EGFF
Topic Author
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Canon 300D Settings

Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:00 pm

Firstly, i do apologise if this is a subject that has popped up time after time, i tried a search of the forum but couldn't find anything.
I got myself a Canon 300D and am in the process of scanning through the manual trying to get myself familiarised with the different settings, buttons, etc.
I was just wondering what's the best setting to use for taking pics, so if you have a 300D any feedback is very much appreciated.
Regards,
Shaun
All together or not at all
 
sean377
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:06 pm

I'm in much the same position as you. I think the camera make and model is not so important, moreso the lens that's on the front of it. What I've learned so far is that all lenses are different, some producing softer images than others (particularly zooms at the extents of their ranges) and that many lenses produce their sharpest image at around f/8 - f/11. For that reason, a lot of people shoot in Av mode (aperture priority) to ensure that's what they get. From my (limited) experience, this produces adequate shutter speeds on a fine day.

Sean
EGNT

[Edited 2005-06-04 13:07:39]
Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man... Landing is the first!
 
QantasA332
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:07 pm

I don't use a 300D myself, but pretty much everyone I know who does recommends f/8.0 as the ideal f-stop quality-wise. So, if conditions are such that you get acceptable shutter speeds for the particular situation you're in, I suppose f/8.0 in Av mode would be good.

That's a start, I'm sure many experienced 300D users will jump in with more tips...  Wink

Cheers,
Gabriel
 
Jkw777
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:10 pm

Hello Shaun,

Firstly, Welcome to the world of Digital Photography using a DSLR.

There are no "best settings" for taking pictures, but it is easy enough to determine which settings are best for different conditions.

In sunny conditions, usually it is best to set your camera to the following:
Using "AV" Mode, ISO - ISO100, Aperture - f/8.0 or there abouts

If the conditions are somewhat cloudier, some factors need to change:
Using "AV" Mode, ISO - ISO200, Aperture - f/5.6-f/8.0

I would definitely do a lot of trial and error work when out shooting different conditions, to familiarise yourself with the camera and the different weather conditions as there are no basic settings.

Don't be too disappointed if you return from the airport with a card full of wasted images, the whole process of digital photography is a learning curve for all of us.

Good luck, regards,

Justin  Smile
jkw6210@btopenworld.com or +447751242989
 
dc10tim
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Sat Jun 04, 2005 9:01 pm

Hi Shaun,

I always shoot in Av mode and ideally with an aperture of between f8 and f11. Try not to use anything above ISO 200 if the light permits.

One thing I have found with shooting at f8 though this week, is to be careful when taking a photo of something close that is at an angle to you. The depth of field isn't as large as I expected and it's possible to get the rear of the aircraft out of focus slightly.

Regards,

Tim.
Obviously missing something....
 
Jkw777
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Sat Jun 04, 2005 9:08 pm

Quoting DC10Tim (Reply 4):
One thing I have found with shooting at f8 though this week, is to be careful when taking a photo of something close that is at an angle to you. The depth of field isn't as large as I expected and it's possible to get the rear of the aircraft out of focus slightly.

In that instance you would need to reduce the aperture to f/11.0 +, to increase DOF.

Regards,
Justin  Smile
jkw6210@btopenworld.com or +447751242989
 
sean377
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Sat Jun 04, 2005 9:09 pm

Quoting DC10Tim (Reply 4):
One thing I have found with shooting at f8 though this week, is to be careful when taking a photo of something close that is at an angle to you. The depth of field isn't as large as I expected and it's possible to get the rear of the aircraft out of focus slightly.

I'd noticed this too. Shooting a long-ish aircraft that is coming towards you may need the aperture nudged a few stops (towards f22). But watch the shutter speeds!

I agree about shooting in the lowest ISO that the light permits (I believe the Nikon D70 starts at ISO200. Is this a not a drawback?).

Sean
Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man... Landing is the first!
 
Jkw777
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Sat Jun 04, 2005 9:18 pm

Quoting Sean377 (Reply 6):
(I believe the Nikon D70 starts at ISO200. Is this a not a drawback?).

That is correct, but to be honest it's not a significant draw back in the grand scheme of things.

Cheers,
Justin  Smile
jkw6210@btopenworld.com or +447751242989
 
dc10tim
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Sun Jun 05, 2005 2:51 am

Quoting Jkw777 (Reply 5):
In that instance you would need to reduce the aperture to f/11.0 +, to increase DOF.

