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jsnww81
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The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 6:34 am

I just scanned in a whole bunch of airport terminal maps from the 1960s, 1970s and early 1980s. It's interesting to look at some of these terminals and see how things have changed. Here's the rundown, starting in 1964:

Los Angeles, 1964
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/LAXmap1964.jpg
Here's LAX in the days before all the satellite terminals were connected to the ticketing buildings. The landside terminals were all on one level, as was the terminal roadway. LAX's big dogs in those days were United, TWA, Western and American, each of whom had (essentially) its own terminal. Terminal 1 shows up on the map as a "future" terminal, although it wouldn't be built until 1984... and then in a much different form.

San Diego, 1964
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/SANmap1964.jpg
Just down the coast, here's a much sleepier SAN. The terminal was still in the northeast corner of the field, next to the now-demolished Convair factory. Western, United, American and PSA are in the original building, while newer entrants like Delta, National, Bonanza and Pacific are in an ad-hoc extension. Today's Terminal 1 shows up as "proposed terminal building" on the south side of the airport.

Portland, 1964
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/PDXmap1964.jpg
Portland's 1958-vintage terminal building is seen here just a few years after it opened. Today, the ticket lobby has been converted to a shopping area (a much larger ticket lobby was built in front of the terminal in the late 1970s.) PDX had an interesting cast of characters then - Pan Am with flights to Hawaii, Pacific Northern to Alaska, and locals Pacific and West Coast flying up and down the coast.

Salt Lake City, 1964
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/SLCmap1964.jpg
Today we call it Terminal 1, but back then it was the only building at SLC. United and Western are the major players, but locals Frontier, Bonanza and West Coast are in there too. American and Texas International would join the lineup around 1970, but real growth wouldn't come until after Deregulation, when Western turned SLC into its main hub.

Fort Worth, 1964
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/GSWmap1964.jpg
There was no DFW back then - Fort Worth had its own airport, the ill-fated Greater Southwest International. Despite a decent showing from the major carriers (including hometown carrier Central Air Lines), GSW was a ghost town by the mid-1960s - most airlines had only two or three flights a day. Things were much busier just a few miles away...

Dallas, 1964
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/DALmap1964.jpg
Despite having almost no room to expand, Love Field was the undisputed king of North Texas airports. Here's the 1958 terminal, which is already getting crowded; a massive expansion program in 1968-1970 would ease the strain for just a few years before flights moved to the new DFW Airport.

Jacksonville, 1964
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/JAXmap1964.jpg
Today's Jacksonville International Airport was just breaking ground in 1964 - this is Imeson Field, its too-small and too-busy predecessor. Eastern, National and Delta have counters in the original 1940s terminal, while United and Southern are in the newer extension behind, near the open-air concourses.

Louisville, 1964
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/SDFmap1964.jpg
The place is the same - Standiford Field - but this is the old terminal, which was torn down in 1986 when today's facility opened. Delta is in a newer extension to the east, but everyone else shares the two concourses of the 1950 Lee Terminal Building.

St. Louis, 1964
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/STLmap1964.jpg
Lambert in 1964 doesn't look much different from Lambert in 2005. This is the same terminal, although its vaulted arches were much newer back in 1964. TWA and Ozark were STL's biggest carriers in those days, although American, Eastern and Delta had respectable operations in STL as well. The concourses were double-decked in the late 1970s to allow jetway loading, Concourse D was built in 1985 and the East Terminal in 1997 - but otherwise STL hasn't changed much.

Detroit, 1964
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/DTWmap1964.jpg
DTW was a relatively new airport in 1964 - here's the main terminal, which we know today as the L.C. Smith South Terminal. But there are only two concourses, and only about half of Detroit's airlines are accounted for. So where's everybody else?

Detroit Willow Run, 1964
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/YIPmap1964.jpg
Here's the rest of the group - United, Eastern, TWA, North Central, Mohawk and Lake Central are still over at Willow Run, the Detroit airport that served airlines until DTW was first opened in the mid-1950s. Willow Run's terminal was a large postwar hangar converted to handle passengers. In 1966, when the North Terminal and four more concourses opened at DTW, Willow Run lost all its scheduled service.

