Grisee08
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How Do I Read This?

Sun Sep 08, 2013 7:12 pm

Taken from another thread, I've always wondered how to read all of this? Is there a simple way to explain it?

VTBS 081900Z 33003KT 9999 FEW020 BKN120 BKN300 25/22 Q1011 NOSIG
VTBS 081830Z 31003KT 9999 FEW020 BKN120 BKN300 25/22 Q1011 NOSIG
VTBS 081800Z 30002KT 9999 FEW020 BKN120 BKN300 25/22 Q1012 NOSIG
VTBS 081730Z VRB01KT 9999 FEW020 BKN120 BKN300 25/22 Q1012 NOSIG
VTBS 081700Z 00000KT 9999 FEW020 BKN120 BKN300 25/22 Q1012 NOSIG
VTBS 081630Z 00000KT 9999 FEW020 BKN120 BKN300 26/23 Q1012 NOSIG
VTBS 081600Z 00000KT 9999 FEW020 BKN120 BKN300 26/22 Q1012 NOSIG
VTBS 081530Z VRB01KT 9999 FEW020 BKN120 BKN300 26/22 Q1013 NOSIG

I've always wondered about the flight plan as well. It contains a whole jumble of numbers and letters that I cannot understand.
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kaitak
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Sun Sep 08, 2013 7:16 pm

OK, not an expert, but here goes:
VTBS - Bangkok Intl
The last four digits before the time are the zulu time, i.e. GMT + 1, so 1900z is 0100 local time.
33003, means wind from 330 at 3 knots (very light)
FEW 020 BKN 120 BKN 300 ... cloud levels.
Q 1013 - QNH 1013.
25/22 - temperature celsius?

In other words, fairly good weather at the time.
 
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jetblastdubai
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Sun Sep 08, 2013 7:19 pm

Bangkok Int'l airport 8th of the month at 1900Z wind 330 at 3 kts, visibility unlimited, few clouds at 2,000, 12,000 broken, 30,000 broken temp 25, dewpoint 22, QNH 1011, no significant changes

http://www.wunderground.com/metarFAQ.asp
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SpaceshipDC10
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Sun Sep 08, 2013 7:20 pm

Quoting Grisee08 (Thread starter):
Is there a simple way to explain it?

This could also help you.

http://www.ivao.aero/training/tutorials/metar/metar.htm
 
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817Dreamliiner
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Sun Sep 08, 2013 7:21 pm

Its not too hard

Quoting Grisee08 (Thread starter):
VTBS

Airport code for BKK

Quoting Grisee08 (Thread starter):
081900Z

Date and time

Quoting Grisee08 (Thread starter):
33003KT

Winds 330 degrees at 3 knots

Quoting Grisee08 (Thread starter):
9999

Visibility 10+ km

Quoting Grisee08 (Thread starter):
FEW020 BKN120 BKN300

Few clouds at 2000ft, Broken clouds at 12000ft BKN clouds at 30000ft

Quoting Grisee08 (Thread starter):
25/22

Temperature, 25, dew point 22

Quoting Grisee08 (Thread starter):
Q1011

Air pressure (QNH) 1011

Quoting Grisee08 (Thread starter):
NOSIG

no significant weather observed at this time

You can read it here:
http://aviationweather.gov/adds/meta...=most+recent+only&submitmet=Submit
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Starlionblue
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Sun Sep 08, 2013 11:42 pm

Quoting 817Dreamliiner (Reply 4):
Quoting Grisee08 (Thread starter):
Q1011

Air pressure (QNH) 1011

Just to expand, QNH (or in the US altimeter setting) is air pressure normalized to sea level using standard atmosphere conditions.

Quoting 817Dreamliiner (Reply 4):
Quoting Grisee08 (Thread starter):
NOSIG

no significant weather observed at this time

Nope. NOSIG is a trend code which means no significant change is expected in the next two hours.

The code which sort of corresponds to no significant weather is CAVOK, ceiling and visibility ok.
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817Dreamliiner
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Mon Sep 09, 2013 12:30 am

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 5):
Nope. NOSIG is a trend code which means no significant change is expected in the next two hours.

The code which sort of corresponds to no significant weather is CAVOK, ceiling and visibility ok.

