Delta2058
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Fuel Quantity Verification

Thu Aug 06, 2009 1:41 pm

Once the crew determines the fuel load for a flight, how to they verify that the correct amount is onboard? Is the digital readout on the EICAS sufficient or is there a way they double check that the indicated fuel is indeed onboard?

How common is it to have to off-load fuel to reduce weight before takeoff? Is this done by simply pumping it out of the plane back into the fuel truck?

I imagine the process is pretty efficient since a crew may inherit a plane with an inappropriate fuel load for the next leg.

Thanks.
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Dalmd88
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Thu Aug 06, 2009 2:21 pm

Fuel quantity readings are usually fine. If the gage or the system is inop they can go out to the wing and use a dipstick type of reading. The dipstick is actually less acurate. The capacitance system takes into account the density of the fuel. The dipstick is just a volume reading. The fuel sticks are found on the bottom of the wing.
 
CosmicCruiser
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Thu Aug 06, 2009 2:37 pm

First the dispatcher determines the fuel load and the capt accepts it or request more. In the jet the F/O tallys the arrival fuel slip with the upload fuel slip to compare what the fueler has put on board. This info is entered into ACARS and uploaded to ops. This should reflect the fuel gauges qty. Also on the -11 there's 2 sets of fuel qty indications.
 
fr8mech
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Thu Aug 06, 2009 3:36 pm

Take the fuel remaining, add the fuel uplifted and you have total fuel onboard.

The fuel uplift number (usually, in gallons) comes from the meter on the truck. Therefore, you will have 2 seperate indication systems, aircraft and truck, working together to get the right number. If the aircraft system is off, the total fuel won't tally, same with the truck.
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Mender
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Thu Aug 06, 2009 6:32 pm



Quoting Delta2058 (Thread starter):
a crew may inherit a plane with an inappropriate fuel load for the next leg

Very rare, the aircraft would normally have very little fuel remaining when it lands so it nearly always needs additional fuel to go anywhere. I know sometimes the crew will "tanker" (take off with round trip fuel load) but again the aircraft will rarely need to defuel.

If they do need to defuel it can take a long time to find an empty bowser to receive the fuel so it's avoided at all costs.
 
Tristarsteve
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Thu Aug 06, 2009 8:57 pm



Quoting Mender (Reply 4):
If they do need to defuel it can take a long time to find an empty bowser to receive the fuel so it's avoided at all costs.

Fuel companies keep their bowsers full. It keeps the air out of the tank, and reduces the amount of water in the fuel (The water precipitates out of the air).
So if you need to defuel, first you have to ask the fuel company to empty a bowser. If you are lucky and a widebody is awaiting refuelling, this may happen in 45 mins., If you have a row of props, it could take a few hours. Then when you defuel, the fuel in the bowser is yours. It cannot be sold to anyone else. It either goes back into one of your planes, or is disposed of.

We all know this. When refuelling, you are always very careful not to cause problems by putting on too much. When a plane is standing on the ramp with too much fuel, then OPS tries to work out how to use the aircraft without defuelling. If it is landing weight limited, they may just increase the routing to use the fuel. Its much cheaper than defuelling! Or they may put it on another service, or offload the freight. Anything to save defuelling.
 
josekmlb
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Aug 07, 2009 3:21 am



Quoting DALMD88 (Reply 1):
dipstick type of reading

Hate that dipstick if you pull it out the wrong way and get fuel on you if you cant see the arrow on it.
 
Phoenix9
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Aug 07, 2009 3:30 am



Quoting JoseKMLB (Reply 6):
Hate that dipstick if you pull it out the wrong way and get fuel on you

Heck, if you don't pull out on time, things can get pretty serious with wife/gf.

(sorry couldn't resist)

------

Anyways...on topic, so does each of the airport calibrate their equipment to standard temperature? or does it vary from hot to cold climates. Since the temperature will change density of the fuel, wouldn't it affect the amount loaded?
Life only makes sense when you look at it backwards.
 
josekmlb
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Aug 07, 2009 5:23 am



Quoting Phoenix9 (Reply 7):
Heck, if you don't pull out on time, things can get pretty serious with wife/gf.

(sorry couldn't resist)

Funny guy there lol.

