eddgge
Posts: 121
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2001 2:21 pm

Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 5:40 pm

I have a Nikon F-501 SLR body, a Nikkor 78-210 mm lens and a HP Photosmart S20 filmscanner.
I have tried to use both slide and negative films (Sensia 100 and Superia 100). When I scan these pics I always get a very grainy result (mostly on the sky and grass areas) and I always get my pics rejected here at a.net. I always try to photograph in good light conditions (sunny days).

So my question is, will some kind of filter help me? What filters are recommended? Or can it be something else that is wrong (the lens maybe)?

Best regards,
Gustaf
 
LGW
Posts: 4281
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2000 6:07 pm

RE: Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 6:01 pm

Can you show us an example please?

LGW
 
F27
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2001 11:59 pm

RE: Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 6:04 pm

I use the Hp photo scanner and i have never had these problems before could it be your lenses that re causing the ptoblem and not the scanner
 
eddgge
Posts: 121
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2001 2:21 pm

RE: Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 6:48 pm

Here is a example, not one of my best photos, but u can clearly see what I mean.

http://airliners.net/procphotos/rejphoto.main?filename=tf-fix-753.jpg

Gustaf
 
PUnmuth@VIE
Posts: 3119
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2000 9:31 pm

RE: Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 6:52 pm

-
 
ckw
Posts: 4586
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 12:26 am

RE: Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 8:03 pm

Looking at the example provided, I'm guessing part of the problem is slight underexposure (perhaps 1/2 stop) as there is very little detail in the shadow areas. Scanning underexposed film will always accentuate any grain. But I also think "noise" from the scanner another part of the problem - this is generally most apparant in the blue channel (ie. the sky!). All scanners generate noise, but this can be made worse by having the scanner too close to other equipment, poor power supply etc. Sometimes repositioning the scanner helps.

In the example provided, the effect has been made more obvious through sharpening - it appears you have sharpened the entire image. You could try selectively sharpening only parts of the image - for instance, masking out the sky would significantly reduce the visible graininess.

Apart from paying attention to exposure, I see no problem on the camera side of things - I can't image a circumstance in which the lens can increase or reduce grain, nor are there any filters.

Cheers,

Colin
Colin K. Work, Pixstel
 
eddgge
Posts: 121
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2001 2:21 pm

RE: Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 8:38 pm

Many thanx for Your answer Colin! I will try to move the scanner (it´s placed just beside my monitor) and to set the camera to another exposer time.

What about using a filter on the lens? I have heard that this may make better and more natrual colors on eg the sky, is this true? And what filter may be the right one to buy?

Gustaf
 
mirage
Posts: 3612
Joined: Mon May 31, 1999 4:44 am

RE: Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 9:06 pm

Try Fuji Reala 100, wonderful print film with almost no grain.

Luis
 
wietse
Posts: 3630
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2001 12:49 am

RE: Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 9:08 pm

Luis is right: Reala is the best print film for the price
Wietse de Graaf
 
ckw
Posts: 4586
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 12:26 am

RE: Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 9:16 pm

Filters - a UV filter can help reduce distant haze, but has no other effect on colours - some like to keep one on the lens permenantly as protection from scratches.

A Skylight filter is similar, but has a very slight warming effect

81A and 81B are stronger version of the above, and have a distinct warming effect - useful on dull days, or to take the blueness out of shadows in noon-day sun.

Polariser - for stunning blue skies with puffy white clouds - BUT - only works at certain angles to the sun, and requires 1 1/2 - 2 stops exposure compensation. Useless on dull days.

Cheers,

colin
Colin K. Work, Pixstel
 
Skymonster
Posts: 3428
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2001 7:53 pm

RE: Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 10:06 pm

Polariser - for stunning blue skies with puffy white clouds - BUT - only works at certain angles to the sun, and requires 1 1/2 - 2 stops exposure compensation

Just like to contend the exposure compensation thing on polarisers Colin... Might have been true when cameras didn't have TTL meters and everyone was toting a hand-held meter, but these days most modern SLR TTL meters should deal with a polariser without the user having to set any exposure compensation on camera. What is true of polarisers with moderns SLRs is that they will reduced the EV by 1 1/2 to 2 stops, effectively meaning a slower shutter speed or wider aperture.

[PEDANT MODE OFF]

One other thing to think about if anyone's contemplating a polariser - they come in linear or circular forms. Make sure you buy the one that's right for your camera's metering system, as the wrong one will wreck the exposure setting calculated by the camera's meter - most modern AF cameras need a circular polariser, which sadly are usually a bit more expensive than linear polarisers.

Andy
There are old pilots and there are bold pilots, but there are no old bold pilots
 
ckw
Posts: 4586
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 12:26 am

RE: Camera Problem

Tue May 28, 2002 11:31 pm

Andy - you're right of course, what I should have said is that you loose 1 1/2 - 2 stops. Must have been having a "senior moment".

But further cautions on polarisers - does the front of your lens rotate when focusing? If so, polarisers are a REAL pain. The polarisor works by your rotating one element of the filter over another - the correct amount of rotation is dependent on the angle of the light. If you set this up just right, and focusing then realigns the whole assembly, you have to start over again!

Cheers,

Colin
Colin K. Work, Pixstel
 
eddgge
Posts: 121
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2001 2:21 pm

RE: Camera Problem

Wed May 29, 2002 4:06 am

Oops, that sounds like a lot of "extra work"... My lens rotates when focusing so I guess a polariser is nothing for me :s

I might just try a UV filter as start  Big grin

Gustaf

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