evall95
Topic Author
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Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Tue Sep 20, 2011 7:02 am

I am looking at buying the nikon d3000 and I was just wondering what the best lens is to take aviation photos.
 
EGCC777LR
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RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Tue Sep 20, 2011 8:03 am

Depends on the money you are looking to invest. The Nikon AF-S 70-300mm VR served me well and there will be a number on the used market now for sensible money. Glass is a better investment than an expensive body if you only have limited funds, it is a better long term investment as lenses do not depreciate like bodies.

A good friend of mine has nearly 600 shots here on A.net with the Sigma 50-500mm. I have to say it is hard to beat for versatility and will stop you having to wory about getting dust on your sensor    as you wont have to change it over with that lens, but it is a lot more expensive.

On the up side, on a DX sensor that would give you 75-750mm  Wow! You could read the Pilot's ID badge with that......
Flown On B704,722,732/3/4/7/8/9,744,752,762/3/4,772,77W,A319,A320,A321,A330,A388,L1011,F-50,BAE146,CRJ100, Dash-8. Left
 
evall95
Topic Author
Posts: 306
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RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Tue Sep 20, 2011 8:18 am

Is the 55-200 mm good. I am just looking at a body and lens for under 500 or the 18-55
 
viv
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RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:55 am

Quoting EGCC777LR (Reply 1):
on a DX sensor that would give you 75-750mm

It would not. You cannot change the focal length of a lens by putting it on a different camera. What the smaller sensor does is give you a cropped version of the shot you would get with the larger sensor.
Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
 
NWA330nut
Posts: 62
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2009 12:52 am

RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Tue Sep 20, 2011 12:03 pm

Quoting viv (Reply 3):

Ummm..... Yes it does. While EGCC777LR does not mention "equivalent" focal length, what he said is very true.

Quoting viv (Reply 3):
What the smaller sensor does is give you a cropped version of the shot you would get with the larger sensor

I think you contradicted yourself there.

Isn't that essentially magnifying what you are seeing? Same reason why many nature photographers might use a DX system.

Quoting evall95 (Reply 2):
Is the 55-200 mm good. I am just looking at a body and lens for under 500 or the 18-55
Quoting EGCC777LR (Reply 1):
The Nikon AF-S 70-300mm VR

Again, EGCC777LR is right on. That would be a great lens to get, I will be getting one within the next few weeks. Much better than the 55-200 I was stuck with for years. Glass first.
 
viv
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RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Tue Sep 20, 2011 12:16 pm

Quoting NWA330nut (Reply 4):
Isn't that essentially magnifying what you are seeing?

No it is not. each part of the image will be the same size and show the same level of detail.

For a detailed explanation, go here:

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/crop-factor.htm

[Edited 2011-09-20 05:18:53]
Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
 
NWA330nut
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RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Tue Sep 20, 2011 12:36 pm

So you are saying that if pictures a FX and DX sensor such as a D700 and D90 or D40 were compared, there wouldn't be any difference? They have about the same number of MP, if that even makes a difference.

Still, I cannot agree with what you are saying. Your link seemed to solidify my stance, but now I am just getting confused trying to understand what you are saying.

Quoting viv (Reply 5):
No it is not. each part of the image will be the same size and show the same level of detail.

Still, I cannot derive this from Rockwell's page. That is the same page I learned to understand it years ago.

Cheers.
 
viv
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RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Tue Sep 20, 2011 2:01 pm

Let me try again. A lens has a specific focal length, let us say 200mm.

On a Fx camera, it will give an image of a subject. On a Dx camera, it will show the same subject at the same size, but in a smaller frame, with less space around it, i.e. cropped. This is why it is called "crop factor".

If you cropped the Fx image in Photoshop you would the same result as with the Dx camera.

Many people misunderstand this. They believe that, because a lens will fill the frame with a specific subject on a Dx camera and will not fill it with the same subject on a Fx camera, that somehow the lens on a Dx camera is more "powerful". In reality, the only thing that changes is the area enclosed by the frame.

That is my final word on this. I have tried several times, unsuccessfully, to explain it in this forum. People persist in the belief that a smaller sensor will give them more "reach", because it is "easier to fill the frame". But the frame is SMALLER.

[Edited 2011-09-20 07:02:57]
Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
 
Ychocky
Posts: 128
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RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Tue Sep 20, 2011 2:02 pm

I roll D3000 and the 70-300 VR.

It can be soft at as you head towards 300 but razor sharp at 250.

For the price it's a good combo.
 