Houston, 1968
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/HOUmap1968.jpg
With the opening of Intercontinental Airport just a year away, in 1968 Houston's airlines were still sandwiched into the old Houston International Airport, which had just been renamed Hobby Airport. This terminal is still in service today, although it's finally undergoing a long-overdue expansion and renovation.

Newark, 1968
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/EWRmap1968.jpg
In 1968 Newark was still operating out of the old North Terminal, a boxy building with two narrow ground-level concourses. The "big four" US airlines - United, Eastern, American and TWA - had the most service, although Mohawk and Allegheny were big operators too. The present-day terminal complex was under construction to the south; when it opened in 1973, this terminal was relegated to charter flights. People Express used the facility from 1981 to 1987; it was razed in the late 1990s.

Boston, 1968
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/BOSmap1968.jpg
Doesn't look like Logan has come too far in 40 years - this map of BOS looks remarkably like today's airport! Eastern, American and hometown airline Northeast are the big dogs, with TWA, United and Allegheny in second place.

The terminal, opened in the late 1940s, is a chain of connected modules (one for each airline) augmented by piers added in the 1950s. Piers D and E were demolished in the early 1970s to make room for today's Terminal B. Also missing from the map are Terminal E (built in 1974) and Terminal A (built in 1969 for Eastern, then torn down and rebuilt for Delta this year.)

Seattle/Tacoma, 1968
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/SEAmap1968.jpg
It may look like today's terminal, but this is actually the original SEA terminal that opened with the airport in 1948. Today's Concourses A through D have been added on all sides, but the main building is far too small to handle the crowds. Conspicously absent from the airline lineup is West Coast/Hughes Airwest, which used Boeing Field (BFI) until the early 1970s. Still ahead for SEA: a massive reconstruction, completed in 1973, that built today's terminal around this one and added the North and South Satellites.

Tampa, 1971
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/TPAmap1971.jpg
It's "America's Favorite Airport" today, but in 1971 it was America's newest. This is Tampa's current terminal just a few months after it opened. Airsides B, C, D and E were the original four - today only D is left, and it's slated for demolition and replacement in the next few years.

Kansas City, 1971
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/kansascitymap1971a.jpg
Here's Kansas City Municipal in its final year as the city's major airport - MCI would open the following year. TWA and Braniff dominate the activity, but Continental, Delta and Frontier have decent-sized stations here as well. All boarding is via airstairs - MKC's terminal was an early-1960s masterpiece, with long, narrow concourses and a vast central rotunda.

Honolulu, 1971
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/HNLmap1971.jpg
HNL doesn't look too different from today's airport in this map, although today the Diamond Head and Ewa Concourses are connected to a vastly expanded main terminal. The baggage claim buildings on the east side were torn down in 1985 to make way for a new ticket lobby extension; the interisland terminal was replaced in 1993-1994.

Pittsburgh, 1971
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/PITmap1971a.jpg
In 1971, the 19-year-old Greater Pitt terminal was getting ready for major expansion; the number of gates would almost double when the project was finished in 1973. In the meantime space was at a premium; Allegheny and Eastern have moved into a temporary concourse. Hometown carrier Allegheny was PIT's biggest operator in those days, although United and TWA were quite big too. This terminal is long gone now - it closed in 1992.

Montreal, 1972
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/YULmap1972.jpg
Here's YUL in 1972, three years before the costly and foolish transfer of international flights to Mirabel took place. Montreal was then Canada's official transatlantic gateway; Toronto received only a few token services. Transborder flights from Eastern, Allegheny and Delta (which had just absorbed Northeast) and domestic services from Air Canada, CP Air, Nordair, Eastern Provincial and Quebecair round out the mix.

Denver, 1972
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/DENmap1972.jpg
Denver's Stapleton could still boast a relatively new terminal (it opened in 1966) in 1972. DEN's big players were Frontier, United and Continental, each of whom dominated a concourse; TWA and Western brought up the rear with some long-haul flights as well. Just to the left of the diagram, DEN was preparing to open the huge new Concourse D, which opened later in 1972 for Frontier, TWA, Ozark, North Central and Texas International.