Yeah I'd not encountered any trouble on f8 before, at the viewing park at MAN, for example, where you can get quite close. It was earlier last week when I was at Doncaster where the taxiway is VERY close to the fence and the 737 I was shooting was coming at an angle. The rear end of the aircraft turned out to be slightly blurred.

Quoting Sean377 (Reply 6):
I agree about shooting in the lowest ISO that the light permits (I believe the Nikon D70 starts at ISO200. Is this a not a drawback?).

All the Nikon lovers will linch me for saying this, but it would really put me off only being able to go down to ISO 200. I'm sure they still produce reasonable pics though  Wink
Obviously missing something....
 
ChrisH
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Sun Jun 05, 2005 3:41 am

It's actually kind of a relief not having ISO 100, cause ISO 200 is noise-free and I get better speeds = sharper shots. It could be a drawback in other types of photography tho.
what seems to be the officer, problem?
 
flyingzacko
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Sun Jun 05, 2005 8:59 pm

Hi Shaun,

this is my first post on A.net, but I hope I can still be of some help to you. I actually do own an EOS 300D and a couple of weeks ago I bought an 28-300mm lens for it too. With the new lens it was like starting all over again. What you want to do at this time of the year, since there are a lot of hours in the sun, is to shoot at an ISO of 100 or 200 at the most since the higher the ISO, the more grain your picture will have. I either take my shots in the P mode, or in the Av mode. P stands for program where you can select the AF sensors, instead of shooting on the complete automated mode where you can't adjust anything. When shooting in the Av mode on the other hand, you can adjust the aperture settings. Like others have said before you should go with something close to f8.0 since with this kind of aperture you will be able to shoot at good shutter speeds, but your shots will also have good overall sharpness usually. That is what you mainly want to look out for when taking shots, and also the lighting plays a factor, but you might already know which type of light is good for shots and which is not. If you need further advice, do not hesitate to ask.

Cheers,


Sebastian
Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
 
EGFF
Topic Author
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Mon Jun 06, 2005 3:27 am

I'd like to thank everyone that has contributed to this post, it has helped alot and given me a rough idea of the basics.
I wont have a chance to get to the airport till this coming thursday, according to the forcast it's gonna be warm and sunny so AV mode sounds good with ISO 100 and f8.0, it's a start for me so i will try that out and see how i get on.
Just one more thing, i see that there a quite a few quality options, there are 2 options each for Large, Medium and Small and then onviously RAW but i was just wondering what you guys mainly use?
Thanks once again for the feedback,
Shaun
All together or not at all
 
Airplanepics
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Mon Jun 06, 2005 3:32 am

Quoting EGFF (Reply 11):
Just one more thing, i see that there a quite a few quality options, there are 2 options each for Large, Medium and Small and then onviously RAW but i was just wondering what you guys mainly use?

Only use Large (the top one on the menu).

When you feel confident, you could switch over to RAW.....but That's all down to personal preference.
Simon - London-Aviation.com
 
flyingzacko
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Mon Jun 06, 2005 3:56 am

I was trying to quote Airplanepics response, but I didn't know how. Sorry for that, but he's exactly right. I only use Large as well. When you are shooting on RAW however there is no "interpretation" there yet however, like for instance when you shoot on Large it will be a jpeg and for that certain format the information contained by the picture is interpreted with a this (jpeg) algorithm. RAW however is really huge size-wise compared to Large and so long I have been satiesfied with the Large setting.

Sebastian
Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
 
dvmpaunch
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Mon Jun 06, 2005 4:14 am

I have a question. What internal settings do you guys use? ie: saturation colour etc. I think I've mastered the f8.0 factor but I always have to do a lot of photoshop to get the colours just right on the 300D.

Regards
Darryl
 
QantasA332
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Mon Jun 06, 2005 6:36 am

Quoting Dvmpaunch (Reply 14):
What internal settings do you guys use? ie: saturation colour etc.

It's usually best to select the most neutral in-camera parameters, and adjust everything in photoshop (yes, you may always have to do a lot, however DSLRs are designed with post-processing in mind). Again, I'm not a 300D user, however I believe the neutral parameter on the 300D is Parameter 2.

