jetblueguy22
Posts: 2509
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 12:26 am

Determining An Aircraft's Schedule

Thu Jul 09, 2009 2:31 pm

Who determines which routes aircraft go on. I don't mean type wise I mean registration wise. Like who determines that N336NB will fly BDL-MSP?
Blue
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oly720man
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Joined: Fri May 21, 2004 7:13 am

RE: Determining An Aircraft's Schedule

Thu Jul 09, 2009 3:13 pm

Looking at this PDF

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&sou...zHjzNg&sig2=7b6CJ7yYlFJiLl4MCpSvqA

e.g. at KLM, an Operations Department optimises the utilisation of every aircraft after the Network Department has drawn up the schedules. This is probably with the help of a fairly smart computer system that interacts with other aspects of the aircraft requirements as well as the day to day operation.
wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
 
Flighty
Posts: 7651
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 3:07 am

RE: Determining An Aircraft's Schedule

Thu Jul 09, 2009 7:00 pm

Well of course JetBlue does not fly BDL-MSP except by charter.

In normal scheduled routes, the fleet cycles through the whole network. So "BDL-MSP" will be aircraft #1 today, #2 tomorrow, #3 the next day until you run out of aircraft and the whole thing repeats. In that way, the fleet schedule is a big loop that takes a long time to complete. At JetBlue, if they have 50 E-190s, it will take 50 days for the loop to complete.

This keeps the hours even between the jets. It also allows maintenance checks every few days. A fleet that is in sync with itself is easier to maintain and operate.
 
jetblueguy22
Posts: 2509
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 12:26 am

RE: Determining An Aircraft's Schedule

Thu Jul 09, 2009 7:17 pm



Quoting Flighty (Reply 2):

In normal scheduled routes, the fleet cycles through the whole network. So "BDL-MSP" will be aircraft #1 today, #2 tomorrow, #3 the next day until you run out of aircraft and the whole thing repeats. In that way, the fleet schedule is a big loop that takes a long time to complete. At JetBlue, if they have 50 E-190s, it will take 50 days for the loop to complete.

This keeps the hours even between the jets. It also allows maintenance checks every few days. A fleet that is in sync with itself is easier to maintain and operate.

Oh I see. That makes a lot of sense.

Quoting Flighty (Reply 2):
Well of course JetBlue does not fly BDL-MSP except by charter.

N336NB is a NW jet anyways.
Blue
All of the opinions stated above are mine and do not represent Airliners.net or my employer unless otherwise stated.
 
Dalmd88
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Joined: Fri Jul 28, 2000 3:19 am

RE: Determining An Aircraft's Schedule

Fri Jul 10, 2009 5:26 am



Quoting Flighty (Reply 2):
In normal scheduled routes, the fleet cycles through the whole network. So "BDL-MSP" will be aircraft #1 today, #2 tomorrow, #3 the next day until you run out of aircraft and the whole thing repeats. In that way, the fleet schedule is a big loop that takes a long time to complete. At JetBlue, if they have 50 E-190s, it will take 50 days for the loop to complete.

This keeps the hours even between the jets. It also allows maintenance checks every few days. A fleet that is in sync with itself is easier to maintain and operate.

Maybe with small fleets it works that way. I'm pretty intune with patterns, actually I'm kind of obsessed with figuring them out. With DL your pattern falls apart real quick. I've seen the same plane fly a non shuttle route for six days with an overnight at our mtc base every night. For most of those nights there was nothing due but the manditory Layover Check. I really thing the routing is dictated by PFM.
 
Flighty
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Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 3:07 am

RE: Determining An Aircraft's Schedule

Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:31 am



Quoting DALMD88 (Reply 4):
I really thing the routing is dictated by PFM.

What is that, performance flight model? Or what..

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