PRM
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Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner Info

Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:37 pm

Hi all,

I'm in the process of deciding what to buy in the way of a film scanner to scan my (mainly 1990's consumer quality Kodak Gold and Fuji HG 100-200ASA print film) and encourage all of you with older shots to post examples to help me decide! I've seen some great examples of what can be done with relatively inexpensive flatbed scanners (Gary), but would have the budget to stretch to a more-expensive dedicated film scanner if the results justify the means.....

I've contacted a few individuals for specific details on certain shots (thanks again to you all), and now would especially like to see examples posted shot with regular 100 or 200ASA print film specifying:

- the exact film type and speed if possible;
- details of scanner used and dpi settings;
- editing software used (Photoshop Elements / CS2 / Vuescan / Siverfast etc);
- any other specific editing done (e.g. Neatimage)

With this we can compare the different outputs. Obviously considerations will be made to light, weather conditions and age of the print.

Please post as many as you can, as hopefully the exercise will be informative for others planning to make similar decisions.

Cheers,Paul
 
PRM
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner Info

Fri Sep 15, 2006 9:01 pm

I understand editing methods will vary and have considerable effect on the end result, nevertheless I'll start with some examples (using a Minolta Scan Elite II before it broke down, @ 2820dpi max scanning resolution, 8-bit colour, Minolta scanning software, saved as TIFF , edited in Photoshop Elements 2)


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Photo © Paul Morley
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Photo © Paul Morley


Kodak Gold 200


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Photo © Paul Morley
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Photo © Paul Morley


Fuij HG 200


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Photo © Paul Morley


Jessops 200 (woohoo!)


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Photo © Paul Morley


Fuij Reala 100

Next!
 
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rg828
Posts: 568
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner Info

Sat Sep 16, 2006 2:59 am

Hi Paul,
As of late I've been using an Epson perfection 4490 Photo flatbed scanner:
print reflective scans:


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Photo © Carlos A. Morillo Doria
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Photo © Carlos A. Morillo Doria



negative scans:


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Photo © Carlos A. Morillo Doria
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Photo © Carlos A. Morillo Doria



Ever since I used an Epson 3170 I have become an ardent Epson fan. Their flatbeds have impressive negative scanning capabilities (the 4490 has 6400 dpi uninterpolated capability, 12800 interpolated) and really do the job well, considering their price. Admittedly I struggle with slide scans - somehow they are much more difficult to process since they come out dark after scanning.

Most of my shots were done with Kodak Gold 100, with some exceptions:

Fuji 800 press:
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Photo © Carlos A. Morillo Doria



Fuji 3200(!):
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Photo © Carlos A. Morillo Doria



Kodak PJB multi-ASA film:
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Photo © Carlos A. Morillo Doria
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Photo © Carlos A. Morillo Doria



I've used most color negatives out there: Kodak, Konica, Agfa, Fuji, and almost every ISO possible, but Kodak Gold 100 processes the easiest. Plus, it stood the test of time much better than the others.

What I normally do is import the image using PS CS on a high - but manageable dpi setting, like something between 4000-6400. I scan the 'raw' image, with no adjustments whatsoever (ICE, autocolor, etc.) Workable image is around 8000 pixels wide, 60mb Tiff.

The raw scan usually has some severe color cast on it, so after levelling and cropping I use the levels adjustments options/adjust white or grey points to get the real colors back. Usually after that some auto color will do the final color corrections. I never use Auto color only, usually levels.

After curves and saturations adjustments I use the "despeckle" function to remove some of the graininess. Multiple times, if necessary.

I then separate the areas I want sharpened using the quick mask feature, save the selection, sharpen using Unsharp Mask (500, 0.2), then resize to 1024, bring out the mask selection and sharpen again using a higher setting - usually 175, 0.3-0.4.

I never got used to Neatimage as I find it similar to PS's Smart Blur function.

And thats it! A fellow photog pointed out a new flatbed from Epson, the V750 Pro, with fluid-mount capability - surely something to keep an eye on!