Cheers,
Gabriel
 
jumbojim747
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Mon Jun 06, 2005 6:39 am

Make sure you are in sRGB mode and i personally would prefer to have the white balance on AUTO
On a wing and a prayer
 
flyingzacko
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Mon Jun 06, 2005 6:45 am

Quoting Dvmpaunch (Reply 14):
I have a question. What internal settings do you guys use? ie: saturation colour etc. I think I've mastered the f8.0 factor but I always have to do a lot of photoshop to get the colours just right on the 300D.

I do the same thing though. I usually use photoshop too, if the colors aren't the way I want them to be, but I never change any of the camera settings for that concerning saturation or colour.

Cheers,

Sebastian
Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
 
dc10tim
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Mon Jun 06, 2005 8:33 am

Quoting QantasA332 (Reply 15):
Again, I'm not a 300D user, however I believe the neutral parameter on the 300D is Parameter 2.

This is one of the other quirks of the 300D I have found. 'Parameter1' sets everything to +1, wheras 'Parameter2' puts everything to 0. I always shoot in 'Parameter2' as I found the "in camera" sharpening applied by 'Parameter1' to leave you with too many jaggies on resizing. 'Parameter2' still can do to an extent, but it's not half as bad.

Tim.
Obviously missing something....
 
EGFF
Topic Author
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 7:03 am

I'm taking in everything that everyone is saying, i've had more time now to use the camera, i've been out in the garden trying all kinds of different settings and i think now i know roughly the basics to get some nice shots.
Obviously it will take time as there is so much to learn, as time goes on i'll get better and better, i'm still chuffed to have made the switch to DSLR as i have been using a Sony F707 for the past 3yrs.
If anybody has anymore info or feedback please post, the more feedback i can get the quicker i'll learn.
Regards,
Shaun
All together or not at all
 
Jkw777
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 7:07 am

The key to learning is to practice practice practice.

Keep at it, keep experimenting. If you do need more help, you know there are plenty of people here that can help you.

Good luck,
Justin  Smile
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EGFF
Topic Author
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 7:13 am

Thanks for your kind words and a helping hand Justin, it's very much appreciated ... i just gotta wait now to put it to the test (which isn't gonna be for another week or so, boo hoo)
I suppose the longer i wait the better it's gonna be when i do finally get to the airport and let loose :P
Regards,
Shaun
All together or not at all
 
A388
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 9:08 am

Wow, this type of feedback I was also looking for. Even though I've had my EOS300D for quite some time now, I'm still learning from this forum. Like EGFF has said, thank you very much for the tips. It just happens to be that I will go to the airport tomorrow so I will also take into account the tips I've read here Big grin

Cheers,

A388
 
A388
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 10:14 am

I forgot to ask this, do the f8.0-f11 Av settings also apply for arriving/departing aircraft (in other words fast moving objects) or is it better to use the Tv settings in this case? I did that a few times but the images came out blurry with lower quality.

A388
 
flyingzacko
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 11:39 am

Quoting A388 (Reply 23):
I forgot to ask this, do the f8.0-f11 Av settings also apply for arriving/departing aircraft (in other words fast moving objects) or is it better to use the Tv settings in this case? I did that a few times but the images came out blurry with lower quality.

You rather wanna go for the Av setting there instead of the Tv setting if not even P.

Cheers,
Sebastian
Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
 
JeffM
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 12:16 pm

Quoting A388 (Reply 23):
I forgot to ask this, do the f8.0-f11 Av settings also apply for arriving/departing aircraft (in other words fast moving objects) or is it better to use the Tv settings in this case? I did that a few times but the images came out blurry with lower quality.

You can leave it on AV, open it up some (f stop) to increase your shutter speed, or bump your iso up to 200 if your still having problems with blur. Don't set it on P, you want to control the speed, the camera will most likely set a middle of the road setting that will result in a poor capture.
 
sean377
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 3:41 pm

Quoting A388 (Reply 23):
I forgot to ask this, do the f8.0-f11 Av settings also apply for arriving/departing aircraft (in other words fast moving objects) or is it better to use the Tv settings in this case? I did that a few times but the images came out blurry with lower quality.