Las Vegas, 1972
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/LASmap1972.jpg
In 1972 McCarran was in the midst of its first major expansion since the terminal opened in 1962. The north concourse (today's A Gates) is closed for reconstruction - note today's familiar dual-rotunda layout nearing completion. TWA, Western and United carried the lion's share of McCarran's traffic, although LAS was also the busiest station in the entire Hughes Airwest network. An enormous expansion in 1985 would change the entire terminal layout.

New Orleans, 1973
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/MSY1973map.jpg
The more things change, the more they stay the same... Concourses A and B are missing (they opened in 1974) but otherwise this is today's MSY terminal. National, Continental, Texas International, Southern and United would move the next year into a massive new terminal addition on the east side of the complex.

Minneapolis/St. Paul, 1975
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/MSPmap1975.jpg
Not surprisingly, Northwest (then called Northwest Orient) dominates the scene at MSP, but local-service carrier North Central is a close second. MSP was the easternmost point on Western Airlines' map, and WA had a good-sized operation there with several DC10s a day. The terminal looks more or less the same as today, although almost every concourse has been extended (and the color designators have been dropped in favor of letters.)

Cleveland, 1975
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/CLEmap1975.jpg
Hopkins Airport looks much the same, although the cast of airlines has changed a lot; Continental doesn't even feature on the map. United was #1 at Cleveland through the 1970s, sharing a concourse with #2 Northwest Orient. The North and West Concourses still featured outdoor boaring via airstairs. A huge reconstruction project in the late 1970s doubled the size of the terminal - the ticket counters moved upstairs to a new lobby, while the lower level became a baggage claim area.

Atlanta, 1975
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/atlmap1975.jpg
Where are the parallel concourses and acres of Delta gates? This is Hartsfield's old terminal, which closed in 1980 when the current terminal opened. Delta and Eastern are the major players, each with two concourses, but Southern and United have sizeable presences as well.

Fort Lauderdale, 1975
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/FLLmap1975.jpg
Today it's one of America's fastest-growing airports, but in 1975 FLL was playing a distant second to the much busier MIA down the coast. Eastern, National and Delta are the big dogs, with service to New York City. The terminal is a patched-together series of open-air buildings; it would finally be replaced by the current complex (built on the same site) in the mid-1980s.

Orlando, 1975
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/orlandomap1975.jpg
Walt Disney World was only a few years old in 1975, and MCO flights were still being handled out of a surplus military hangar with a few cinderblock concourses tacked on. Eastern, Delta, National and Southern were the only carriers permitted to serve Orlando, although service would explode after Deregulation, leading to the construction of today's terminal.

San Francisco, 1975
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/SFOmap1975.jpg
SFO's Central Terminal was still serving domestic flights in 1975; it was home to United, who wouldn't move to the new North Terminal until 1979. International flights used the South Terminal, which was also home to local powerhouses TWA and Western. SFO was Pan Am's main jumping-off point for its Asian network, with 747s departing daily for Honolulu, Tokyo and points beyond.

Phoenix, 1975
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/PHXmap1975.jpg
In the mid-1970s PHX was still running out of two terminals - the now-demolished T1 and today's T2. TWA and American ran the show at PHX in those days; Western, Hughes Airwest and Continental were up-and-comers; and Frontier and Delta brought up the rear, with just a few flights per day. Nary a "Southwest" or "America West" to be seen on the map...

Baltimore, 1975
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/BALmap1975.jpg
Is this really today's BWI? Back then it was known as BAL, and it was a seriously underutilized place bleeding red ink all over the state of Maryland's balance sheet. Despite a respectable amount of service from the majors (United and Eastern had dozens of flights) most flights went out half-empty, as area residents preferred Washington National. A massive reconstruction project, kicked off in 1975, resulted in an almost entirely new terminal - and a rosier future for the airport.

Washington National, 1975
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/DCAmap1975.jpg
The current terminal was just a twinkle in Cesar Pelli's eye when this map was made; in 1975 DCA was operating from the almost comically overcrowded 1941-era terminal (now known as Terminal A.) It was a labyrinth of hidden ticket counters, snaking passageways and ground-level jetbridges; some carriers used the tiny North Terminal (built in 1958) while TWA and American had added new wings in the late 1960s.