Cheers
I dont know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everyone
 
iRISH251
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner Info

Sat Sep 16, 2006 3:10 am

This is quite a useful past thread if you haven't seen it:
Masterclass: Slide Scanning And Further Processing (by Beechcraft May 21 2006 in Aviation Photography)
 
ghostbase
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner Info

Sat Sep 16, 2006 3:15 am

A few recently scanned and uploaded examples:


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Photo © Michael Baldock
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Photo © Michael Baldock



Both taken 1987 on Kodak CA 100 print film, very pleased with how these have come out.


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Photo © Michael Baldock
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Photo © Michael Baldock



Both taken 1996 on Fuji 100 print film, I think it was Superia, was not happy with these at all. Horrible colour cast.


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Photo © Michael Baldock
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Photo © Michael Baldock



Both taken 1989 and I think these were on Sainsburys supermarket 'own label' cheap film, believed to be manufactured by Fuji. Was 100 ASA. Excellent results considering what the film cost.


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Photo © Michael Baldock



Both taken 1990 on Kodak Gold 100-2 which seems to excel in these poor light situations.

Scanned on an Acer Scanwit 2720S film scanner at 2700 dpi, worked as TIFF files until final save as JPEG, Neat Image grain reduction software, Photoshop LE (equivalent to Elements), dust spot cloning using Micrographx Picture Publisher.

Over 1000 old film shots 1987 to 2000 on A.Net - works for me  

  

Note: I don't think the Acer film scanners exist now, they might have been rebadged though.

2nd Note: Have recently learned to always have a play with the colour using the levels tool, it is amazing how a photo suddenly looks much better after a few experimental dabs!

[Edited 2006-09-15 20:20:16]
"I chase my dreams but I never seem to arrive"
 
lasham
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner Info

Sat Sep 16, 2006 3:17 am

Quoting PRM (Thread starter):
the exact film type and speed if possible;
- details of scanner used and dpi settings;
- editing software used (Photoshop Elements / CS2 / Vuescan / Siverfast etc);
- any other specific editing done (e.g. Neatimage)

Epson 1600SU flatbed with Neg & Pos top. 300 dpi.

Then Photoshop CS. Seems you can give them loads of USM without any problems.

Never use neat Img as just dont like it. Grain ok for old shots.

Good luck and look forward to seeing some

Put a comment to the screeners that its a scan as if they look too good they might think its a digi shot!!

Tony
No sun no fun
 
lasham
Crew
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner Info

Sat Sep 16, 2006 3:20 am

Quoting Ghostbase (Reply 4):
Both taken 1996 on Fuji 100 print film, I think it was Superia, was not happy with these at all. Horrible colour cast.

Hi

Easy to loose that colour in PS. Give it Magenta in and some cyan out.
Might be worth uploading the new colour.

Tony
No sun no fun
 
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rg828
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner I

Sat Sep 16, 2006 4:01 am

Quoting Lasham (Reply 5):
Put a comment to the screeners that its a scan as if they look too good they might think its a digi shot!!

I wish that were true, honestly I think it matters little.  frown 

Quoting Ghostbase (Reply 4):
Fuji 100 print film, I think it was Superia, was not happy with these at all. Horrible colour cast.

I've had great experiences with Superia, I'll try to dig out some examples.
Fuji Reala was fantastic, similar to Gold 100.
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Photo © Carlos A. Morillo Doria


Easy to process with PS as well.
I dont know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everyone
 
IL76
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner Info

Sat Sep 16, 2006 4:42 am

Paul,

You had emailed me already, but I'll write down some more detail here.
I had/have 3 ways of scanning pictures.

1: Flatbed scan of prints. My oldest uploads were scanned with a very low resolution scanner and were 'touched up' using Paint Shop, all at my university. Looking at them now makes me cringe:

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Photo © Eduard Brantjes



I recently started to rescan/reupload my first uploads with a Canoscan FB630Ui and editing in Photoshop.

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Photo © Eduard Brantjes



2: Negative/slidescanner. I have a Primefilm 1800i scanner, which is pretty bad, but I managed to get some shot accepted here up until about 4 years ago. Used for slides and negatives. Edited with Photoshop 5.5.