It's already been said, but sticking with a default f8 in AV mode will help towards catching the sharpest possible images, as this value tends to be most lenses 'sweet spot'. But it's important that you do keep an eye on the shutter speed that the camera is selecting in the viewfinder in order to ensure it doesn't drop too low. In which case, just scroll the main dial whilst you shoot, trying not to stray too far from f8. f8 in AV mode is a great place to start, but you won't get that image if the shutter speed drops off. If you can't get a decent shutter speed at around f8, you may have to increase the ISO speed.

Sean
Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man... Landing is the first!
 
IwantaBBJ
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 7:30 pm

Re. the shutter speeds: We have talked about getting adequate shutter speeds.... But what is adequate and what not? I remember of hearing a rule of thump that it has to be the same as the focal length (or twice.. or half??) Can anyone help?

Mike
 
Staffan
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 7:50 pm

It depends, the rule of thumb says 1/focal length as the limit to what's hand holdable and what's not. If you have shaky hands you might want to have faster times and with steady hands you might be able to double the times.

Keep in mind that with 1.6x crop cameras such as the 300D you need to take the crop into account, so at 200 mm 1/320th is a good limit.

Staffan
 
flyingzacko
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 8:47 pm

See, that's why I love A.net! There are so many people here that all care about the same stuff and everyone knows some information that the others don't. That rule does really sound good Staffan. The max focal length I can shoot at is 300mm. 300 times 1.6 would make that 480 so yea sounds right to go with something like 1/500th. Great info.

Cheers,
Sebastian
Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
 
JeffM
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 10:21 pm

Quoting Staffan (Reply 28):
Keep in mind that with 1.6x crop cameras such as the 300D you need to take the crop into account, so at 200 mm 1/320th is a good limit.

Staffan, it's not necessary to include the crop factor to the "old rule" since you are not adding any real focal length, just using less of the image. 1/200 in the above example will work just as well. With practice you should be able to drop well below that down into the low 1/100's even while using focal lengths well above 300mm.

Sharp photos are more the result of good technique, not some dial you set on the camera.  Wink
 
flyingzacko
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 10:43 pm

JeffM,
very true what you said about sharp photos being the result of good technique. Do you have experience shooting with focal lengths above 300mm with shutter speeds in the low 1/100's even without IS. If so, what kind of aperture should you use in that case?

Cheers,
Sebastian
Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
 
JeffM
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 10:58 pm

Quoting FlyingZacko (Reply 31):
Do you have experience shooting with focal lengths above 300mm with shutter speeds in the low 1/100's even without IS. If so, what kind of aperture should you use in that case?

Yes, but I've been taking pictures of airplanes since the late 70's. I've got a lot of practice. I can't give you an exact setting...that is the point. Any picture you take can be exposed multiple ways and each one of them can be correct. Lately I've been using a handheld incident meter to figure exposure for me, but I know many don't have one and rely on the camera's reflected light meter. If you set the camera to TV mode, and then raise or lower you shutter speed, you will see the camera setting the f-stop wider or narrower depending on the speed. Same for AV mode, you tell the camera what f-stop you desire, and as you change it, the camera will increase or decrease the speed of the shutter based on what it thinks is correct. There is no "magic" nob or dial setting for great pictures.

Your decision as photographer is to decide what setting to have the camera use. Do you need a fast shutter? Or do you want a certain f-stop? Practice and careful examination of your results, now easy to do thanks to exif data (we used to have to write down what we used after each picture on a small pad..) will help you make the right choice on future outings.
 
Psych
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 11:08 pm

Quoting JeffM (Reply 30):
it's not necessary to include the crop factor to the "old rule" since you are not adding any real focal length,

That's an important point Jeff - there often seems to be a lot of confusion relating to this particular issue.

I think the above 'rule of thumb' is a useful one, though other variables also play their part. I have found from bitter experience that I can take a nice clear shot at 1/125th even close to 300mm, but that is with a stationary subject. Turn that into a landing aircraft and it becomes very tricky (without IS).

I also subscribe to the view that many argue above, that Aperture Priority is the ideal mode in which to shoot. Unless you have a very specific shot in mind - such as a panning photo where you want the background blurred, or a fast shutter to freeze something very fast-moving, like a fast jet at a display - Av focuses the mind on the key variables of image quality and also depth of field (obviously crucial factors if you hope to upload here) You can then add to the equation what the f-stop, the available light and the current ISO setting require in terms of shutter speed. With practice it becomes second nature to juggle all these variables. I would always recommend avoiding program/auto modes, as it just doesn't help you think about the photographic aspects of the shot, and I don't think you can learn much and develop your skills.