TristarAtLCA
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RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Tue Sep 20, 2011 3:11 pm

To the OP,

Just as many have said, buy the best you can afford and don't overlook the used market. Some lenses are built like tanks and most respectable retailers will give a limited guarentee i.e a 3 month warranty or such like on some used items.

Quoting viv (Reply 7):
Many people misunderstand this.

And I was one of the many until last year when a wedding photographer explained the error of my thinking.

The crop factor is the reduction of the field of view you get from a lens when used on a crop sensor camera as opposed to a full frame camera. The error so many people make (like I did) was that the crop rate had somehow become interpreted as a magnification factor when of course, if you think about it logically, it is nothing of the sort. How does a 70-200 on a D700 suddenly become a 105-300 on D7000? The simple answer is it doesn't!

I think people get confused (because I sure did) when they read a lens review and the review says something along the lines of 'the 24-105mm (DX equivalent 36-158mm)' they read that to mean the focal length magically increases on a DX body when they are actually referring to the field of view equivalent the lens returns to the sensor. The images on the Ken Rockwell link above clearly show this narrower view. Just see how much less is in the images of the crop bodies as opposed to the full frame despite being taken with the same lens in the same position.

[Edited 2011-09-20 08:30:06]
If you was right..................I'd agree with you
 
viv
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RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Tue Sep 20, 2011 5:11 pm

Tristar, thank you!

You have explained it properly, better than I did.
Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
 
scopedude
Posts: 56
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RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Wed Sep 21, 2011 1:50 am

to the OP: take a look at Tamron 70-300 VC USD. It's very sharp to 240mm, and quite sharp up to 300mm with good contrast. AF is nearly silent although not as fast as AF-S. I have many photos taken through this lens on D7000.

about FX/DX; the bottom line is focal length doesn't change (a 200mm is a 200mm), only the FOV is changed due to sensor coverage area  
5DSR, 6D, X-T1, 70-200 IS II, 70-300 L, 18-55, 55-200
 
darreno1
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RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Wed Sep 21, 2011 1:56 am

Quoting scopedude (Reply 11):
to the OP: take a look at Tamron 70-300 VC USD. It's very sharp to 240mm, and quite sharp up to 300mm with good contrast. AF is nearly silent although not as fast as AF-S. I have many photos taken through this lens on D7000.

  


I'll echo this. The Tamron 70-300 vc usd is an excellent bargain considering the image quality. It sits on my d7000 the most.
Nikon D7000 / Nikkor 105mm AF f2.8 / Nikkor 35 f1.8G / Nikkor 50 f1.8D / Nikkor 85mm / Nikkor 300mm f4 AF
 
jforbes
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2011 8:03 am

RE: Best Lens For Nikon D3000

Wed Sep 21, 2011 5:08 am

There is some misunderstanding in here, I'll see if I can clear the last bit of doubt from everyone. I'm going to use FX/DX to describe the formats in shorthand. FX is a 35mm sensor, DX is an APS-C sized sensor with, in the case of Nikon, a 1.5x crop factor.

People often note the "equivalent" focal length of a lens in 35mm terms - put a 50mm lens on a DX camera and it will have a field of view equivalent to an 80mm lens on an FX camera. But it is still a 50mm lens. It will have more depth of field than an 80mm lens on the FX camera would.

If the pixel density on the two sensors is the same, then the DX camera image will literally be the exact same thing as a crop from the full frame camera. So if you had two cameras with the same pixel density, and the same lens, but one camera had an FX sensor and the other had a DX sensor, the latter will simply be a crop of the former in appearance. In every way.

In reality, however, FX cameras tend to have less dense sensors. In the case of the Nikon D700, this is a particularly strong case. At only 12 megapixels, it is much less dense than Nikon's current 14MP lineup of DX cameras.

So if you were to take the same lens and put it on the 12MP D700 and a 14MP D7000, the D7000 image would at small magnifications appear to be the same thing as the cropped D700 image, but due to the much higher pixel density of the D7000, the image on the D7000 would have a lot more detail than the crop from the D700 image.

But if you were to compare the D700 to the D40, the images would be roughly the same (barring noise due to the sensors being much different).

So if you're in an area where you need as much telephoto as possible, having higher pixel density on an FX sensor will give more detail than having lower pixel density on a crop sensor with the same lens - you'd still need to crop the image from an FX sensor to match the DX sensor's image appearance. The DX sensor would not be more magnified than the FX sensor in this case. It would just be a lower resolution, smaller crop of what the FX sensor is doing.

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