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Photo © Eduard Brantjes



3: A Canon 10D + 17-40mm lens.   I 'scanned' a few of my prints by taking a picture of them. This was before I got the Canoscan to work. Quite tricky because of the reflections, but the quality is quite good! Edited in Photoshop, the same way as I edit my digital shots.

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Photo © Eduard Brantjes


Cheers,
Eduard

PS, I forgot: All my film/slide shots were taken on either Kodak Gold 100/200, Fuji Superia 100/200 or Fuji Sensia 100 (slides).

[Edited 2006-09-15 21:46:24]
 
PRM
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner Info

Sat Sep 16, 2006 9:07 pm

Hi,

Thanks to Carlos, Tony, Michael, Eduard for the excellent feedback (hope others will come and post their examples too).

Quoting IL76 (Reply 8):
You had emailed me already, but I'll write down some more detail here.

Yep, thanks Eduard. I've been dithering for days over what route to follow on the scanner front, so this more detailed feedback is helping greatly.

Sepcial thanks to Carlos - this feedback is great as your examples equate well to the set-up and materials I'll be working with - both yourself and Gary Watt are getting excellent results with the Epson 4490.

Quoting Irish251 (Reply 3):
This is quite a useful past thread if you haven't seen it:

Masterclass: Slide Scanning And Further Processing (by Beechcraft May 21 2006 in Aviation Photography)

Thanks Irish - I'd looked it up already  Smile

Cheers, Paul
 
dlednicer
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner I

Sun Sep 17, 2006 3:11 am

My Photoshop skills have improved over time, so these are completely representative. I highly recommend using Helicon Filter to reduce noise.

As a side note, I used 400 ASA film to allow me to shoot indoors and outdoors without having to change film. Having the ability to change ISO on my digitial camera sure is nice.

Kodak Ektachrome 400, Nikon Coolscan III:

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Photo © David Lednicer
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Photo © David Lednicer



Fuji Provia 400, Nikon Coolscan III:

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Photo © David Lednicer
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Photo © David Lednicer



Fuji Provia 400, Nikon Coolscan III, Helicon Filter:

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Photo © David Lednicer
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Photo © David Lednicer

 
timdegroot
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner Info

Sun Sep 17, 2006 3:16 am

Scanned on a Nikon Coolscan IV, from some generic brand of film I think. No noise reduction or similar things used.


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Photo © Tim de Groot - AirTeamImages




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Photo © Tim de Groot - AirTeamImages




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Photo © Tim de Groot - AirTeamImages



Tim
Alderman Exit
 
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rg828
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RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner I

Sun Sep 17, 2006 3:43 am

Quoting PRM (Reply 9):
Sepcial thanks to Carlos - this feedback is great as your examples equate well to the set-up and materials I'll be working with - both yourself and Gary Watt are getting excellent results with the Epson 4490.

No problem Paul, glad to help! The Epson flatbeds are indeed very impressive. My first scanner was a Minolta Scan dual II and I never really got used to it - slow, somewhat complicated interface, and the graininess really popped out. The 3170 was so much friendlier, and gave fantastic results, considering it was a flatbed and their associated negative film scanning reputation (back then at least.)

Interesting to note than there are now fewer dedicated film scanners in the market nowadays. On B&H only Microtek, Nikon and Pacific Image have them, a third of whats available in the flatbed section.

Cheers
I dont know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everyone
 
PRM
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Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2002 12:17 am

RE: Post Your Negative Scans With Film / Scanner Info

Mon Sep 18, 2006 5:04 pm

Quoting RG828 (Reply 12):
My first scanner was a Minolta Scan dual II and I never really got used to it - slow, somewhat complicated interface, and the graininess really popped out.

And this was exactly my experience with the Minolta Scan Elite II (esp. the graininess, even when running the Digital ICE and GEM which invoked horrible scan times...

Thanks to Tim and David for further posts, and to all earlier posters plus those I contacted personally - I think I'll be heading down the Epson Flatbed route.

Cheers,
Paul

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