bbinn333
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How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 8:14 pm

I have always wondered how the airlines come up with their flight numbers ?

My Guesses :

Just Choose Them Randomly

Or Check If Other Flights have the same Or Similar Flight Numbers Arriving Or departing the same airport so ATC does not get confused ?

All guesses and answers are welcome !
Go MCO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! VS, WN, DL, F9, CO, AA, US, VS, AC, AS, BA,
 
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aloha73g
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 8:40 pm

ATC has something to do with it.

For instance, HA and AQ used different set of numbers for interisland flights.

0-110 was primarily AQ
111-199 was primarily HA
200-299 was only AQ
300-599 was only HA (HA uses NO numbers in the 400s for interisland)

go! and Island Air primarily use 4 digit flight numbers

Since AQ stopped flying HA has added flight numbers in the 200s.

I always assumed they did it to prevent ATC confusion.

-Aloha!
Aloha Airlines - The Spirit Moves Us. Gone but NEVER Forgotten. Aloha, A Hui Hou!
 
glbltrvlr
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 8:42 pm

I suspect the answer is - it depends. I know some specific (usually low) numbers are chosen as a device to indicate that a particular route is a "flagship route". Some numbers are chosen for cultural significance (like UA 888). And then laid on top of that are series designations, where numbers in a certain range are chosen to indicate a certain type of route or equipment. Then you get all the regional, codeshare, maintenance, gauge change, replacement flight and repositioning numbers.
 
ANITIX87
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 8:43 pm

It depends on several things. I list several examples below, and please correct me if I'm wrong.

Most airlines have their lowest numbers for their international routes, and the higher ones for domestic flights. DL, LX, SQ, and CO do this (although CO has some exceptions, like CO1 is IAH-HNL, I believe).

Other airlines do the opposite. I believe UA and LH does this (their international flights are in the 400s and 900s, respectively.)

Yet another group of airlines do numbers based on the flight's origin. Flights leaving the major hub get low numbers. I can't think of an accurate example off the top of my head, but I believe QF does this to an extent.

Which number is which for a given route depends also. Usually, the outbound flight (away from the hub) is the higher, odd number (LX's GVA-JFK is LX22, and CO's EWR-GVA is CO80) and the inbound flight is the lower, even number (JFK-GVA is LX23 and GVA-EWR is CO81).

As for other airlines having the same flight number, I don't know if this is an issue, since the callsigns are different. I was curious as to how many airlines have their flight 1 into or out of LHR and there were many, many airlines (DL, BA, BMI, QF, to name a few).

Hope that helps!

TIS
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petteri
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 8:51 pm

Sometimes it's just for fun. Frontier has lucky 777 from Denver to Las Vegas.
The above comments are my personal comments and in no way should be viewed as the views,policy or statements of JetBlue
 
misbeehavin
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 8:55 pm

Some logic is often applied. Like BA:

<200 = long haul
300 = france, belgium
400 = spain, gibraltar, netherlands
500 = portugal, italy
600 = greece, turkey, cyprus, serbia, albania
700 = norway, sweden, finland, switzerland, austria
800 = denmark, hungary, czechia, libya, algeria, romania, serbia, russia, bulgaria, ukraine, poland, bosnia
900 = germany

LH has something like:
<100 = domestic - hamburg
100 = domestic - berlin
200 = domestic - berlin
300 = domestic - bremen
400 = north america
500 = africa, south america
600 = middle east, central asia
700 = asia, india
800 = domestic - dusseldorf
900 = domestic - munich
and so on
 
SInGAPORE_AIR
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 8:57 pm

This is how Singapore Airlines seems to organise their flight numbers.
Anyone can fly, only the best Soar.
 
luv2cattlecall
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 9:05 pm

In many cases, (I think SX was a big exception) it's "Even East, Uneven UUest"
.
 
MakeMinesLAX
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 9:17 pm

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 2):
Most airlines have their lowest numbers for their international routes, and the higher ones for domestic flights. DL, LX, SQ, and CO do this (although CO has some exceptions, like CO1 is IAH-HNL, I believe).

Flight 1 (sometimes 001) is typically a prominent flagship route. Pan Am's round-the-world service comes to mind.

