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Acey
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Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 2:06 pm

Post screening: positioning in the frame

Wed Feb 28, 2018 11:27 pm

Just trying to understand how a side-on picture should be positioned in the frame. It appears a.net adds the information bar at the bottom and does not superimpose it, therefore I have correctly aligned these two images, taken minutes apart. Cargojet was accepted, American Eagle is low in frame. The Embraer is a bit squarer crop and zoomed in a bit more but its tail and gear lie equally above and below the same features on the Cargojet within the frame. What are we trying to center in the frame? The whole aircraft? The fuselage? Somewhere in between? I'm looking for some insight, because obviously neither is low in frame by any objective measure.

I am fine to accept poor lighting as an issue with both shots, and the fact that both are low in frame if the fuselage is that to be centered.


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If a man hasn't discovered something that he will die for, he isn't fit to live. -- Martin Luther King, Jr.
 
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Kaphias
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Joined: Sat Nov 13, 2010 6:29 am

Re: Post screening: positioning in the frame

Thu Mar 01, 2018 5:42 am

Both look slightly low in frame to me, though the EMB more so probably because of the darker fuselage. Here's what I wrote earlier this week in a different topic on the subject of vertical centering:
Kaphias wrote:
There's really no easy rule to use for vertical centering. The best way I can describe my process is that I want to find the visual center line as if your image was weighted and you were trying to balance the top against the bottom. The fuselage holds a lot of "weight" because of it's area and width, but the tail offsets this somewhat because of it's height. However, because the tail doesn't take up as much area as the fuselage, it doesn't completely offset the "weight" of the fuselage. So in the case of your 737 photo, I wouldn't center between the top of the tail and the bottom of the fuselage... I'd think about halfway up the tail, perhaps. I also take into account the colors (light vs. dark), textures, and importance/prominence of various things in the entirety of my photo... but it's an intuitive process for me. You'll develop your own system and an eye for what the screeners here are looking for over time.
Matthew
 
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airkas1
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Re: Post screening: positioning in the frame

Thu Mar 01, 2018 6:13 am

Both look a bit low in frame for me as well. Kaphias has worded it quite well. It's not an exact science, but it has to look right. Perhaps I can illustrate it with a reent example of my own:



> drew the crop in 16:9.
> centered the fuselage as a base crop
> moved the crop down just a little, to account for the tail.
Result: the distance between the top of the tail and the top of the frame is a little shorter than the distance between the main gear and the bottom of the frame. This is how I usually work out the centering in side-on photos.

And it will work the other way around as well; center the fuselage and then move the crop up a little.
 
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Acey
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Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 2:06 pm

Re: Post screening: positioning in the frame

Thu Mar 01, 2018 6:45 am

It has to look "right". Definitely clears it up.
If a man hasn't discovered something that he will die for, he isn't fit to live. -- Martin Luther King, Jr.
 
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Kaphias
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Joined: Sat Nov 13, 2010 6:29 am

Re: Post screening: positioning in the frame

Thu Mar 01, 2018 7:43 am

Acey wrote:
It has to look "right". Definitely clears it up.

As with pretty much all qualities that photos here are judged on, centering is subjective and there is no logical, replicable system that can be applied to a photo to make it match what the person screening your photo is looking for. As I said in my last post, over time you'll develop an eye for it. Centering is something that I feel I have a good perception of and I'm not sure I've ever received a centering rejection. Softness, on the other hand, drives me nuts because I can't see the difference between soft and oversharp well enough to consistently edit photos to be accepted here. Hence I rarely upload anymore as it's not worth my time to get constant rejections I can't understand or fix.

I like your photos. Keep with it, I understand the lack of a systematic way to center photos is frustrating but you'll get better with time.
Matthew

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