San Juan, 1979
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/SJUmap1979.jpg
Puerto Rico's main gateway in 1979, just after Deregulation. Eastern, Pan Am, American and Delta are still the only US trunk carriers in the lineup, but a surprising number of Central and South American carriers are in evidence. Eastern would build its own terminal south of this one in the mid-1980s; American now uses this entire building for its successful SJU hub operation.

San Antonio, 1984
http://oldterminals.topcities.com/SATmap1984.jpg
Here's SAT in 1984, just before the much larger Terminal 1 opened to relieve crowded conditions in the 1950s-vintage Terminal 2. United, USAir and Delta have taken over Braniff's former gates in the rotunda; Eastern and Southwest use ground-level gates off the main concourse; Continental and Ozark use a separate pier built in the 1960s. After Southwest, Delta, United, Mexicana and Eastern moved to the new terminal, Gates 5-12 were demolished.

That's all folks - you have my respect if you've made it this far. I love looking at these old maps - your comments please!
 
ANCFlyer
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 7:03 am

Very cool. I like looking at them as well.

I remember DCA, LAX, SEA and HNL in there old layouts. ANC (obviously) and others. The old ORD too.

Thanks . . .
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jsnww81
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 7:09 am

Thanks for the compliment. I got all these diagrams from old copies of the Official Airline Guide. Unfortunately they only printed diagrams of the 20 or 25 busiest airports in the US. So there was no diagram of ANC - I wish I had one to put up!

I wish I could have seen the old SEA. That place must have been tiny before they expanded it.
 
DCA-ROCguy
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 7:50 am

Dear James,

Good Heavens...I can hardly wait to look at all of these! I have a lot of papers to grade this time of year, so I'll have to have patience and take a few days.  Smile

I did look at the LAX one, though. I flew through LAX in December 1978/ January 79 when the terminal complex was still essentially the layout pictured in the 1964 map. The air service mix and airline locations were also pretty close to what the 1964 map shows. The roster of international carriers had grown by then. But deregulation had just happened, so the domestic mix hadn't started to change drastically yet. I remember seeing an Avianca 747 and an Air New Zealand DC-10.

It's interesting that the 1964 map doesn't show BOAC there yet. You'd think they'd be the first European carrier to land at a USA airport.

As always, keep up the good work!

Jim
Need a new airline paint scheme? Better call Saul! (Bass that is)
 
ANCFlyer
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 8:15 am

Quoting Jsnww81 (Reply 2):
So there was no diagram of ANC - I wish I had one to put up!

No problem . . . . ANC in the 1960s consisted of what used to be the old "C" terminal, now bulldozed and completely rebuilt as the newest terminal at ANC and host to AS. Back then ANC had an airport without jetways, and the population consisted of 40K people, 18 moose, 4 caribou a couple sled dogs and an occasional chicken and goat   . Not surprised it doesn't show up anywhere.

In the mid 1960s the terminal in the town I grew up in - Skagway, AK (SGY) had a small enclosure resembling one of today's bus stops and a pair of old theater seats sitting on the gravel on the east side, midfield of the 3000ft gravel strip. We got AS DHC-6 Twin Otters and AS (AS, yup, AS) Consolidated PBY Catalinas outfitted for pax. best place to sit was in the bubble.   

I saw my first 747 at the old SEA. It was a Northwest Orient 747 arriving from somewhere.

I can recall arriving from Germany when I was stationed there into the old ORD International terminal, where UAs terminal stands today.

[Edited 2005-05-01 01:17:31]
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jsnww81
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 8:29 am

Jim -

I think LAX actually had service from British Caledonian before they had service from BOAC or British Airways (but I could be wrong). If memory serves, BOAC routed their transpacific route through Honolulu, Acapulco and Mexico City, then on to Kingston/Nassau/Bermuda/London. I have seen photos of B-Cal 707s at LAX in the early 1970s. I'm not sure when British Airways entered the mix. For most of the 1970s and 1980s there were strict rules about which markets could be served by BA and which by B-Cal.