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 2):
Which number is which for a given route depends also. Usually, the outbound flight (away from the hub) is the higher, odd number (LX's GVA-JFK is LX22, and CO's EWR-GVA is CO80) and the inbound flight is the lower, even number (JFK-GVA is LX23 and GVA-EWR is CO81).

In general US (i.e. USA, not US Airways) usage, even numbered flights are W-E/S-N and odds are in the opposite directions. Prominent services with high frequency are often bunched. Offhand, I can think of UA's LAX-SFO (500s) and LAX/SFO-ORD (100s) which have been around forever.

Two examples with numerical significance which have stuck in my mind are UA's flight 711 (ORD-LAS) and US's once-upon-a-time flight 1492 (LAX-CMH). Chinese arlines also like liberally sprinkling 8s around, like CX's flight 888 (HKG-JFK). Speaking of which, today (08/08/08) is the luckiest day of all for the Chinese (specifically Cantonese).

Quoting Aloha73G (Reply 1):
ATC has something to do with it.

I recently flew LAX-IAD on UA flight 946, which continues IAD-AMS on a different aircraft. My flight was delayed about four hours, and the cockpit used the callsign "United 946 tango heavy" (how I love channel 9!). I asked one of the flight crew about the special designation, and he explained it was to distinguish ours from another similarly named flight in the same airspace (i.e. United 946 IAD-AMS, which was not going to hold for our arrival).

[Edited 2008-08-08 14:25:04]
 
UPS757Pilot
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 9:21 pm

UPS by zip code domestically. (ie 917 is ONT-SDF, 919 is another ONT-SDF) Second day air flight with a flight number beginning with 2 (ie 2956). Additional flights with a 3 or 4 (ie 4195). Repositions with an 8. Contingency (hot spares) with a 9. International is different in the interest of easier to read/understand flight numbers.
 
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CV880
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 9:51 pm



Quoting Aloha73G (Reply 1):
ATC has something to do with it.

??

Delta(Mainline) generally denotes east/northbound flights by even numbers and west/southbound by odd numbers in the US. The flight numbers used to identify the type of aircraft as well, but not the case present day. 2 digit numbers denoted 747's in their day. 800's were DC-8, 900's were 880's, and 10-1100 series were L10's, and the boring planes were in the middle. Each airline has it's own system, and DL's has changed many times over the years. IIRC, the odd-even bit has remained the only constant thru the years, but have seen exceptions to that(like Regional Carrier #s).
 
vv701
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 08, 2008 10:58 pm



Quoting Misbeehavin (Reply 5):
Some logic is often applied. Like BA:

<200 = long haul
300 = france, belgium
400 = spain, gibraltar, netherlands
500 = portugal, italy
600 = greece, turkey, cyprus, serbia, albania
700 = norway, sweden, finland, switzerland, austria
800 = denmark, hungary, czechia, libya, algeria, romania, serbia, russia, bulgaria, ukraine, poland, bosnia
900 = germany

This is broadly correct for flights to and from LHR except that long haul flights are <300 (with, for example BA206 being MIA-LHR AND BA214 BOS-LHR .

Additionally:

1000 to 1500 = domestic flights ex LHR
2000 to 3000 and 7900-8100 = flights ex LGW
4300 to 4400 = code share flights on LA metal
4700 to 4900 = code share flights on BE metal
5000 to 5500(?) = code share flights on AA metal
6000 to 6100 = code share flights on AY metal
6200 to 6500 = franchise flights operated by Comair (South Africa)
7000 to 7300 = code share flights on IB metal
7300 to 7500 = code share flights on QF metal
7500 to 7600 = code share on BD metal
8200 to 8300 = franchise flights operated by Sun Air of Scandinavia
8400 and 8700 = BA CityFlyer flights ex LCY
8840 to 9000 franchise flights operated by Loganair

Outward bound long haul flights have uneven numbers, inward bound long haul flights even numbers. The outward bound flight is usually one above the inward bound flight operated by the same aircraft. So, for example, the daily outward bound LHR-JFK 772 flight is BA173 and the return JFK-LHR 772 flight is BA172.

Outward bound short haul flights have even numbers and the return flights odd numbers. So the first LHR-CDG flight of the day is BA304 and that aircraft returns to LHR as BA307.

