lenbrazil
Topic Author
Posts: 109
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 11:08 am

Validity Of Overseas Pilot’s Certificates In The U

Fri Aug 27, 2010 3:19 pm

There is someone on the web who claims to be a pilot and to have worked in the past as a commercial pilot flying “heavy aircraft”. He implied, but did not state directly he had done so recently. The problem is that he is NOT listed in the FAA database. He was born in Asia and claims to have gone to university in Britain. He indicated he became a pilot after earning his degree and that he moved to the US (from the UK} in 1972, it is not clear if he claims to have become a pilot in the US or UK. So my questions are

• If he moved to the US in 1972 with a UK license could he have worked as a pilot without getting a US certificate or other document that would appear in the database?

• If so would there have been some sort of time limit (i.e. 6 months, 2 years etc}?

• Is it possible he did get a US certificate back then but for some reason doesn’t show up? Anything is possible of course, but have any of you heard about old licensees not showing up?

This guy has made some controversial claims but I don’t want that to influence anyone’s answers.
 
Fly2HMO
Posts: 7207
Joined: Sat Jan 24, 2004 12:14 pm

RE: Validity Of Overseas Pilot’s Certificates In The U

Sat Aug 28, 2010 1:43 am

I don't know about the FARs back then, but I do know there's a few current FARs that do seem to imply you need an FAA license to be able to fly a US registered plane, though I don't recall a specific FAR that is meant to actually define that. Then again ICAO guidelines do stipulate that your certificate is valid worldwide as long as it meets the minimum requirements for the country you intend to fly in.

[Edited 2010-08-27 18:45:05]
 
Gemuser
Posts: 4301
Joined: Mon Nov 24, 2003 12:07 pm

RE: Validity Of Overseas Pilot’s Certificates In The U

Sat Aug 28, 2010 4:22 am

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 1):
Then again ICAO guidelines do stipulate that your certificate is valid worldwide as long as it meets the minimum requirements for the country you intend to fly in.

You used to be required in Australia to take an "Air Legislation" exam to validate your FAA, other national aviation authority license, to fly Australian registered aircraft. AFAIK that is still the case. I believe it is similar in most countries, although the details and procedures will differ.

Of course you can fly a US registered aircraft in Australia on your FAA license, although the aircraft can only stay so long in the country without going thru the Customs/import rigmarole.

Gemuser
DC23468910;B72172273373G73873H74374475275376377L77W;A319 320321332333343;BAe146;C402;DHC6;F27;L188;MD80MD85
 
User avatar
Francoflier
Posts: 3700
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2001 12:27 pm

RE: Validity Of Overseas Pilot’s Certificates In The U

Sat Aug 28, 2010 9:30 am

A commercial pilot flying any kind of 'heavy aircraft' with a N tail number would need to have an FAA license in order to be hired by the operator.

But he might have been hired by a foreign company operating in and out of the US while holding a foreign license, flying aircrafts with the appropriate foreign tail number.

Many foreign airlines have pilots based in the US.
I'll do my own airline. With Blackjack. And hookers. In fact, forget the airline.
 
lenbrazil
Topic Author
Posts: 109
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 11:08 am

RE: Validity Of Overseas Pilot’s Certificates In The U

Sat Aug 28, 2010 7:31 pm

I don't think he could have been working for a British company. According to a mini bio he "...left Scotland for America in 1972. He lived in Alaska for 15 years..." how many company's were flying the London - Ancorage route back then?

He also claimed to have a “degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Edinburgh” but a} the school does not offer such a degree
b} it has not offered since at least 2002 (the oldest page I could find on the Internet Archive}
c} Google searches turned up no references to the university ever offering such a degree or anyone else claiming to have taught or studied the subject there.

So he seems to have been making up a background in aviation.
 
lenbrazil
Topic Author
Posts: 109
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 11:08 am

RE: Validity Of Overseas Pilot’s Certificates In The U

Tue Aug 31, 2010 12:41 am

I found the guy's website and according to the bio on it He arrived in the US " armed with a degree in aeronautical engineering, [and] a commercial pilot’s license" and that" "Bidding adieu to civilization he migrated to the sub-zero wastes of Alaska’s North Slope where, as a pilot in the service of various air charter operators, he hauled roughnecks and rigs to remote oilfield camps strewn about the Arctic." This would have been in 1972 or 3 he indicated he contined to work as a pilot till ´76 or ´77

Is it realistic that " various air charter operators" would have hired a pilot with a UK license to fly planes big enough to carry rig equipment? Might they have ingnored such formalities back then in such an isolated location?
 
Braniff747SP
Posts: 2565
Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2008 4:56 am

RE: Validity Of Overseas Pilot’s Certificates In The U

Tue Aug 31, 2010 3:22 am

Quoting lenbrazil (Reply 5):

If the plane was not registered in the US, maybe. Why would it have to be US registered.? It could have been a foreign company with a foreign Reggie.
The 747 will always be the TRUE queen of the skies!
 
lenbrazil
Topic Author
Posts: 109
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 11:08 am

RE: Validity Of Overseas Pilot’s Certificates In The U

Tue Aug 31, 2010 1:08 pm

Quoting Braniff747SP (Reply 6):
Quoting lenbrazil (Reply 5):

If the plane was not registered in the US, maybe. Why would it have to be US registered.? It could have been a foreign company with a foreign Reggie.

Is it, or was it, common for foreign companies to do domestic charter work in the US with pilots not licensed in the US? As a layman I'd be surprised that the FAA would allow this. Flying to and from their home country (or other countries en route) is one thing but domestic operations, I would hope were something else.

Also since he claimed to have worked for "various" companies we would have to assume there several foreign operators doing this on the north shore of Alaska.

But if that were the case, would the companies have to be British (like his license) or would that depended on the regulations of the country where the plane was registered?

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 15 guests