Pilots cockpit readings are very good to the fuel load on their airplanes, but when the plane has an inop fuel gauge the pilot has to put all his trust into the fuel er that he fueled the plane the right way. If he measured the pitch and roll of the aircraft wrong like saying the pitch is 2.5 but it really is -2.5 he can miss fuel that airplane and make a bad imbalance of the plane.



Quoting CosmicCruiser (Reply 2):
First the dispatcher determines the fuel load and the capt accepts it or request more

Seen it alot of the times when the pilot asks for a few hundred or so pounds when they know bad wheather will be at their dest. airport.
 
Valkyrie01
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Aug 07, 2009 6:37 am



Quoting JoseKMLB (Reply 8):
Pilots cockpit readings are very good to the fuel load on their airplanes, but when the plane has an inop fuel gauge the pilot has to put all his trust into the fuel er that he fueled the plane the right way. If he measured the pitch and roll of the aircraft wrong like saying the pitch is 2.5 but it really is -2.5 he can miss fuel that airplane and make a bad imbalance of the plane.

Where can i find those fueler at. I know when we have an inop fuel gauge mx has to go and verify the correct amount of fuel is loaded. Known fuel quanity , fuel stick etc
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DC8FriendShip
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Aug 07, 2009 6:59 am



Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 5):
It cannot be sold to anyone else. It either goes back into one of your planes, or is disposed of.

Wrong! that has to do with company policy, and whether a buyer is willing to buy "used" fuel. but as long as it is clean, it is legal to resell defueled fuel.
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HAWK21M
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Aug 07, 2009 8:56 am



Quoting JoseKMLB (Reply 6):
Hate that dipstick if you pull it out the wrong way and get fuel on you if you cant see the arrow on it.

Not all Aircraft have Dripsticks,some have Fuel measuring sticks that don't drip but show the fuel level via a magnetic float holding the stick.

Out here Defuelling requires a seperate Bowser & can take approx an hour to be ready as no fuelling company keeps one empty.

After knowing the departure fuel in Kgs,deducting the Arrival fuel in kgs from this.One knows the Fuel uplift needed in kgs,knowing the Sp gravity of the Fuel being supplied,the uplift in litres can be calculated to be a cross check.

regds
MEL.
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Tristarsteve
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Aug 07, 2009 5:08 pm



Quoting Phoenix9 (Reply 7):
Anyways...on topic, so does each of the airport calibrate their equipment to standard temperature? or does it vary from hot to cold climates. Since the temperature will change density of the fuel, wouldn't it affect the amount loaded?

Fuel on board aircraft is measured in weight, kgs or lbs.
Fuel delivered is measured in volume, litres gallons or US gallons.
So we have to multiply the delivered fuel volume by the specific gravity to get it into weight, which can then be compared to the aircraft weight of fuel.

So if an aircraft arrives with 2000kg on board, and I pump in 10000 litres, and the density (spec gravity) is 0.8 then I have added 8000 kg, and the fuel gauges should read 10000 kg.
Each airline has an allowed discrepancy, about 300kg on an A320 up to 2000kg on a B744. If the sums match you are OK.

The density is measured when refuelling. The bowser will deliver a couple of litres into a bottle and a floating gauge measured the density. This will change all the time, but from the same refinery will be higher in the winter and lower in the summer, Here it ranges from 0.810 in winter down to 0.790 in summer. It is basically temp dependent. But different refineries deliver fuel at different SGs.
The airlines like high SG fuel. They pay by the litre. High SG fuel gives you more energy per litre, so you need less litres to fill the tanks.
 
josekmlb
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Aug 07, 2009 10:15 pm



Quoting Valkyrie01 (Reply 9):
Where can i find those fueler at. I know when we have an inop fuel gauge mx has to go and verify the correct amount of fuel is loaded. Known fuel quanity , fuel stick etc

Well try ASIG here when I was a fueler now I just do ramp but DL holds a class for inop fuel gauge's for each plane they have and when I did it it was back in the L-1011 and 727 days. But they still hold the classes. Its not hard at all to do the plane. Most planes have more than one way to do them like cockpit gauge's, meter, fuel transfer from tank to tank, and drip/magna stick. As long as we did the class and passed it we do not need a mx to come check it out.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 11):