Well, you need to tell ADDS that, because thats where I got it from:

METAR text: VTBS 081900Z 33003KT 9999 FEW020 BKN120 BKN300 25/22 Q1011 NOSIG
Conditions at: VTBS (CHON BURI/SATTAH, TH) observed 1900 UTC 08 September 2013
Temperature: 25.0°C (77°F)
Dewpoint: 22.0°C (72°F) [RH = 83%]
Pressure (altimeter): 29.85 inches Hg (1011.0 mb)
Winds: from the NNW (330 degrees) at 3 MPH (3 knots; 1.6 m/s)
Visibility: 6 or more miles (10+ km)
Ceiling: 12000 feet AGL
Clouds: few clouds at 2000 feet AGL
broken clouds at 12000 feet AGL
broken clouds at 30000 feet AGL
Weather: no significant weather observed at this time
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Grisee08
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Mon Sep 09, 2013 4:41 am

Thanks everyone... Something new I can study until I know it by heart
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KELPkid
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Mon Sep 09, 2013 4:50 am

Man, I miss the old format (what we used before TAFs and METARs in the USA). Granted, it wasn't what the rest of the world used, but it made a bit more sense to people with English as a first language...seems like I need a decoder wheel when I read a METAR or a TAF   
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Max Q
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Mon Sep 09, 2013 4:56 am

The whole practice of abbreviations is unneeded and an unnecessary cause of confusion.


In this day and age weather reports and forecasts should be presented in full and not have to be interpreted.


Why on earth is this accepted ?
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KELPkid
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Mon Sep 09, 2013 5:04 am

Quoting Max Q (Reply 9):
In this day and age weather reports and forecasts should be presented in full and not have to be interpreted.


Why on earth is this accepted ?

DUATS offers a plain English decode service for free (or at least it used to). However, in my experience, it got tripped up about 10% of the time...and it only worked for US airports. I can't check it at the moment, as I don't have a current FAA medical  
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Starlionblue
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Mon Sep 09, 2013 5:14 am

Quoting 817Dreamliiner (Reply 6):
Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 5):
Nope. NOSIG is a trend code which means no significant change is expected in the next two hours.

The code which sort of corresponds to no significant weather is CAVOK, ceiling and visibility ok.

Well, you need to tell ADDS that, because thats where I got it from:

The devil is in the details. "NOSIG" is translated as "No significant weather forecast". I looked up the code for No Significant Weather (note sans "forecast") and it is NSW. NOSIG is a trend indicator for the next two hours. NSW is current weather. This is also evidenced by NOSIG being at the end of the line in the trend group while NSW is in the weather description group, after visibility.


From ADDS:

BECMG 0905/0907 9999 NSW SCT003
Forecast period: 0500 UTC 09 September 2013 to 0000 UTC 10 September 2013
Forecast type: BECOMING: Conditions expected to become as follows by 0700 UTC 09 September 2013
Winds: from the E (90 degrees) at 6 MPH (5 knots; 2.6 m/s)
Visibility: 6 or more miles (10+ km)
Clouds: scattered clouds at 300 feet AGL
Weather: NSW (no significant weather)


Quoting Max Q (Reply 9):

The whole practice of abbreviations is unneeded and an unnecessary cause of confusion.

In this day and age weather reports and forecasts should be presented in full and not have to be interpreted.

Why on earth is this accepted ?

Tell me about it. Codes made sense when bandwidth was limited.

And don't get me started on Q codes. For the EASA exams you still need to know what the following mean:
QNF
QFE
QFF
QDR
QDM
QTE
QUJ

As one instructor put it, "Q codes were developed to confuse the enemy, and it's still working!"
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Mon Sep 09, 2013 8:12 am

Quoting Max Q (Reply 9):
In this day and age weather reports and forecasts should be presented in full and not have to be interpreted.

Amazingly this was just the at work last night.....

Whats the point........
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Fabo
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Mon Sep 09, 2013 1:53 pm

Because once you learn to read it it is perfectly good. Concise, fast, does not take much space (and trust me, if you have last 4 metars for every alternate on route, it can take a lot of space). Free word would just make it long and potentially confusing. Without factoring languages other than English, for example.

Besides, there are still applications where small dataprint still makes sense. Aircraft datalink for example.
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jetblueguy22
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RE: How Do I Read This?

Mon Sep 09, 2013 7:36 pm

Quoting Max Q (Reply 9):
In this day and age weather reports and forecasts should be presented in full and not have to be interpreted.


Why on earth is this accepted ?

I don't see why it is a bad thing. It is something we learned on day 2 of my ground school. I personally love METARs and TAFs. Instead of getting a huge paragraph about the weather, I get one short line that contains everything I need to know. Once you read a couple it isn't even that complicated. I thought the same thing when I first started my training. But now I love them.

Quoting Fabo (Reply 13):
Because once you learn to read it it is perfectly good. Concise, fast, does not take much space (and trust me, if you have last 4 metars for every alternate on route, it can take a lot of space)

I just got a briefing for a VFR flight from GFK-STP which I'm doing tomorrow just to see how many METARs I would get. I got 20 different reports along my route of flight. If that was all text it would take up 5 pages. Instead it takes up a page and tells me everything I need to know!
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