I was happy to find some of the more obscure maps, like Jacksonville's Imeson Field and the old terminal at SAN.
 
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jsnww81
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 8:33 am

ANCFlyer:

Thanks for your memories. I do have a fold-out map and guide of ANC that was probably published in the mid-1970s. By that point the terminal had been extended to include Concourse B and the curved main building. There was no North Terminal - international arrivals went through a little FIS hall on the ground floor of the Concourse B rotunda. Pretty interesting.

I never got to see the old International Terminal 1 at ORD. I do have a diagram of ORD that I haven't gotten around to scanning yet. It shows all the ticket counters lined up along the main hallway, leading to the Y-shaped concourse.
 
kimmykun
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 9:14 am

SJU looks so alien to me compared to today. I would've never known it even was a map of SJU if its name wasn't on it.

So you're the webmaster of the Old Terminals site, I presume. It's such an awesome, nostalgic site. It's one of my favorites, really.
 
727LOVER
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 9:43 am

Very cool James, very cool.
Wonder why TPA says National EXECUTIVE Airlines?
SWA TPA was asking about the TPA counters a few weeks back. She'll luv this!!


VERY COOL.
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DCA-ROCguy
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 9:54 am

Ok, I peeked at BAL too.  

Baltimore's layout and gate assignments changed remarkably little in the new late '70s terminal, and held good until the late 1990's. When I arrived in the DC area in 1996, the 1975 A/ 1996D concourse had TWA, right in the same spot, though AA had moved to former AL/PI gates in 1975B/1996C. NW used gates on the '90s extension that was built to 75B/96C, as did Southwest when they entered BWI in 1993.

United and Delta were still in 1975C/1996B concourse in 1996, though UA mostly used the little stub A that was added with the late '70s rebuilding. Piedmont remained in 1975B/ 1996C until PI made its hub at BWI in the early '80s, when PI headed for the newly-extended 75A/ 96D. US was still in 75B/ 96C when I flew PI through BWI in April 1986.

With Eastern's disappearance in 1991, its gates in 75B/96C became open for newcomers; CO and HP spent most of the '90s there. People Express used 75C/96B, as did Icelandair during the '80s.

The really big shuffle came when Maryland built the big extension onto 75C/96B for Southwest in about 2000. Delta moved to C, and Southwest moved over to B. When US gave up on their gate squatting after 9/11, UA, CO, and NW moved to the now-mostly-vacant D, as did F9 and Hooters when they entered. AirTran began their operation in D in November 2001 and uses 5 gates there today. The former TW gate in D is now used by NW.

Jim

[Edited 2005-05-01 02:56:59]
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jsnww81
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 11:19 am

I'm still not entirely clear on how the BAL-BWI conversion followed through - whether the existing concourses and terminal were demolished and replaced, or whether they were simply remodeled heavily. I believe that BWI's current control tower and administrative block are the same from the BAL days. However, I don't know if the concourses were razed and rebuilt or not.

Are there any old Baltimore hands around who can provide insight?
 
fxra
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 12:09 pm

WOw, i vaguely remember the old ATL terminal... mostly the round delta gates.. that is a really nifty site for an airline nerd (like myself)

later
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phatfarmlines
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 12:17 pm

Thanks for the maps James. I presume you got them from older OAG's? I've wondered about those satellite "tablets" at LAX and why Terminals 2 & 3 were designed parallel to the ticketing halls whereas Terminals 4-8 were perpendicular to the ticketing halls. Good reading though.
 
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LAXintl
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 12:41 pm

Thanks for the post. Very neat.
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JOSEMEX
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 1:02 pm

Thanks for the maps. It's funny to see how ubiquituous the "Insurance" counters were.
 
zrs70
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 1:06 pm

Great to see these additions. The BOS one.... I once had a xeroxed pamphlet with that diagram (in addition to many others). I'll have to go find it!
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crownvic
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 1:17 pm

Where's PHL & MIA? They were always feartured in the OAG airport pages!
 
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jsnww81
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 2:31 pm

Zrs70: Try and find that pamphlet. I'd be interested to hear what's in it.