Think most if not all boeing planes have the dripstick. The 737-200 seemed like for DL always had an inop gauge. The MD-88 has the magna stick
 
Valkyrie01
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sat Aug 08, 2009 5:27 am



Quoting JoseKMLB (Reply 13):
Well try ASIG here when I was a fueler now I just do ramp but DL holds a class for inop fuel gauge's for each plane they have and when I did it it was back in the L-1011 and 727 days. But they still hold the classes. Its not hard at all to do the plane. Most planes have more than one way to do them like cockpit gauge's, meter, fuel transfer from tank to tank, and drip/magna stick. As long as we did the class and passed it we do not need a mx to come check it out.

Where you authorized to make a log book entry and signed it off? lets take a 737 for example a fuel quanity indicator for the main tank is inop,it's place on MEL.Part of the MEL is prior to each departure verify the fuel quanity in the associate main tank and record successful accomplishment in the aircraft maintenance logbook.Well thats how it is for the airline i work for,maybe other airlines do it different.
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jetmech
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sat Aug 08, 2009 6:06 am



Quoting JoseKMLB (Reply 13):
Think most if not all boeing planes have the dripstick.

The 747 (and 767?) has dipsticks. The 707 had dripsticks. Not sure about the types in-between the 707 and 747 however, but I presume that the 777 would have dipsticks. A330 / A340 also use dipsticks.

Regards, JetMech
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EcuadorianMD11
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sat Aug 08, 2009 7:17 am

Would it be possible to post a pic of a dipstick?
(And I´m not referring to Delboy & Rodney Trotter).

I wonder where exactly this stick is positioned (on an average modern jet liner) and how you can pull out a plug out of the bottom without getting drenched.
According to some posts on this thread there is a "right" and a "wrong" way of doing it........(like drinking beer out of boot-shaped glass) but I find it hard to picture how this system would work.

I work with fuel tank soundings and sounding tape etc myself so the whole subject is not too uncommon for me!

Cheers,

Ecuadorian MD11.
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josekmlb
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:02 am



Quoting JetMech (Reply 15):

OK the 727 and the 737s had the drip sticks those were the planes that I was use to having the dripstick and not really thinking about the 57 and on.

Quoting Valkyrie01 (Reply 14):
Where you authorized to make a log book entry and signed it off? lets take a 737 for example a fuel quanity indicator for the main tank is inop,it's place on MEL.Part of the MEL is prior to each departure verify the fuel quanity in the associate main tank and record successful accomplishment in the aircraft maintenance logbook.Well thats how it is for the airline i work for,maybe other airlines do it different.

There was no log entry to sign off for a inop gauge on DL A/C the only thing we had to do is fill out our FSR (Fuel Service Record) and hand it over to the pilots. This is what we would do on arrival of the plane. First get the grid charts for the plane that is coming in, 2nd we would pull down the drip stick(737-200) and measure what the fuel qty is for the tank, 3rd after getting the fuel qty you would get in the main gear door area to measure the pitch and roll of the plane, 4th you would go to the grid charts and see what settings on the drip stick should be set at for the certain fuel load, 5th you would then pump fuel into the tank until fuel started to drip from the stick and you would stop, and last you would fill out the FSR and turn it in. The only time MX would have to check it was if there were no person that passed a inop gauge class.

Quoting EcuadorianMD11 (Reply 16):
I wonder where exactly this stick is positioned (on an average modern jet liner) and how you can pull out a plug out of the bottom without getting drenched.
According to some posts on this thread there is a "right" and a "wrong" way of doing it........(like drinking beer out of boot-shaped glass) but I find it hard to picture how this system would work.

I work with fuel tank soundings and sounding tape etc myself so the whole subject is not too uncommon for me!

Cheers,

Ecuadorian MD11.

The sticks are under the wing and there should be 4 down the line you pull out which ones you need to use via your grid charts. Some have the dripsticks with arrows that show which way the fuel will drip out and others have the magnasticks in them which dont drip out.
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:22 am



Quoting JoseKMLB (Reply 13):
Think most if not all boeing planes have the dripstick.

Not on a B757.
regds
MEL.
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boeing767mech
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:55 am



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 18):
Quoting JoseKMLB (Reply 13):
Think most if not all boeing planes have the dripstick.

