Thom@s
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Theoretically, This Shutterspeed Would Work. Or...

Fri Aug 31, 2001 4:48 pm

Hi there.

A thought crossed my mind the other day. When I'm out taking pics of stationary aircraft, I normally use 250 or 500 as my selected shutterspeed. I normally don't use a tripod for this, as I don't find it to be necessary.

But, would I get a desent picture if I used a tripod and took a pic of a stationary aircraft with 3-4 sec as the shutterspeed? Naturally I would make sure too much light wouldn't pass through the lens, so that it wouldn't go white.

Would the pic be ruined, or would it turn out nice and clear?

Thom@s
"If guns don't kill people, people kill people - does that mean toasters don't toast toast, toast toast toast?"
 
Jan Mogren
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RE: Theoretically, This Shutterspeed Would Work. Or...

Fri Aug 31, 2001 4:53 pm

As long as the camera isn't moving one tiny fraction of a bit during exposure... yes.
/JM
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jwenting
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RE: Theoretically, This Shutterspeed Would Work. Or...

Fri Aug 31, 2001 4:54 pm

many landscape photographers use exposures of about 5 seconds.
At those times, reciprocity failure of the film may start to have an effect on the exposure. This can lead to underexposure and/or colourcast depending on the film (some are better suited than others).
I suggest you read http://www.usefilm.com/articles/selectcolorfilm/index.php for a good intro in filmbehaveour.
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ckw
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RE: Theoretically, This Shutterspeed Would Work. Or...

Fri Aug 31, 2001 4:58 pm

Possible, but your tripod best be rock solid and

a) you should use a cable/remote release to fire the shutter. Failing that, use your camera's delayed exposure feature

b) if your camera has this feature, use the "mirror lock up" as this significantly reduces any vibration caused by the camera itself.

Cheers,

Colin
Colin K. Work, Pixstel
 
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RE: Theoretically, This Shutterspeed Would Work. Or...

Fri Aug 31, 2001 5:00 pm

3-4 seconds seems really long for daytime shooting, I get pin-point star images with my 50mm with exposures of 25 sec +, but I assume the heat distortion present during the daytime would blur the image more in a longer exposure then it would in a shorter one....especially with a long lens.

I think 1/60th or 1/125 would be more practical with a tripod, altough I don't think slower shutter speeds would make the exposure noticebly sharper.

One more thing, I also dont think you could stop down the lens enough to acheive the proper exposure with 3-4 sec, especially in sunny condtions.
 
Thom@s
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RE: Theoretically, This Shutterspeed Would Work. Or...

Fri Aug 31, 2001 5:04 pm

Thanks for the fast replies everyone.

So, it would work then. When you guys say the tripod must be rock solid, do you mean more solid than when useing the same shutterspeeds while taking night pics?

Thanks for that link there Jwenting, that'll be very usefull.

Erm, I don't have a cable, but I took this pic with about 4 sec shutterspeed.


Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Thomas Andre Hjelmen



If that is stabile enough for nightpics, wouldn't it do for photos taken in daylight?

Thom@s
"If guns don't kill people, people kill people - does that mean toasters don't toast toast, toast toast toast?"
 
Thom@s
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RE: Theoretically, This Shutterspeed Would Work. Or...

Fri Aug 31, 2001 5:08 pm

CYKA, I know 4 sec is a long time at daytime, but it's just experimental. I normally use a tripod for anything below 1/125 myself.

I could always try to get the lens down to the proper exposure.  Smile Worth a try anyway.

Thom@s
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jwenting
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RE: Theoretically, This Shutterspeed Would Work. Or...

Fri Aug 31, 2001 7:19 pm

Good filters to get long times in daylight are ND4 and ND8 (blocking 3/4 and 7/8 of incoming light).
Using Velvia (ISO 50) also helps.

I've done nightshots (not of aircraft) with exposure of several minutes. With such times, the emulsion really starts to break down with many films, leading to weird colours (but not unpleasant).
I wish I were flying
 
ckw
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RE: Theoretically, This Shutterspeed Would Work. Or...

Fri Aug 31, 2001 8:53 pm

If you can do long exposures at night, then you should be able to do it in daytime as well. But anything you can do to minimise the risk of vibration is worthwhile - better to get results based on preparation than luck!

If you don't have any ND filters to cut the light, you can use a polariser to knock a couple of stops off the exposure - even if the light is non-polarised.
Colin K. Work, Pixstel
 
mikephotos
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RE: Theoretically, This Shutterspeed Would Work. Or...

Sat Sep 01, 2001 12:39 am

Thom@s,

For the sharpest picture, think aperture rather than shutter speed when it comes to non-moving aircraft. Most lenses are sharpest at f8 or f11 rather than f22 or f32 (or f2.8/5.6). Check test-reports on your lens and find out. My lens test showed that f11 resulted in the sharpest slides from edge to center and 90% of my ramp shooting is done at f11. I shoot in sunny conditions most of the time so f11 works perfectly.

Michael

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