Flight numbers are assigned as Misbeehavin has indicated and wherever possible the numbers for a single destination are grouped together. So flights between LHR and CDG are in the range BA302 to BA329, while those between LHR and LYS (Lyons) and between LHR and NCE are in the ranges BA360 to BA365 and BA342 to BA352 respectively.
 
AA737-823
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 10:34 am

I also note that you can see patterns depending on destination sometimes.
For example, Continental has 167, 267, 367, 437, 667, and 1767 doing IAH-SEA.
From Newark, they've got 281, 1481, 1581, 1681, 1881 doing EWR-SEA.

So there's definitely some patterns there.
 
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PM
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 11:00 am

I have an imaginary airline. (Don't we all?) It's based in Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) and the flights numbers work like this:

100-199 : domestic
200-299 : Africa to the south
300-399 : Africa to the west
400-499 : Africa to the north
500-599 : The Americas
600-699 : Europe and Middle East
700-799 : Asia and Australia

Some random examples:

152 DAR-DOD 1234567 SB2
DOD-BKZ 1234567 SB2
153 BKZ-DOD 1234567 SB2
DOD- DAR 1234567 SB2
222 DAR-HRE 1234567 A319
223 HRE-DAR 1234567 A319
332 DAR-LOS 1234567 A319
333 LOS-DAR 1234567 A319
415 MBA-DAR 1234567 B717
418 DAR-MBA 1234567 B717
500 DAR-JFK 1234567 A345
501 JFK-DAR 1234567 A345
600 DAR-LHR 1234567 A332
601 LHR-DAR 1234567 A332
770 DAR-SYD ..3...7 A345
771 SYD-DAR 1..4... A345

Dar es Salaam direct to JFK and SYD? Oh yes. Look out SAA!  Wink

(I know... "Get a life..."  Sad)
 
Speedbird2155
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 11:03 am



Quoting VV701 (Reply 11):
1000 to 1500 = domestic flights ex LHR

Correct, but there are a few exceptions. Some longhaul flights also carry flight numbers within this range eg BA1293, BA1039 etc. These operate on some days when there is a significant difference in departure time ex LHR on different days. So if on one day the flight leaves at say 1745 and another it goes at 1230, you tend to then see the 1 being added to differentiate.

Quoting VV701 (Reply 11):
Outward bound short haul flights have even numbers and the return flights odd numbers. So the first LHR-CDG flight of the day is BA304 and that aircraft returns to LHR as BA307.

The first CDG is usually the BA302.
 
smi0006
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 11:08 am

I know that with QF;

Flight QF1 to 399 are international flights and flights QF 400 and above are domestic.
I also beleive that around 1300 and above they become QFlink flights or codeshares (not sure if that is the exact number though). Also flights outbound from Australia are the lower designator with the return secot the higher ie. QF93 from Mel to LA and QF94 LA to Mel!
 
bond007
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 12:36 pm

This has been discussed to death many times.

There are at least FIVE links to previous threads in the 'similar topics' list below this thread.

The answer ... the airline chooses. They can use whatever numbers they want, for whatever routes. Many airlines have some logic in the numbering, but there are no 'rules' across airlines, apart from the fact there can't be 2 flights with the same number in the system at the same time (hence why a letter is added at the end sometimes) ... but I'm sure all the other threads address that.




Jimbo
I'd rather be on the ground wishing I was in the air, than in the air wishing I was on the ground!
 
vv701
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 2:17 pm



Quoting Speedbird2155 (Reply 14):
Some longhaul flights also carry flight numbers within this range eg BA1293, BA1039 etc. These operate on some days when there is a significant difference in departure time ex LHR on different days.

BA seem to be quite relaxed about giving the same flight numbers to flights on a single route that depart at different times on different days of the week. So, for example BA119 (LHR-BGR) departs LHR at 1350 hrs on Wednesdays, 1410 hrs on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays and at 1415 hrs on Fridays. (I believe these variations in timings are forced on BA by LHR slot availability.)

However BA do need to differentiate flight numbers on flights departing at the same time but using different aircraft types on different days of the week because of seat allocation. And where there is no adjacent or nearby flight number they have taken to adding a "1'" in front of the flight number provided the number thus created is not or has not been in recent use for a domestic flight.