Not on a B757.
regds
MEL.

Then how do you stick the tank?????
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fr8mech
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sat Aug 08, 2009 12:30 pm



Quoting JoseKMLB (Reply 13):
Think most if not all boeing planes have the dripstick.

I haven't worked the B737-xxx, but I've worked B727/747/757/767 and only the B727 has drip-sticks. The rest have magna-sticks.

Quoting EcuadorianMD11 (Reply 16):
I wonder where exactly this stick is positioned (on an average modern jet liner) and how you can pull out a plug out of the bottom without getting drenched

Depending on aircraft, there can be more than one per tank. On a magna-stick (dipstick) the stick is inside a housing. The housing is inside the tank. The tip of the stick is ferrous or a magnet. Around the housing is a donut magnet that is free to float up and down with the fuel level. When you pull the stick, it should be dry.

A drip stick, on the other hand, is wet. It is a hollow tube. When the top of the tube reaches the top of the fuel, the tube fills and fuel comes out the bottom. The arrow on the bottom will point in the direction the fuel should come out.

Both sticks are usually graduated in inches and there are charts to convert from inches to fuel weight.

Hope that makes sense.
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josekmlb
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sat Aug 08, 2009 6:56 pm

Yeah for some reason I thought most Boeing A/C had the drips but only the 727 and 37s have them you guys are right about the 57 on with the magna sticks. I was just remembering with what planes we worked on. Now I know the 37-200 has the drips I really dont know about the 800 if they are the drips or magna?
 
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jetmech
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sun Aug 09, 2009 5:45 am



Quoting Boeing767mech (Reply 19):
Then how do you stick the tank?????

I suspect it may be with a dipstick on a 757. Going by the posts in this thread, it appears that Boeing changed over from drip-sticks to dipsticks after the 737 classic.

Regards, JetMech
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josekmlb
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sun Aug 09, 2009 7:56 am



Quoting JetMech (Reply 22):

Yeah they have the magna sticks in them.
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sun Aug 09, 2009 9:42 am

Quoting Boeing767mech (Reply 19):
Then how do you stick the tank?????

Using Measuring sticks.

Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 20):
Depending on aircraft, there can be more than one per tank. On a magna-stick (dipstick) the stick is inside a housing. The housing is inside the tank. The tip of the stick is ferrous or a magnet. Around the housing is a donut magnet that is free to float up and down with the fuel level. When you pull the stick, it should be dry.

A drip stick, on the other hand, is wet. It is a hollow tube. When the top of the tube reaches the top of the fuel, the tube fills and fuel comes out the bottom. The arrow on the bottom will point in the direction the fuel should come out.

Both sticks are usually graduated in inches and there are charts to convert from inches to fuel weight

Thats correct
Fuel tank Measuring sticks is the term used on the B757.
Customer option for the measuring sticks can come in units of Inches/pounds/litres or kgs.

regds
MEL.

[Edited 2009-08-09 02:45:27]
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EcuadorianMD11
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sun Aug 09, 2009 11:40 pm



Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 20):
Hope that makes sense.

Yep, it does.........very much so.
The magnetic donut goes around the housing of the dipstick and sits at a certain level as it floats on top of the fuel.
When I pull the dipstick out slowly it will come to a (mild) stop as I pass the magnetic donut.........and so I can get an accurate reading at the bottom of my stick.
Then I´d go to my conversion table (probably posted in my fuel truck) and check on the quantity of fuel with a X sounding on this X type of aircraft.

Is that correct?

I always read A1 Jet Fuel.........are there any other kinds for modern jet liners?

How´s the quality of the fuel generally speaking?
On the ships we have a lot of problems with water in the fuel etc.
We take samples, but still...........

Cheers,

Ecuadorian MD11.
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jetmech
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Mon Aug 10, 2009 4:35 am



Quoting EcuadorianMD11 (Reply 25):
Then I´d go to my conversion table (probably posted in my fuel truck) and check on the quantity of fuel with a X sounding on this X type of aircraft.

In addition to the actual depth reading, you will also need to know the attitude of the aircraft. On the 747 for example, there are two spirit levels in the wheel well, one giving a reading in degrees with respect to nose up/down, the other giving a reading in degrees with respect to the roll angle.