Crownvic: I do have diagrams of PHL and MIA in my 1975 OAG. However, the MIA diagram is not very detailed - it's not nearly as neat the other ones, which is why I left it out. I can scan it in tomorrow though. I also have PHL, although in 1975 the place was a construction war zone (and the map reflects that). Glad you liked the rest!
 
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ramprat74
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 2:31 pm

Quoting Phatfarmlines (Reply 12):
Thanks for the maps James. I presume you got them from older OAG's? I've wondered about those satellite "tablets" at LAX and why Terminals 2 & 3 were designed parallel to the ticketing halls whereas Terminals 4-8 were perpendicular to the ticketing halls. Good reading though.

If they would of built terminals 2 and 3 like 4-7. They could of put four satellites on the northside of the field.
 
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zippyjet
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 3:20 pm

This is an outstanding site! And a belated thank you for supplying me with all that information about MIA back in the day. I can't wait till you do a in depth report on my home town airport BWI. And, I hope you do your historical report with pictures on MIA. I can find almost anything on the web but, historical text and pictures of these old but not forgotten airport terminals have been a challenge in finding. Only finding clear sharp images of those classic early DC 8 cabins with the Palomar seats has been more daunting.  bigthumbsup 
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N867BX
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 3:57 pm

These diagrams make me wish I had a time machine. I would love to see first hand the old airline/airport operations. Maybe I could just hang out at these old airports because I probably couldn't afford to fly before deregulation. I guess I'll have to settle for watching "Airport" on my VCR.
 
mdsh00
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 4:34 pm

This is a great site! One thing though. I saw that there is an in-depth page for all the airports but LAX is not in there, yet there is an image of the terminal map. Can anyone find the in-depth page for LAX in there? If it is there?
 
kl662
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 5:53 pm

What's up with the gender-specific lounges at SAN? Or are those just restrooms? (Cool maps, BTW. Interesting how little HOU has changed.)
 
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Aloha717200
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 6:41 pm

These are fascinating. It's interesting that you posted this, the other day I was reading through the main site http://oldterminals.topcities.com/ and reading info on the old Atlanta and Orlando terminals.

Aviation past is one of the most fascinating and nostalgic things. Too bad I didn't get to see most of these airports in their glory days. The site is fantastic though, I've got it bookmarked.
 
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jsnww81
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 10:25 pm

Mdsh00:

There's no page for LAX because the terminal is still in operation today. Same goes for BOS, PDX, SFO etc. I just used the site's server to house the maps so I could post them here. Sorry for the confusion.
 
Jet-lagged
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Sun May 01, 2005 11:09 pm

Jsnww81,
What a nice post and site. Takes me back, and some real pleasant memories bubbled up of the old terminals, looking at the old Stapleton layout diagrams and pics.
 
isitsafenow
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s

Mon May 02, 2005 12:58 am

Hello James...its better then ever. You and e mailed a while back about me working at MKC for Braniff. There are some very good memories in what you have shown with the MKC info. Thanks again.
You need to be interviewed for some TV show like CBS Sunday Morning. Your nitch would fit right into what they report about. Thanks again...
safe
If two people agree on EVERYTHING, then one isn't necessary.
 
727LOVER
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 1:08 am

I told James a while ago hat he should right a book(s) ala George Cearley's airport books. My suggestion still stands.  Smile
"We must accept finite disappointment, but never lose infinite hope." - Martin Luther King, Jr.
 
tgocean
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 1:22 am

These wonderful images remind me of that time when people actually dressed up to fly, when air travel was really tremendous fun, when every seat had some space, when you could go to the airport with the family and have a gread dinner and then watch the airplanes from the gates (I still remember my dad's and my first glimpse of a TWA 707 at LAX), when Western Airlines pitched "champagne flights" from LAX to SFO (orchids for the ladies, cigars for the gents, wood trim in the DC-6b's). Now air travel is like citizens' band radio (remember that?): The Public has brought it to the lowest level possible. Only the price of the ticket is important. If only they knew what they were missing. Thank heaven for business class and separate check-in and security lines.
 
