Aviation Photo #1353388: Boeing 737-8K2 - Transavia Airlines


Photo 4,260 of 4,263 by Steve Brimley
  • JPC van Heijst - AirTeamImages
    Transavia Airlines
    Boeing 737-8K2
    Boeing 737-800 (BBJ2/C-40/P-8)
    Boeing 737-800 (BBJ2/C-40/P-8)
    Boeing
    28377
    277
    PH-HZE
    Bergamo (Milan) - Orio al Serio (Antonio Locatelli)
    Italy
    April 1, 2008
  • 357

Photo Details

Photo ID
#1353388
Views
213,209
Manufacturer
Line No.
Country
Accepted
May 08, 2008
Caption
Ever wondered what the inside of a 737 wheelwell would look like? As you see, there are a lot of coloured parts, tubes and wires. [Nikkor 10.5mm Fisheye]
Width
1024px
Height
685px

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Photographer's Choice
May 09, 2008

Photographer


Photos
215
Views
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Likes
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Joined
Jun 2005

Comments (75)

Anonymous
8 years ago
Unusual, interesting view! was it comfortable inside? :)
Anonymous
8 years ago
Incredible!!!
Anonymous
8 years ago
OK this is definitely not the place to sit for a free ride.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Unique!! Great idea for a shot. Now I wonder how did you to place de cam there......
Anonymous
8 years ago
Great Perspective, as you mentioned, lots of colored parts. For all of us aircraft technicians, we know how to interpret what each means.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Looks grea and complex.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Indeed a very rare view. My plumber would be ashamed for this, but... he does not document his work.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Rare angle, gives us that is *not* technicians an insight... :)
Anonymous
8 years ago
This is Art.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Cool, just incredible point of view
Anonymous
8 years ago
Very interesting! I would never imagined such complexity.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Well, well, well.

Sorry, couldn't resist.
Anonymous
8 years ago
That is what I call an airplane!!
Fastinating photo!
Anonymous
8 years ago
Great photo taken from unique position! Well done!!
Anonymous
8 years ago
Unique photo indeed. A new perspective on those tragic hitch-a-ride stories.
Anonymous
8 years ago
I wonder how many stowaways have met their fate in this wheel well...
Anonymous
8 years ago
Amazing shot, with amazing location, how did you get in there.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Great Angle for this Photo!!!
remembering me to my Nightshifts for the Inspection at the Nightstops at HAJ-HapagLloyd
Anonymous
8 years ago
Interesting shot, five stars...
What's that orangy stuff on the walls of the well? Hydraulic? Deicing liquid? Dirt?
Anonymous
8 years ago
And Now for Something Completely Different! 5*
Anonymous
8 years ago
For all those who are wondering... You stand upright on the tarmac, you upper half is in the wheel well, you turn towards the other gear, lift the camera a bit and ... klick!
Anonymous
8 years ago
Very unique shot!

And in response to the UK visitor, i would think thats De-ice fluid (Type I)
Anonymous
8 years ago
This photo shows the complexity of the machine usually hided from the outside world! Wonderfull!!
For the United kingdom visitor, the orangy stuff on the walls of the well might be a coating applied for rust prevention, such as Dinitrol.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Blimey!...a bit of plumbing and wiring in there!!??!!
Defenitely need the manual to do any work in here!! :-)
Anonymous
8 years ago
One of the rare pics about mechanics of airplanes
Anonymous
8 years ago
Unique perspective! We have all seen landing gear wheel wells, but the 737 does not have MLG doors. In this photo you can see the rubber seal that acts as a fairing between the tire and the airframe
Anonymous
8 years ago
Great Pic!!! Im guessing the front is to the right of the picture, but just for the record, can you confirm??
Anonymous
8 years ago
How Did You Get In There?
Anonymous
8 years ago
Actually, Yes, I did wonder how that would look like! And a day or two later this photo caught my eye! Great shot!
Anonymous
8 years ago
Thank you for all the wonderful comments and votes. Indeed the right side is the front part of the airplane.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Nice shot!
The orange fluid is probably an anti-corrosion chemical.
Anonymous
8 years ago
I would like to see the movie - same POV when retracting and opening. Gave you *****!
Anonymous
8 years ago
Nice imagination of how much technology is inside a wheelwell! Great shot !
Anonymous
8 years ago
Really great shot and informative as well.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Is it just me or are those wires over-exposed to weather conditions?....won't those get affected by time?
Anonymous
8 years ago
There you go! That's a first!
But, are you a stow-away?
Anonymous
8 years ago
The orangy stuff is a corrosion protection fluid which sticks to the aircraft structure and prevents water ingress. it is called lps3.wheel wells are not always that clean by the way
Anonymous
8 years ago
Viewing this photo is like sitting inside the front wheel area. The mass of wires and tubes, etc really make this a striking photo with the shot of the runway and front wheel in the middle of the photo.
Anonymous
8 years ago
The is shot is extremely unique and like nothing I have ever seen before......WOW
Anonymous
8 years ago
This is the one of the best photos of 737NG L/H MLG and its wheeel well I have ever seen. One of the most complex part of A/P for maintenance.
Thanks!
Anonymous
8 years ago
Never before seen perspective! Obviously looking at the main gear strut, let alone this wheel well, it's a relatively new aircraft. And no, this opening does not expose anything any more than any other open wheel well does on other aircraft.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Lovely shot! how did u do it? great!!!!
Anonymous
8 years ago
5 stars for the unique perspective.
Anonymous
8 years ago
Simply brilliant and innovative
Anonymous
7 years ago
Well designed photographically. Also an eye opener as to what is down there when I land, take-off.
Anonymous
7 years ago
Wonderful shot i had no idea that it was possible to get that veiw!
Anonymous
7 years ago
Very interesting photo, never thought it would look like that. Very good photo
Anonymous
7 years ago
Excellent idea 5/5 stars definitely
Anonymous
7 years ago
Look at all the wiring! It's crazy!
Anonymous
7 years ago
Does the 737 wheel come up sideways?
Anonymous
7 years ago
The world inside-out perspective never looked so well
Anonymous
7 years ago
Wonderful, i was recently in the WestJet hangar at CYYC, the inside looks like that, only a lot dirtier, this an incredibly clean aircraft hahaha very nice
Anonymous
7 years ago
Awesome !