To establish the actual fuel mass, you go to the page in the fuelling book that has the correct specific gravity for the day, find the appropriate roll and pitch angle, and then read off the fuel mass corresponding to the dipstick reading.

Airbus A330 / A340 are similar, except they use a "2 dimensional" spirit level to give the attitude reading. This device is a round piece of glass with a very shallow dome shape having a grid inscribed upon it. It can be found next to the fuelling panel.

A small bubble inside the device will gravitate to one of the grid points. You take note of the letter - number combination labelling this grid point, and look for it in the fuelling manual to account for the attitude of the aircraft

Quoting EcuadorianMD11 (Reply 25):
How´s the quality of the fuel generally speaking?

The fuel trucks generally have a filter that reacts with any water in the fuel. Apparently, this reaction clogs the filter and stops fuel from flowing. You can also drain off samples to manually check for water, which the fuel truck operator should do for each aircraft.

Regards, JetMech
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glen
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Mon Aug 10, 2009 7:30 am



Quoting EcuadorianMD11 (Reply 25):
How´s the quality of the fuel generally speaking?



Quoting JetMech (Reply 26):
The fuel trucks generally have a filter that reacts with any water in the fuel. Apparently, this reaction clogs the filter and stops fuel from flowing. You can also drain off samples to manually check for water, which the fuel truck operator should do for each aircraft.

The fuel uplift is normally very clean. However in the tanks there is some accumulation of water over time (condensed water out of the air).

On the Airbus we have a system separating fuel and water, but it works most efficiently only on ground when the aircraft is not moving as the water can settle down at the lowest part of the tanks then.
We had a problem with one plane a few years ago, flying always the same route with only short ground times and humid conditions for quite a time. By time the fuel indication got worse and worse, i.e. difference between calculated and indicated fuel on board getting out of tolerance. Finally when the a/c was on ground for one day there was more than 1 ton of water to be drained...
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pilotpip
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Mon Aug 10, 2009 8:40 pm



Quoting EcuadorianMD11 (Reply 25):
How´s the quality of the fuel generally speaking?

At both FBOs I worked for back in the day we had to do a quality control check on the fuel before accepting it from the refinery. It was then filtered as it entered our holding tanks from the delivery truck. Filtered again when it was put into our trucks. Filtered a third time as it was delivered from the truck to the aircraft.

The holding tanks and trucks are sampled daily at the sump and downstream of the filters. If the fuel has any contamination (water, particulate) we drain until it's gone. This fuel is not put back in the tanks, it's what we run our GPU and fuel trucks on.

In short, it's held to very high standards.
DMI
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:48 am



Quoting EcuadorianMD11 (Reply 25):
How´s the quality of the fuel generally speaking?
On the ships we have a lot of problems with water in the fuel etc.
We take samples, but still...........

Quality control checks are carried out by the Fuel vendors on their Storage & delivery facilities reguralarly.In addition pre,mid & post fueling sample checks are carried out.
regds
MEL.
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surfpunk
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Tue Oct 06, 2009 9:04 pm

When I worked at MSP, we were not certified to perform inop gauge work ourselves (other than the actual delivery of the fuel). MX for the airline would have to verify stick measurements, pitch/roll attitude, etc to verify the amount of fuel in the inop tank. MX would have the final stick reading for the bad tank based on the charts, and we would fill until that stick either peed or mag-stuck (depending on the A/C). I remember getting peed on more than one time by the 727 dripsticks, though. Mechanics thought they were being funny.

Our tank farm operators took density/SG measurements several times a day (at MSP it was necessary due to sometimes wide temperature variation during the day). Fuel was also filtered several times...upon delivery from Koch Refinery, as it left the tanks into the hydrant system, and in the trucks. We had sump tanks on the trucks that we would drain daily. Airline MX (with the exception of US) would drain the aircraft sumps in the morning for RON aircraft. We did the sump draining for USAir aircraft (they hadn't changed their name when I worked at MSP) for RON aircraft only.

I will say this...doing an inop gauge was much easier than doing an inop valve. Those generally required overwing fueling, and I got to do that to a UA DC-8 one cold winter morning during a busy ORD diversion day. Not the most pleasant place to be, that day, up on the wing of a DC-8.
 