BHMNONREV
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 2:08 am

Quoting Phatfarmlines (Reply 12):
Thanks for the maps James. I presume you got them from older OAG's? I've wondered about those satellite "tablets" at LAX and why Terminals 2 & 3 were designed parallel to the ticketing halls whereas Terminals 4-8 were perpendicular to the ticketing halls. Good reading though.

Terminals 2 and 3 were built in this manner because of the close proximity of the runways 24L and 24R to the central terminal complex. If you look at an overhead of LAX you can see 25R&L are much further away.

So I suppose this was more out of necessity than anything else...
 
Morvious
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 2:20 am

Sometimes when I have to work at Schiphol, I see some old photo's of the time, Schiphol was a little airport. Grey photo's of a concrete floor, with some buildings in the background, and a prop in the foreground!

Amazing to see what it bacme these days. A world on its own.

Thanks for sharing the maps. Its always nice to see how things were in the older days.
have a good day,

HereThen
 
HOMER71
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 2:49 am

Thanks for putting in the time, I enjoyed viewing these, espcially my home airports (HOU, SAT)

Take care...
"On spaceship earth there are no passengers...only crew."
 
707lvr
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 4:34 am

Very nice contribution. I looked at my local one first (SEA) and remembered when you could park at a meter on the drive and go inside just to look at planes. Imagine.
 
BHMNONREV
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 5:23 am

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
Lambert in 1964 doesn't look much different from Lambert in 2005. This is the same terminal, although its vaulted arches were much newer back in 1964.

They were still pretty recent at that time, three of them to be exact. The fourth on did not come until '66 or '67, I believe. I am not a big fan of the current state of Lambert, but the check-in level of the main terminal still looks nice to this day...

I would like to pass on my thanks for the post as well. And you have yourself a super website there. Keep up the good work..
 
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jsnww81
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 5:37 am

I had wondered if STL added a fourth arch. The 1964 map has a much different ticketing configuration than the map in my 1975 OAG, so I was wondering where the extra space came from.

I agree that Lambert's one bright spot is the ticketing lobby. It'd be great if they could remodel the concourses to continue the same sort of architectural theme... but I won't hold my breath.
 
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OzarkD9S
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 6:04 am

Awesome maps. Really brought back some memories.

So many old names relegated to the history pages...kinda sad actually.

It's amazing to remember how many of those airports I've been too, and close to those old maps.

Thanks for the scans!
Next up: STL-ATL-NAS-ATL-STL. :cloudnine:
 
jdaniel001
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 6:06 am

Very cool websites. I remember when they tore down the GSW terminal to make room for the AA headquarters.
We Are UNITED!
 
DAL767400ER
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 6:14 am

I love that website. It is a nice place to really learn about historic airport terminals, and with Google-maps, it is now easy to look how former airport/terminal sites have been developed. I just took a look at the old Jacksonville airport, and guess what, even though runway parts are visible, most property now belongs to Anheuser-Busch. "Drink & Fly" Big grin .
As a side question: I see that Jacksonville map, yet I can't seem to find Jacksonville listed on the main site. Anyone know what the deal is with that?
 
BHMNONREV
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 6:19 am

Quoting Jsnww81 (Reply 34):
I agree that Lambert's one bright spot is the ticketing lobby. It'd be great if they could remodel the concourses to continue the same sort of architectural theme... but I won't hold my breath.

Neither will I sir..

At one time, I saw some plans for a new concourse at Lambert in case of the demise of TWA, when nearly as many gates would not be needed. Plan was to keep the Main Terminal intact, and build a linear concourse somewhat similar to the NW Gateway in DTW, just not nearly as large. It was to have around 50 gates, and would have been built in stages. Concourses A and B would be razed, with the occupants moving to D. When the western half was complete, the occupant(s) of C would move to D, and C would be razed, then D after construction was complete.

Architecturally, it would have been similar to WN's East Terminal at STL..
 
DCA-ROCguy
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 6:34 am

It's interesting that SAS was at SEA all the way back in '68. Again, none of the more usual European suspects for a US gateway--no BOAC, British Cal, Air France, or Lufthansa. Is there a large Scandinavian population in Washington state?