There is currently but one example of the above:

BA053 is a 772 flight operating LHR-SEA on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. It departs LHR at 1735 on Mondays and at 1820 on the 3 other days it operates.

BA1053 is a 744 flight operating LHR-SEA on Wednesday and Sunday. It departs at 1255 hrs on Wednesday and 1355 on Sunday.

As can be seen the "1" is not added when the time changes but it is added when the equipment changes.

What is confusing is the case of the only other BA flight which has had a "1" added in front of it. This is the daily BA 744 LHR-PEK flight. Originally this was a 772 flight, BA039. I believe it was upgraded to a 744 flight on selected days of the week and then at a later date to a 744 flight on every day of the week. With the first upgrade on Tuesday and Thursday the flight number was, I believe, changed to BA1039. But when BA started to operate their former 772 flights on the other days of the week with a 744 they continued to use both flight numbers (BA039 and BA1039) probably because the Tuesday and Thursday departures are at 1250 hrs and the departures on all other days are at 1640 hrs.

These LHR-SEA and LHR-PEK flights are the only examples where a "1" has been added to the front of an existing three digit BA flight number. However there are numerous other examples of both short haul and long haul flights operating out of LHR, LGW and, for short haull flights only, LCY where flights with different departure times on different days have the same flight number.
 
acNDTTech
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 2:45 pm

I remember back in the day, when DL L-1011 flts. were either 10xx or 11xx, I think DC-9's were 14xx or 17xx, can't remember the DC-8's but they were common too, and the 727's were all the rest.
 
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bwest
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 3:05 pm

It always pleases me to see that CX001 is from HKG to BRU... though it's cargo only  Sad
I love my Airport Job! :)
 
avconsultant
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 3:40 pm

United States carriers assign the numbers by when the states were added to the Union.  Wink
 
Yankees
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 4:05 pm

Unless Someone Can Correct Me I think all American Airlines flights to South American except day flights [Brasil] have a flight number in the 900 range.
B733,B738,B752,B762,B763,B777,MD80,CRJ,CR7,ATR,ER3,ERD,ER4,A319,A320,A321
 
Speedbird2155
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 6:33 pm

Quoting VV701 (Reply 17):
These LHR-SEA and LHR-PEK flights are the only examples where a "1" has been added to the front of an existing three digit BA flight number. However there are numerous other examples of both short haul and long haul flights operating out of LHR, LGW and, for short haull flights only, LCY where flights with different departure times on different days have the same flight number.

The LHR-IAD BA293/1293 is another example (have had this recently). While it does appear to now be based more on equipment type, when these differentiated flight numbers started being used, it was down more to departure times, when there was a few hours difference on different days. IIRC, the LHR-YYC service also operated with teh 1 added on some days for a bit.....but the equipment never changed.

Just a quick check of the schedules shows:

BA1053 - 1255 or 1355 STD (depending on day)
BA053 - 1735 or 1820 STD (depending on day)
BA1039 - 1250 STD
BA039 - 1640 STD

So it does still change depending on STD some of the time.

[Edited 2008-08-09 11:43:16]
 
deltairlines
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 6:59 pm

US Airways Flights 1-699 are the ones operated by the former America West birds while the 700+ numbers are the former East birds - the merger hasn't been totally finished off yet (pilots...) so it's a way to differentiate between the two since West pilots don't fly East planes and vise-versa.
 
vv701
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 09, 2008 9:26 pm



Quoting Speedbird2155 (Reply 22):
The LHR-IAD BA293/1293 is another example (have had this recently).

Many thanks for drawing my attention to this flight that I had overlooked.

BA293/1293 departs from LHR every day of the week at 1710 hours even though BA use the two related but different flight numbers. On Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday this flight is flown using a 744 and the flight is numbered BA293. On Monday and Sunday BA use different equipment (772) but, although departure time is still 1710 hours, the flight is renumbered BA1293.

This confirms what I said before, namely that BA add the "1" when there is a change of equipment and not when there is a different departure time.
 
Mir
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sun Aug 10, 2008 1:54 am



Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 2):
Other airlines do the opposite. I believe UA and LH does this (their international flights are in the 400s and 900s, respectively.)

Other way around. LH's intercontinental flights (at least to the US) are in the 400 range and UA's intercontinental flights are in the 800 (Asia) and 900 (Europe) range.

