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Picture of the Boeing 777-236 aircraft

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Aircraft Taken at
More: British Airways
More: Boeing 777-236
More: Boston - General Edward Lawrence Logan International (BOS / KBOS)
More: USA - Massachusetts, July 12, 2009
Remark Photographer
G-ZZZC (cn 27107/15) Brand new GE90 almost installed, mechanics just finishing up the engine swap. An unusual sight at BOS. You gain a new respect and appreciation for the size of this engine when you see the mechanics up close and inside it!
More: Ronald J Stella
Contact Ronald J Stella
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Distinct views: 134,058
Photo added: July 24, 2009
Average views per day: 73

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Visitor comments (53)   [Hide]Post your own comments by rating the photo above!
A visitor from - posted Wed November 2, 2011:
Its cool how you can see how high bypass this engine is

A visitor from - posted Thu September 8, 2011:
Sorry for RR engines we dont use duct tape, we use gaffer tape!???

A visitor from United States posted Thu August 11, 2011:
Someone in NZ was sucked in. RIP. These Guys are the ones who command respect next to Nature. Hats Off.

A visitor from Iran, Islamic Republic Of posted Sat August 6, 2011:
I think it is a dangerous job.

A visitor from Bahamas posted Thu August 4, 2011:
Nice pic really shows the power and capability of this engine

A visitor from - posted Mon February 28, 2011:
A sight very few people ever normally get to see at all
great job my friend

A visitor from - posted Sun January 30, 2011:
I LOVE THIS

A visitor from - posted Sat December 25, 2010:
Wow!

A visitor from - posted Wed November 17, 2010:
It shows the "power" of that engines and their size

A visitor from - posted Tue November 2, 2010:
For the visitor from FINLAND the fan blades of jet engine can't be feathered and angle of attack is fixed.The reason for altering the angle of attack is to change the direction of airflow as is done in turboprops for breaking[reverse thrust]after landing.When a turboprop engine fails during flight the angle of attack is changed so that the blades are in line with airflow and donot turn therby reducing drag for fuel efficiency,this is called FEATHERING. Hope you'll understand.

A visitor from Finland posted Mon November 1, 2010:
Sorry to be stupid, but are the fan blades in a feathered position? If that's the case it was new to me that the angle of attack in jet engine fans can be altered. What are the reasons that require changing the blade angle and also feathering the blades? Thanks for the photo, it's excellent!

A visitor from - posted Thu October 21, 2010:
Great shot!
by the way, which airline does the tail on the right belong to?

A visitor from United States posted Fri October 15, 2010:
...And when I turned around to grab another wrench my pen fell out of my pocket and went down there. If you look you can just see it. Do you think we can reach it before boarding begins?

A visitor from United States posted Fri October 8, 2010:
Rolls (in My Opinion)Makes the best Engines for Commercial Aircraft! We at "AA" would love nothing more then a RR eng. on Everything we have......

A visitor from - posted Fri July 16, 2010:
This engine should be the GE90-94B, the 777-200LR uses the GE90-115B and 777-300ER GE90-110B. BA operates 777's with both GE and RR engines.

A visitor from Netherlands posted Thu May 27, 2010:
BA does not solely rely on RR to power their 777's; if you look closely on some BA 777 shots you can see "GE90" written on the cowling. But yes, there are BA 777's with RR engines too, like the one that crash-landed.

A visitor from Canada posted Thu May 20, 2010:
Actually the 36 does not stand for RR engines in '777-236'. The 36 is the customer number for BA at Boeing. You'll note that all BA aircraft ordered directly through Boeing ends in the '36 like the 737-236 with P&W engines, 737-436 with CFM-56 engines, 747-236 with RR engines, 747-436 with RR engines, 757-236 RR engines, 767-336 RR engines and the 777-236 with RR engines. It just so happens that BA like to support a local buiness like RR and they just happen to make a really good product. Just for reference Boeing's customer number for Delta is '32', Air Canada is '33', Air India is '37' and Qantas is '38' and we know that Qantas also likes RR engines.

A visitor from Canada posted Tue May 18, 2010:
These are rolls royce engines.BA uses rolls royce on all there 777 thats what the 36 stands for.

A visitor from France posted Mon May 17, 2010:
The proportion between the men and he motor

A visitor from - posted Mon May 3, 2010:
That is soooooo big that you can get lost in that thing:) Nice photo

A visitor from Canada posted Fri April 30, 2010:
Nice capture of what looks like one guy telling the other "you missed a spot right here."

If this is a GE90 and it's on a 777-200 that is NOT an 'LR' then it's the 'baby 90'. The GE90's on the 200LR and 777-300ER are the big beasts which have the cross section of the 737 fuselage. This engine is still huge though...

