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Fly-K
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Standard For Cabin Shots?

Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:20 pm

Out of disappointment with my cabin shots of Lufthansa's first A330 (I uploaded ten shots and got them all rejected), what are the preferred standards?
- full cabin wide angle or single seatrows? (I think both are interesting)
- with or without flash? (My problem is that my flash isn't very strong, while without flash, it's hard to get sufficient light, especially when the aircraft is on the ground, and there is little light from outside)
- with or without passengers? (probably without)

I really would have liked to show some of the pics...

Konstantin
Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been...
 
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RE: Standard For Cabin Shots?

Sat Dec 21, 2002 1:43 am


Wow, you got all cabin shots of the LH 330 rejected ?

I'd like to see what the quality of your shots is like as there are NO pictures of the cabin of this bird in the database yet.
Maybe you should try to enhance them a little, upload them again and hope for a screener who is aware of these rare shots.
I can hardly believe that your work was quality wise not good enough for the database when there is no such shot in there yet.

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ckw
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RE: Standard For Cabin Shots?

Sat Dec 21, 2002 1:51 am

Konstantin, I'll put my hand up to rejecting some of these - the main problem was colour - any I saw were distinctly blue. I wonder if you need to check your monitor calibration - it can drift over time, and the eye is very good at making its own colour corrections so you don't notice it.

But aside from that, flash photography inside cabins will always be problematic without sophisticated equipment - invariably the areas close to you will be overexposed, those further away underexposed. It's never pretty  Sad

To some extent, you can balance this in Photoshop, but again difficult to get right.

I would favour using available light and address the problem of finding a suitable way of supporting the camera for long exposures. Contrary to what might seem common sense, I would not use a high ISO. Afterall, you are probably into sub-handholding speeds even with ISO 400, so if you have to support the camera anyway, I'd use ISO 100 and ensure the best possible image quality.

Cheers,

Colin
Colin K. Work, Pixstel
 
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Fly-K
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RE: Standard For Cabin Shots?

Sat Dec 21, 2002 3:32 am

Colin the seats ARE blue  Wink/being sarcastic
OK I will try again, but I know it will be tough...
Konstantin
Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been...

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