Jim
Need a new airline paint scheme? Better call Saul! (Bass that is)
 
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jsnww81
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 6:36 am

DAL767400ER:
I haven't made a Jacksonville page yet. I used the website to host all the maps, even the maps of airports (like Imeson Field, SFO, LAX, etc.) that aren't on the site.

I do have plans to make a page for the old Imeson Field terminal, but I'm still trying to gather enough data.
 
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jsnww81
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 6:39 am

Hi Jim -

I'm not sure exactly how SAS got their start in Seattle, but I know that they've been there pretty much since the present-day airport opened in 1948. It may have had somethign to do with SAS' early propliners needing a refueling stop on their way down the coast (to LAX) and SEA was available. Either way you look at it, it must have been a success, because SAS is still there today ... and SAS is notorious for dropping unprofitable international routes (their overseas network is a shadow of its former self today.)
 
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jsnww81
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 11:54 am

I'm glad everyone is enjoying my website. I rely on viewer submissions to keep it going, so if you have anything - photos, maps, brochures, even just memories of these old facilities - please pass them on to me. I'm having a tough time finding new content since most of my sources have been exhausted.

Glad everyone enjoys this quirky little interest as much as I do!
 
UnitedFlyer
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 12:51 pm

Regarding the PDX map, it would appear that the current concourse E was the old south concourse and the current concourse A/B was the north concourse. Are the they the original concourses?

I also seem to remember as a little kid in the early 1980's PDX used gate numbers in the 100 range as opposed to the current concourse letter and gate number.

Would be fascinating to see some historical photos of PDX.....
 
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jsnww81
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 12:55 pm

UnitedFlyer:

For a period in the 1970s and 1980s, PDX lettered its concourses J, K, L and M rather than the more conventional B-E (Concourse A hadn't been built yet). I was never sure why they did it that way.

The North and South Concourses were the original concourses and later became Concourses C and D. When they opened, they were entirely on ground level - passengers took a stairway down from the ticket lobby to the gates on the apron level. In the 1960s upper-level holdrooms were jetways were slowly added along each concourse, until by the mid-1970s all boarding was done via jetways.

Both of those concourses are gone now - the original D was torn down in the early 1990s to make way for the new Concourse D, and C came down in 1999-2000 when that end of the terminal was rebuilt.
 
UnitedFlyer
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 1:04 pm

Thanks for the information! Looking at the historical map, there appears to be a 'dining room.' When I look at a current map www.flypdx.com, the dining room appears now appears to be a conference center. Is this the same part of the airport?

Thanks again for a great site with great maps!

[Edited 2005-05-02 06:08:34]

[Edited 2005-05-02 06:09:09]
 
bohica
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 1:33 pm

Thanks for posting these. It brought back lots of memories when I was a kid.
 
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ramprat74
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 1:47 pm

Quoting UnitedFlyer (Reply 43):
Regarding the PDX map, it would appear that the current concourse E was the old south concourse and the current concourse A/B was the north concourse. Are the they the original concourses?

I also seem to remember as a little kid in the early 1980's PDX used gate numbers in the 100 range as opposed to the current concourse letter and gate number.

Would be fascinating to see some historical photos of PDX

We have some great old pictures in our manager's office of the old concourses at PDX. We even have old pics from the terminal on Marine Drive. United had a hangar off of Marine Drive also. It was torn down around 1980.
 
SLC1
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 2:01 pm

Quoting DCA-ROCguy (Reply 39):
Is there a large Scandinavian population in Washington state?

Yes

...and I enjoy seeing that Copenhagen flight every time I come back from class.
We're gonna do what we like to call a "jetBlue how do you do", which is slang for dumping a bunch of fuel in the ocean
 
MQrampBOS
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RE: The Way Things Were - Terminal Maps In The 60s/70s

Mon May 02, 2005 5:14 pm

Nice maps. Interesting to see my home airport (BOS) before I was born. Terminal C hasn't changed much and Terminal D hasn't changed at all! Hope to see some pictures soon.
Don't put me on A7! I got out of the airport, so why send me back?

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