night away from their domicile as part of a trip, then the airline buys hotel rooms for all the crew members. If something happens on that trip that strands them away from their domicile when the trip is supposed to be over, then the airline pays for hotel rooms for the crew. If the trip has been completed at the domicile, and the pilot or F/A simply can't non-rev from their domicile to their home, then they are on their own for accommodations. Options include crashpads, hotels, and sleeping in the crew room.



Quoting Kaitak (Reply 1):
One can be resident in a particular country, but not necessarily domiciled there for tax purposes; it would be very relevant to airline pilots (although, I suspect, not necessarily to US pilots because the IRS takes the view that US nationals are taxable on their worldwide assets, not just assets and money earned within the US).

It is still of issue for US pilots. Many pilots are domiciled in states with a state income tax, but have their residence in states such as Florida, Texas, and Washington, which do not have state income tax. Even though they are employed in a state with income tax, pilots and flight attendants are usually exempt from that state's income tax if they live in a state without income tax. That's why probably 75% of the pilots in my domicile don't live in the same state as the domicile.

edit for spelling

[Edited 2007-08-07 21:50:16]
It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
 
SlamClick
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RE: What's A Domocile?

Wed Aug 08, 2007 5:27 am

Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 2):
Many pilots are domiciled in states with a state income tax, but have their residence in states such as Florida, Texas, and Washington, which do not have state income tax. Even though they are employed in a state with income tax, pilots and flight attendants are usually exempt from that state's income tax if they live in a state without income tax.

I live, vote, pay other taxes, serve jury duty and otherwise discharge my civic obligatons in a state (Nevada) which does not have a state income tax. For a time I was domiciled in SFO and later in LAX. I had to supply logbook extracts to the State of California, Fascist Tax Board ('scuse me I mean Franchise Tax Board) every year. If 50% of my flying or more was over the State of California then all of my income was taxable in California. Furthermore, California had a law that if you file jointly on your Federal taxes you must file jointly in California. This meant that my wife's income was taxable in California even though she never set foot in the state. God damn those fascist bastards. (sorry! I won't rant again)

So I had to calculate, say, for a flight PHX-LAX at what point I crossed the state line. Every tenth (we didn't use minutes) from there to block-in time was time over california. Same thing leaving: SFO-SEA, how many tenths until we cross the Oregon border.

I believe fully in discharging one's civic obligations. I favor a national draft, in fact. But I had been taught that "taxation without representation is tyranny" and I have a sacred obigation to withold any support to tyrants. I vow that some day I will cost the state of California ten times what they cost me. I don't know how I'll do it but it will be legal.

It used to be worse. Many states had laws that said that if 2% or more of your flying was over their land you had a tax debt to that state. Think of that - if all 50 states had the 2% rule then you could conceivably have a Federal tax debt and FIFTY different state tax debts. Your tax debt each year would be several times your gross earnings.

My eternal gratitude to those who encountered this tyranny before I did and ended it in our courts. Likewise to Senator Harry Reid for ending the "source" tax which would have made my retirement income taxable in California even if I moved to Somalia.
Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
 
Alias1024
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RE: What's A Domocile?

Wed Aug 08, 2007 5:55 am

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 3):
I vow that some day I will cost the state of California ten times what they cost me. I don't know how I'll do it but it will be legal.

 rotfl 
I knew California still had ways to tax crews who didn't live in their state, but I didn't know it was so convoluted. Calculating flight time over their state and forcing people to file in California even if they never set foot there is beyond wrong. I wish you well in your endeavors against the California Republic.
It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
 
futureualpilot
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RE: What's A Domocile?

Wed Aug 08, 2007 7:41 am

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 3):
I vow that some day I will cost the state of California ten times what they cost me. I don't know how I'll do it but it will be legal.

Lottery perhaps? Best of luck! If you think of a better way, please let me know, I am aiming to be an airline pilot and would like to have that sort of tool in my bag of tricks...
Life is better when you surf.
 
SlamClick
Posts: 9576
Joined: Sun Nov 23, 2003 7:09 am

RE: What's A Domocile?

Wed Aug 08, 2007 7:46 am

Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 4):
Calculating flight time over their state

It is worse for the airlines. They have to pay property tax on their airplanes for every minute they are in or over the state, based on the value of the airframe.

I suppose they also tax ships in California ports.
Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
 
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Starlionblue
Posts: 17114
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2004 9:54 pm

RE: What's A Domocile?

Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:56 am

Quoting SlamClick (Reply 3):
I believe fully in discharging one's civic obligations. I favor a national draft, in fact. But I had been taught that "taxation without representation is tyranny" and I have a sacred obigation to withold any support to tyrants. I vow that some day I will cost the state of California ten times what they cost me. I don't know how I'll do it but it will be legal.

Hehe. I'll be cheering you on.

There's nothing like regulators regulating that which they don't understand. Ask any immigrant. Why are laws designed to punish illegal immigrants hampering my legal entry? I pay (lots of) taxes and otherwise discharge my civic duties. But there's always something. Maybe those good senators and representatives should try entering the country on a legal green card some day...



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