A visitor from South Africa posted Thu April 29, 2010:
Awesome!!! i remember that some of the first A380's engine diameter is as big as an MD-82. pretty extraordinary!!!

A visitor from - posted Sat March 27, 2010:
I wonder what will happens to these guys if the Jt suddenly runs.

A visitor from United States posted Sun January 24, 2010:
"I'm tellin ya Pete duct tape won't work there!"

A visitor from Brazil posted Mon November 23, 2009:
Well captured, gives a sense of the real size of this big engine. Thanks for sharing with us.

A visitor from France posted Tue November 3, 2009:
But where from comes this rattle?

A visitor from - posted Tue October 20, 2009:
When your've got a window seat a jt9d looks much like a trent400. a photo such as this destroys that assumption

A visitor from United Kingdom posted Wed October 14, 2009:
Is it true that the engine of the 777 can house the fuselage of a 757? Jugding by this photo, it can't be far off.
Otherwise; great photo.

A visitor from Iran, Islamic Republic Of posted Tue September 15, 2009:
Nice shot !

A visitor from - posted Sat August 15, 2009:
These guys are the real heroes cause we are not worried about anything because of them, saludos desde El salvador - centro america

A visitor from United States posted Mon August 10, 2009:
Turn on the engines XD

A visitor from United States posted Tue July 28, 2009:
THIS GIVES A SURREAL FEELING THAT FEW ARE PREVI TO.

A visitor from United States posted Tue July 28, 2009:
Sharpen those blades...

A visitor from United States posted Tue July 28, 2009:
Congratulations on Photographer's choice, Ron! What a fantastic view! -Dan

A visitor from United States posted Mon July 27, 2009:
The photo really shows how big those engines are. Thanks for uploading it.

Badr

A visitor from United Kingdom posted Mon July 27, 2009:
Brilliant capture! 5*, also is this the AN124 that made a stop in CWL?

A visitor from United States posted Sun July 26, 2009:
Indeed, that engine is huge. Keep in mind that the engine has the same diameter as the 737 body. Wow!

A visitor from - posted Sun July 26, 2009:
I love how this photo makes me feel so small, but in a good way.
Good lighting and an overall good composition!

A visitor from Germany posted Sun July 26, 2009:
Normally you'd expect the mechanics to use a protection mat to avoid any destruction to the acoustic liner panels in the air intake. otherwise graeat shot!

A visitor from United States posted Sat July 25, 2009:
Over 16,000 unique visitors for this 1st place photo
@ 12:30 EDT 7/25/09 ...Congrats- The world is watching www.airliners.net !

A visitor from Ireland posted Sat July 25, 2009:
GENERAL ELECTRIC GE90-76B

A visitor from United States posted Sat July 25, 2009:
CFM-56 engine in backgroud on ATI DC-8 !
Stella captures this perspective perfectly.

A visitor from South Africa posted Sat July 25, 2009:
Awsome shot. The GE90 is really a great piece of engineering. Can't get my mind around it.
Wow

A visitor from Finland posted Sat July 25, 2009:
What a engine!

A visitor from - posted Fri July 24, 2009:
Nice angle and an awesome engine. Here in Canada one would need an AME (Aircraft Maintenance Engineer) licence with an M2 classification and an endorsement on the Boeing 777-200 series to sign out the aircraft. To guide the aircraft on the ramp, only job-specific training on the job is required.

A visitor from - posted Fri July 24, 2009:
You have to love the GE 90! Huuuge. Nothin else to say, perfekct cpmparison.

A visitor from United States posted Fri July 24, 2009:
To answer the persons question about what degree. To work on an a/c as a mechanic, in the US you need an A&P Certification (google it). To be the guy with the wands and waves the planes in on the ramp, pretty all you need is a high school diploma.

Picture is perfect, until now I never understood how big those engines really are in comparison.

A visitor from United States posted Fri July 24, 2009:
I think she's smiling from all the "male attention"!

A visitor from - posted Fri July 24, 2009:
Those men inside the engine . What would their qualifications be ? My little brother ( 6 lol- he LOVES this website) wants "to be the man who fixes the airplane engines, and waves the flashlights to show the pilots where they can park" :) . I'd imagine they'd have a degree ? in Mechanical Engineering ? or some particular type of technical\vocational course ?

A visitor from United States posted Fri July 24, 2009:
Wow, such a big engine. This is weird espcially since I saw the antonov 124 carrying this engine landing in Boston.

A visitor from United States posted Fri July 24, 2009:
Stella's excellent composition raises the pix to art level.

A visitor from United States posted Fri July 24, 2009:
Wow! Spectacular photo...very high quality. The brand new engine looks massive with the engineers inside of it.

A visitor from United Kingdom posted Fri July 24, 2009:
This engine was not new, but freshly overhauled by the company I work for. Flown to BOS from STN on UR82029 An124

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