kenanc
Posts: 183
Joined: Fri Aug 23, 2013 3:36 am

Camera Recommendations

Sun Dec 15, 2013 2:31 am

Hey, I know this gets asked a lot, but I am wondering what is a good dSLR for spotting but also can be used for nature photos, including closeups. My price range is 2 to 3k for everything (body, lens, everything). I want to know your recommendations. I am looking into Nikon and Canon. I am new to this, so if everyone can explain the basics of everything, that would be great. Thanks in advance!
 
len90
Posts: 929
Joined: Thu Jul 06, 2006 1:03 pm

RE: Camera Recommendations

Sun Dec 15, 2013 5:04 am

The ultimate decision for Canon/Nikon is up to you. Both have mostly the same features, but may call things slightly different. I personally am a huge Canon person. The 70-200 f4L IS or 100-400 f4.5-5.6L IS are phenomenal lenses.

For a body you do have to decide if you want a full frame or crop. The crop sensors are cheaper and will have a crop factor of 1.4-1.6x. That will cause your lenses to appear to have more reach since you multiply everything by that crop factor. My best suggestion is to head to a local camera shop and really test out a few different Nikon and Canon bodies with some lenses. See what you like better because odds are you will stick to that brand. I do think one of the Canon bodies you should look at is the 70D. I really think it is a nice body for beginners to grow with.

When you say basics, how familiar are you with photography?
Len90
 
kenanc
Posts: 183
Joined: Fri Aug 23, 2013 3:36 am

RE: Camera Recommendations

Sun Dec 15, 2013 7:43 am

Quoting len90 (Reply 1):
When you say basics, how familiar are you with photography?

I probably have more knowledge than a normal person, but really not nearly as much as a real photographer which is why I am planning on taking a few lessons.
 
len90
Posts: 929
Joined: Thu Jul 06, 2006 1:03 pm

RE: Camera Recommendations

Sun Dec 15, 2013 2:52 pm

So I guess you are familiar with aperture settings, shutter speeds, ISO etc. For airplanes you usually want to try shooting (especially as a beginner) on sunny days with the sun somewhere behind you. Airplanes I always shoot in AV (aperture priority) with my aperture set at 7.1 and ISO at 100 or 125. This allows me to maintain a shutter speed of either 1/800 or 1/1000. You want to photograph airplanes using a fast shutter to prevent motion blur. Once you get the hang of shooting in sunny skies, you can venture off to other weather conditions like cloudy days and all. For those you would have to open up your aperture more (lower number for the f value) and bump up your ISO a bit to maintain that shutter speed. You also may have to play with your exposure and metering to get the plane looking right. That is all more advanced stuff you will come to understand as you gain experience photographing.

I definitely think playing around at a camera shop is going to be your best bet. You want to find an SLR body that feels comfortable. Classes definitely are a good idea. With that said, I never took any photography lessons. I just played around with my cameras and read up on my own about things when I wanted to enhance my ability.
Len90

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: NSMike and 3 guests