As others have said, I think it is important not to stick religiously to your preferred setting - be it shutter speed or aperture. It's how these 2 balance which is key. f8 may produce the best quality optically, but the photo may be awful and blurred if f8 gave a shutter speed of 1/30th. Equally, setting up 1/500th is potentially a problem if it requires such a large aperture that the lens quality goes down significantly and the image is too soft.

Paul
 
Jan Mogren
Posts: 2014
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 11:27 pm

Crop factor should be included. Some of that interesting stuff at the end of this thread RE: Sigma 50-500 Why No OS? (by Staffan May 4 2005 in Aviation Photography)

/JM
AeroPresentation - Airline DVD's filmed in High Definition
 
JeffM
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 11:34 pm

Quoting Psych (Reply 33):
As others have said, I think it is important not to stick religiously to your preferred setting - be it shutter speed or aperture. It's how these 2 balance which is key. f8 may produce the best quality optically, but the photo may be awful and blurred if f8 gave a shutter speed of 1/30th. Equally, setting up 1/500th is potentially a problem if it requires such a large aperture that the lens quality goes down significantly and the image is too soft.

Good points Paul. That is the reason I have switched to using a hand held incident meter. It measures light falling on the entire scene, not just the light reflected off part of the scene. As you know, when you move your camera across a certain field of view, the camera's meter will vary quite a bit. Sometimes it is "seeing" something dark, sometimes it is "seeing" something lighter. Sometimes the surface the meter reads is not dark, but it is not reflecting light much due to it's surface texture. A white cloud will not reflect light the same as a white aircraft surface thus giving the camera two completely different meter readings, both the same color white, both potentially wrong readings. The angle at which the light hits your subject can cause different readings on the camera's meter as well. Dark cluttered backgrounds, or blue sky also factor into causes of bad exposure as the camera is trying make adjustments for them and the subject aircraft.

While not perfect, the incident meter has eliminated a lot of problems with bad exposure for me. Far fewer blown highlights, and under-exposures. Measurement of the available light is almost always better then a measurement of light reflected, if you can measure it from the same angle. I originally purchased it to set ratios for 4 -5 studio lights, but found it is an excellent tool to keep in the bag for outdoor shots like aircraft as well. For less the $300 bucks, it is a good value for me.
 
JeffM
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 11:42 pm

Quoting Jan Mogren (Reply 34):
Crop factor should be included.

I disagree, but if you need to include it, by all means do. Many don't use that "rule of thumb" anyway, but I can see where it might be a helpful guide for some starting out so they will learn to keep their shutter speed up to help prevent shake.

The crop factor does not change focal length period. If I put a vignetting filter on the front of a 50mm lens on a film body, I will effectively crop what ever percent of that image on the film. If I then set the film into the enlarger and make a print of that crop only (which is what our small sensors are, a crop), I have an image that looks like it was taken with a longer lens. Did I? No, I used a 50mm focal length.
 
sean377
Posts: 1128
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2001 1:18 am

RE: Canon 300D Settings

Wed Jun 08, 2005 11:51 pm

Quoting Psych (Reply 33):
...but that is with a stationary subject. Turn that into a landing aircraft and it becomes very tricky (without IS).

I was led to believe that IS was to eliminate hand shake in low light conditions on a still, rather than moving subject, and was not designed for moving objects (although, if it works, great!). Is this true?

Sean
Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man... Landing is the first!
 
JeffM
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 12:00 am

Quoting Sean377 (Reply 37):
and was not designed for moving objects (although, if it works, great!). Is this true?

No, Mode II is is designed for moving objects. It allows movement horizontally and surpresses vertical movement, it does not eliminate it. Mode I surpresses movement on both the vertical and horizontal axis.

IS does not eliminate anything, it just helps a little, you still have to learn to hold the lens still.
 
Jan Mogren
Posts: 2014
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 12:20 am

Jeff,
you are ex military no? You thought of my example with that laser thingy?

/JM
AeroPresentation - Airline DVD's filmed in High Definition
 
sean377
Posts: 1128
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 12:30 am

Quoting JeffM (Reply 38):
Quoting Sean377 (Reply 37):
and was not designed for moving objects (although, if it works, great!). Is this true?