JETPILOT
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Wed Oct 07, 2009 8:48 am

As an FE on the DC8 some years ago our company procedure on international flights was to drip the tanks. I remember doing #1 and #4 aux tanks which are out on the wintips and I had to stand on the very top of the painters ladder we had in the belly of the plane. The wing tip was probbably 15 feet in the air and I was scarrred to death of falling off that ladder.

On top of that experience we had dripsticks and if you didn't calculate the wind direction correctly you got covered with JET A and had a really sh*tty flight. Sometimes the dripsticks would fall out and had to shove them back in against a nice steady stream of JET A pissing out.

FUN!
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Thu Oct 08, 2009 10:44 am

Refuelling with an INOP fueling valve is much more time consuming on a B757 in comparism to a B737.
regds
MEL.
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
josekmlb
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Oct 16, 2009 1:33 am



Quoting EcuadorianMD11 (Reply 25):
How´s the quality of the fuel generally speaking?
On the ships we have a lot of problems with water in the fuel etc.
We take samples, but still...........

Yeah each morning we use to sump the trucks and the planes that sat for over 3hrs. Now I don't even think they sump the planes anymore, but when I did it you would get a bit of water here and there. I remember getting a fuel bath sumping a DL-MD88 because the sump got stuck in the wing and when it finally came out I got a really nice JET-A bath.
 
LH526
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Oct 16, 2009 1:51 am



Quoting EcuadorianMD11 (Reply 25):
I always read A1 Jet Fuel.........are there any other kinds for modern jet liners?

Jet A1 in comparison to the Jet A has a lower freezing point (−47 °C vs −40 °C) and several additives.
Jet A1 is usualy provided outside the US where US ports mostly service with Jet A
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tdscanuck
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RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Oct 16, 2009 4:42 am



Quoting Lh526 (Reply 34):

Jet A1 in comparison to the Jet A has a lower freezing point (−47 °C vs −40 °C) and several additives.
Jet A1 is usualy provided outside the US where US ports mostly service with Jet A

There's also TS-1, the Russian version of Jet A1, and JP-4, an older wide-cut fuel. Some older aircraft are certified for JP-4, but most new ones aren't because basically no commercial operation uses it anymore.

A fuel guy I know told me JP-4's remaining purpose in life is powering Arctic/Antarctic helicopters.

Tom.
 
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HAWK21M
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Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2001 10:05 pm

RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Fri Oct 16, 2009 8:11 am



Quoting JoseKMLB (Reply 33):
Now I don't even think they sump the planes anymore,

Out here only Draining for water extraction on a 24hr halt a couple of hrs prior to refuelling & complete draining of the tanks carried out during a check C.
regds
MEL.
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
crjfixer
Posts: 26
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 5:15 am

RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sat Oct 17, 2009 8:06 am



Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 36):


Quoting JoseKMLB (Reply 33):
Now I don't even think they sump the planes anymore,

Out here only Draining for water extraction on a 24hr halt a couple of hrs prior to refuelling & complete draining of the tanks carried out during a check C.
regds
MEL.

We sump ours every 3 days on a service check (CRJ-200)
 
sfotom
Posts: 26
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 9:50 pm

RE: Fuel Quantity Verification

Sun Oct 18, 2009 2:30 am



Quoting EcuadorianMD11 (Reply 16):
Would it be possible to post a pic of a dipstick?
(And I´m not referring to Delboy & Rodney Trotter).

This is the bottom of the wing of a 737-300. The fuel stick is the dark spot in the tank entry plate.

Big version: Width: 1031 Height: 1536 File size: 452kb


Depending on when they came off the line, 737-300s had "Drip Sticks", or "Mag Sticks" Our company had some aircraft of each type. Usually the "Drip Sticks" had an arrow, to warn you where the hole on the stick was to avoid getting yourself covered, but not always. (by the way, you needed to remember that the stick rotated as it was unlocked and the hole could end up pointing in a very different direction than where it started.)

This is a close up of a "Drip Stick" (NOTE: this particular one does not have an arrow)

Big version: Width: 698 Height: 618 File size: 531kb



And this one is a "Mag (Dripless) Stick"

Big version: Width: 652 Height: 618 File size: 583kb

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