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 2):
As for other airlines having the same flight number, I don't know if this is an issue, since the callsigns are different.

It is a very big issue. It used to be the case that Aer Lingus and Air India both had flight #111 scheduled to arrive at about the same time at JFK. Often, one of them would fly down final behind the other. Despite "Shamrock" and "Air India" sounding nothing alike, the similar flight number was of great concern to the JFK controllers, and now while Aer Lingus still has the flight number 111, they use the callsign "Shamrock 11C" while Air India has stuck with "Air India 111".

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
CanadianNorth
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sun Aug 10, 2008 8:50 pm

Air North has a simple enough system to follow. How it came to be though I don't know.

70s = Ground equipment call signs (atleast at YXY)

100s = Often used for jet charters

205/206 = part of the Summer North sched
305/306 = normal North sched

505/506 = Vancouver sched
507/508 = Alberta sched

525/526 = Vancouver extras
527/528 = Alberta extras

600s = Usually Hawker charters etc



CanadianNorth
What could possibly go wrong?
 
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Zkpilot
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Mon Aug 11, 2008 12:53 pm

A lot of airlines to Asia (China, HKG in particular) like to assign flight numbers with 8's in them... a cultural thing.

Other things a lot of airlines assign even or odd numbers depending on whether a flight is leaving a big hub or arriving (depends on the airline... ie QF assigns odd numbers leaving and evens returning, NZ on the other hand does the opposite).
56 types. 38 countries. 24 airlines.
 
Viscount724
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Wed Aug 13, 2008 9:46 pm



Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 2):
Which number is which for a given route depends also. Usually, the outbound flight (away from the hub) is the higher, odd number (LX's GVA-JFK is LX22, and CO's EWR-GVA is CO80) and the inbound flight is the lower, even number (JFK-GVA is LX23 and GVA-EWR is CO81).

CO's flight numbers in the examples you mention have nothing to do with being from and to their hub. LH (and LX) are fairly unusual in doing that. The majority of other airlines have long applied the general rule that eastbound flights use even numbers and westbound flights use odd numbers. That's why it's CO80 eastbound and CO81 westbound. There are some isolated exceptions, for example when DL started JFK-LGW service a year or so ago (since moved from LGW to LHR), they used DL1 for the eastbound flight and DL2 westbound. Those flights (and DL3 and DL4 on the same route) may be DL's only longhaul eastbound/westbound flights that don't use the traditional eastbound even/westbound odd system.

If you look at all transatlantic airlines you will probably find that LH and LX are almost the only ones using even numbers westbound and odd numbers eastbound, due to their historic practice of using even numbers FROM their hubs, and odd numbers TO their hubs, regardless of direction of travel.
 
KELPkid
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Wed Aug 13, 2008 10:14 pm



Quoting PM (Reply 13):
(I know... "Get a life..." )

Let me guess: your fleet has all Rolls-Royce Power?  Wink
Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
 
COSPN
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Sat Aug 16, 2008 9:16 am

CO Has 500 to IND 1492 to CMH and probally a few others to make travel Interesting
 
johnclipper
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Wed Aug 27, 2008 4:28 am



Quoting Yankees (Reply 21):
Unless Someone Can Correct Me I think all American Airlines flights to South American except day flights [Brasil] have a flight number in the 900 range.

AA's flight numbers to South America are a holdover from EA. Just like UA's flight numbers to Asia are a holdover from PA.

PA
1-199 - Europe
200-299 - Caribbean/Latin America/South America
400-499 - Latin America/South America
800-899 - Far East and Australia/NZ
"Flown every aircraft since the Wright Flyer" (guys, if you take this literally, then you need to get a life...)
 
optionscle
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Wed Aug 27, 2008 4:25 pm



Quoting COSPN (Reply 30):
CO Has 500 to IND 1492 to CMH and probally a few others to make travel Interesting

That's right. Also 1776 IAH-PHL.

One of NW's MSP-CMH flights is also 1492.
 
Tristarsteve
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Wed Aug 27, 2008 5:22 pm

When I started with BA in ARN the flight numbers were 649 to 659.
649 was added when BA introduced an early morning dep from ARN in 1987.
Then they changed them to 771-786.
Ask any foreigner living in Sweden and 7 is very difficult to pronounce, especially the
lunchtime flight out of ARN which is the BA777.
I am sure some joker did it on purpose just to show up my lousy Swedish!
 