No, Mode II is is designed for moving objects. It allows movement horizontally and surpresses vertical movement, it does not eliminate it. Mode I surpresses movement on both the vertical and horizontal axis.

IS does not eliminate anything, it just helps a little, you still have to learn to hold the lens still.

Ah, I see, is this Mode II specific to certain lenses, or is that now standard on all IS lenses?

Sean
Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man... Landing is the first!
 
JeffM
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RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 1:07 am

Jan, are you talking about this?

Quoting Jan Mogren (Reply 39):
Let's say you have a laser gun. At 100m you try to keep the laser dot inside the target circle. Now try that at 1km. You might encounter some shake!

There would be many variables that could effect this, and the one we are talking about (shutter speed) isn't one of them obviously.

Other then who is holding the "gun", and how well they can do it, there are really only two variables, the length of the gun's sensitive axis, and the size of the circle. The amount of shake on the "gun" is the same at 100m or 1km. You are only able to see it better at 1km. The amount of shake has not changed.

I'm not saying adding the additional crop factor's "speed" to your lense's basic shutter/length calculation won't help some, for me and others, it is just not enough to make a noticable difference to be called a "have to rule" to follow.
 
Jan Mogren
Posts: 2014
Joined: Tue Dec 26, 2000 2:47 am

RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 1:31 am

That is the one Jeff.
Let's not call it a "have to rule".
You agree we will see the shake better at 1km. Should be the same as shooting with a higher crop factor, which is like taking a closer look.

Or like Staffan says; video camera with a 500x digital zoom  Wink

/JM
AeroPresentation - Airline DVD's filmed in High Definition
 
Staffan
Posts: 3879
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 9:21 am

RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 2:02 am

Here we go again  Wink

Quote:
The amount of shake has not changed.

That's right.

Imagine using a 300 mm lens on a full frame. Now imagine shooting the same lens with a 1.6 crop, in which of these cases will the same amount of shake cause the object to move around the most in the viewfinder?

Focal lenght has nothing to do with it, crop has.

Staffan
 
JeffM
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Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 3:32 am

RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 2:10 am

Quoting Staffan (Reply 43):
in which of these cases will the same amount of shake cause the object to move around the most in the viewfinder?

Neither, it is the same. You're just not seeing the rest of the frame. Focal length has everything to do with it. It is pure physics. You are moving that 300mm lens the same amount regardless of what body you put it on, and what part of the frame you look at.
 
Staffan
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Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 9:21 am

RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 2:35 am

Let me rephrase:

Imagine using a 300 mm lens on a full frame. Now imagine shooting the same lens with a 1.6 crop, in which of these cases will the same amount of shake cause the object to move around the most relative to the edges in the viewfinder?
 
JeffM
Posts: 7569
Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 3:32 am

RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 2:42 am

Quoting Staffan (Reply 45):
Let me rephrase:

No, let me.....

Quoting JeffM (Reply 44):
Neither, it is the same. You're just not seeing the rest of the frame. Focal length has everything to do with it. It is pure physics. You are moving that 300mm lens the same amount regardless of what body you put it on, and what part of the frame you look at.

Actual movement is EXACTLY the same, Apparent movement based on looking at a smaller part of that image has no effect.

Done with this. Use what you need.  Wink

-Jeff
 
Staffan
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Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 9:21 am

RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 2:46 am

The main difference between different focal lengths is the crop.

Staffan
 
highguy76
Posts: 174
Joined: Wed Jun 25, 2003 10:38 pm

RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 2:52 am

Has anyone experimented with different White Balance settings?
I usually use AWB, but have had some good results usuing the shade setting, especially on cloudy days (which I get a lot of in SEA).
I'd be interested to know if anyone else has played with these settings.

Highguy76
 
Jan Mogren
Posts: 2014
Joined: Tue Dec 26, 2000 2:47 am

RE: Canon 300D Settings

Thu Jun 09, 2005 3:18 am

Funny thing is that we agree on "Actual movement is EXACTLY the same"
but not the "Apparent movement based on looking at a smaller part of that image has no effect" part.

So why does it shake like hell if you video shoot with a high digital zoom?

/JM
AeroPresentation - Airline DVD's filmed in High Definition

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