This has got to be one of the craziest angles seen in this site.

Is this kind of picture what makes this site so special !

Greetings from Argentina.
Anonymous
7 years ago
Pff, so many wires and tubes, never saw it like this!
5*
Anonymous
7 years ago
A remarkably original perspective from which to view the undercarriage.
Anonymous
7 years ago
It is an amazing feat of engineering , that all those hydraulic components are so exposed to low atmospheric pressures and temperatures associated with high altitude, yet are not affected .
Anonymous
7 years ago
YES, 5 Stars! The orange warning stripes on shaft is the flap drive torque tube. VERY dangerous mechanism. Rotates VERY fast and instantaneously. The coating on the structure is indeed "corrosion inhibiting compound" or CIC. Brand name Dinol. Tank on lower left is hydraulic reservoir. Levers and shafts on upper right are the aileron and spoiler mixer mechanisms....aka "monkey-motion". Must be a new aircraft...too clean.
Anonymous
7 years ago
Never seen this one before... amazing!
Anonymous
7 years ago
WOW! What a creative photo! I always wonder why Boeing designed the 737 like this, with the wheel out in the open. Doesn't that create more drag, thus increasing fuel consumption?
Anonymous
7 years ago
!!! 5 star shot! winderful :-)
Anonymous
6 years ago
Very awesome view, it's nothing we get to see ever, so thanks for this magnificent image, showing us the inside of that 737 MLG bay. However I am curious to know if once the wheels have been retracted into the wheel, is there a breaker that will stop it from spinning furthermore after off, so that it doesnt gyro-spin after takeoff.
Anonymous
6 years ago
Ohh, it is so complex! How do you get this exclusive shot?
Anonymous
6 years ago
Hope you got out before take off. Great shot!
Anonymous
6 years ago
Great shot! But how do you position yourself to get that photo?
Anonymous
6 years ago
Fascinating!
Anonymous
6 years ago
Someone asked, how did he position himself to take this shot? The photographer is standing in the right hand wheel well and looking over the centerline of the aircraft (called the "Keel beam") at the left wheel well. Great rare shot. Hope we see more like this.
Anonymous
6 years ago
Awesome photo and such a great perspective on the mechanics of these amazing machines. Hope to see much more from you! Look at all that engineering....wicked! :-)
Anonymous
6 years ago
As myself a pilot of a BOEING 738 when the bird is in for check-up I go-around with the ingeneers and they show me how many small parts are needed to make those big birds fly, keep-up the good job, from capt. L. G ROCHETTE AIR FRANCE pilot,
Anonymous
6 years ago
It is just amazing the amount of work and precision that goes into building just one 737 and there are thousands of these in the whole world. Great shot!!
Anonymous
6 years ago
Excellent perspective on this shot. A tremendous eye for photography. Well done!
Anonymous
5 years ago
Hard to imagine how some crazy people trying (or tried in the past) to travel illegally into the landing gear compartment.
Anonymous
4 years ago
Woah, nice shot! With the size of the hole to fit the landing gear in when raised, this shot really gives you an idea of how big the wheels are!
Anonymous
4 years ago
An angle I have never seen before, and I did not expect so many mechanical parts open to air,
Anonymous
3 years ago
It's gorgeous! Imagine what will happen if only one of all those wires is cutted! An aircraft is very complicated!
Anonymous
3 years ago
I would love to be there