Viscount724
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Wed Aug 27, 2008 9:55 pm



Quoting JohnClipper (Reply 31):
PA
1-199 - Europe
200-299 - Caribbean/Latin America/South America
400-499 - Latin America/South America
800-899 - Far East and Australia/NZ

And if memory correct 600-699 were the flights within Germany to/from Berlin.
 
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UltimateDelta
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Thu Aug 28, 2008 1:04 am



Quoting Bbinn333 (Thread starter):
Or Similar Flight Numbers Arriving Or departing the same airport so ATC does not get confused ?

I don't know much about this, but apparently one airline flying into London had a flight numbered 1011 and another had one numbered 1101. These flights landed within several minutes of each other, and one day there was some confusion resulting in an incident of some sort. A few days later one of the numbers was changed.
Midwest Airlines- 1984-2010
 
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vhqpa
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Thu Aug 28, 2008 5:29 am

Ill expand on QF

International flights on QF metal are numbered 1-199 outbound sectors from Australia are odd numbered (ie. QF9 MEL-SIN-LHR) inbound sectors are even numbered (ie. QF12 LAX-SYD).

Flight numbers 200-299 are rarely used but I believe may be used for seasonal International flights IIRC SYD-ZQN was in the 200 series when it first started.

Flight numbers 300-399 are International flights which either originate or terminate in Australia. with odds used outbound and evens inbound.

Flight numbers 400-499 are domestics primarily between SYD-MEL although some of the higher numbers are MEL-PER sectors. All domestic flights are even northbound/eastbound and odd southbound/westbound

Flight numbers 500- around the 560 mark are exclusively SYD-BNE sectors. 560-599 are typically transcons.

Flight numbers 600- around the 640 mark are exclusively MEL-BNE sectors.

Flight numbers 640-1099 are any other scheduled mainline domestic flight.

Flight numbers 1100-1399 are rarely used I believe 1300 series flights are resource charters I have seen BNE-GOV flights a few times with a 1300 series flight number.

Flight numbers 1400-1499 are Qantaslink Dash 8 flights on SYD-CBR sectors.

Flight numbers 1800-1999 are Qantaslink/NJS 717 flights

Flight numbers 2000-2299 are Qantaslink/Eastern Dash 8 flights

Flight numbers 2300-2599 are Qantaslink/Sunstate Dash 8 flights although some 2500 series flights are Alliance F100 optd. between BNE-MKY

Flight numbers 2600-2699 are Qantaslink service operated by either Alliance F50/F100 or Air North E70 in SA/WA

Flight numbers 2700-2799 are Domestic NZ jetconnect flights

Flight numbers 3000-3999 are International codeshare on flight which do not originate or terminate in Australia

Flight numbers 5000-5999 are Codeshare domestic flights operated by JQ.

Flight numbers 6000-6999 are repositioning flights

Flight numbers 7000-7999 are freight flights




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LASoctoberB6
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Fri Aug 29, 2008 12:46 am



Quoting Petteri (Reply 4):
Frontier has lucky 777 from Denver to Las Vegas.

I hear it all time! It always, for some reason, gets me to think that there is a 777 inbound..


From Las Vegas, jetBlue flight numbers that begin with a 1 go to JFK, 2 go to LGB, 3 go to IAD, and 4 go to Boston..
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Mon Sep 01, 2008 12:29 am

To me, Delta's seem pretty random (except for international flights) because I have been on the 6 AM flight from MCI to ATL four times and there have been four different flight numbers: 1237, 1216, 1114, and 1670.
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mirrodie
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RE: How Airlines Choose Their Flight Numbers

Mon Sep 01, 2008 3:38 am



Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 12):
So there's definitely some patterns there.

Unlike AAs 1, 19, 201, 3,117, 133, 181, 21, and 185, all of which are JFK-LAX.

Quoting Bond007 (Reply 16):
he answer ... the airline chooses. They can use whatever numbers they want, for whatever routes. Many airlines have some logic in the numbering, but there are no 'rules' across airlines,

So at the end of the day, yes, its random in that some airlines use a system while others do not.
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