washingtonian
Topic Author
Posts: 749
Joined: Sat Sep 04, 2010 5:56 pm

International Flight Catering

Tue Jan 18, 2011 9:10 pm

How do airlines with elaborate First/Business class meals cater longhaul flights? Let's use Continental at Newark as an example. Obviously they can cater a EWR-LHR flight from their EWR base....But does the LHR-EWR flight use local catering, or does Continental load up a EWR-LHR flight with the food/drinks necessary for the return LHR-EWR flight? At least as far BusinessFirst meals go....
 
aklrno
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Joined: Sat Dec 04, 2010 11:18 pm

RE: International Flight Catering

Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:12 pm

Local catering unless there is some special problem.

I once flew in F from DFW to some place in Europe where the caterers were on strike, so AA had to carry the meals for both directions out of DFW. Because of the space restrictions the food was pitiful, but it wasn't AA's fault.
 
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airportugal310
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RE: International Flight Catering

Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:54 pm

Quoting aklrno (Reply 1):
I once flew in F from DFW to some place in Europe where the caterers were on strike, so AA had to carry the meals for both directions out of DFW. Because of the space restrictions the food was pitiful, but it wasn't AA's fault.

Dumb question from inquiring mind...

How is the weight of all the catering calculated? Standard weights like pax or something else?
I sell airplanes and airplane accessories
 
sunking737
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Joined: Tue Feb 22, 2005 10:33 pm

RE: International Flight Catering

Sat Jan 22, 2011 2:10 am

Quoting Airportugal310 (Reply 2):
How is the weight of all the catering calculated? Standard weights like pax or something else?

From experience all food carts, carriers, liquor kits, ice tubs and alike are weighed. All weighed empty and then full. A full size soda cart can weigh as much as 200 lbs., each ice tubs has 5 lbs of ice. Every cart, carrier goes in a certain spot in the galley as they have numbers. So fwd galley right side of plane backing cockpit is galley 1, or R1, space next to coffee maker is say 101. half size trash can can be in 109. Oh we had to weigh the trash cart. Fwd galley right side backing F/C is galley 2, or R2 galley storage by main door galley 3, L3. Rear galley takes up full width of coach Galley 4. This was for a 737--800. MX can weigh a plane from time to time as plane gets old and get loaded down with dirt and grease. Empty weight of plane includes the ovens as they don't get removed in between flights.

The galley manufacture has weight limits for each slot. IIRC the heaviest cart or carrier was placed in the middle rear galley that would be the liquor cart, or supply carrier, with the soda cart next to it. We placed heaviest in middle or outside towards aisle. I hope this answers any questions.
Just an MSPAVGEEK
 
SwissVA
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Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2011 5:09 am

RE: International Flight Catering

Fri Jan 28, 2011 12:50 am

Concerning CO, they use a logistical catering oriented company called Pourshins ( http://www.pourshins.com/ ).
This company works pretty much like a distribution center for a variety of goods and that way they can control costs and quality better.

The problem is when you rely on local caterers and there local produce and labour charges, the prices might fluctuate and your overall cost control and quality can get out of hand.
In airlines, a uniform product is essential and these type of companies basically take care of all that while you as an airline can spend time and money on defining your product.

The Sabre/Airserve system is another popular type used by many airlines developed by AA if I am not mistaken.

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