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Picture of the Saunders-Roe SR-45 Princess aircraft

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Aircraft Taken at
More: Untitled (Saunders-Roe)
More: Saunders-Roe SR-45 Princess
More: Farnborough (FAB / EGLF)
More: UK - England, September 13, 1953
Remark Photographer
G-ALUN (cn SR901) The sole Princess to fly makes a low flypast at the 1953 Farnborough SBAC air show. The 219 ft wingspan aircraft was powered by 10 Bristol Proteus turboprops, the inner eight being coupled in pairs.
More: R.A.Scholefield
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Distinct views: 142,686
Photo added: August 30, 2009
Average views per day: 80

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Visitor comments (26)   [Hide]Post your own comments by rating the photo above!
A visitor from United States posted Thu April 17, 2014:
I'd love to see this in color. I see a nice light/dark blue mix...Very regal 8) Amazing!

A visitor from Germany posted Fri April 12, 2013:
Superb shot of a great plane

A visitor from South Africa posted Sat January 5, 2013:
Not rated one star,missunderstood the system @least 4 star.

A visitor from - posted Sun March 18, 2012:
That is a cool plane it looks like a flying cruiz ship. Love it!

A visitor from - posted Sun March 18, 2012:
Interestingly, before it was called "Princess" it was called "The Titanic".

A visitor from Canada posted Tue February 15, 2011:
This excellent photo shows off the beautiful lines of the Saunders-Roe SR-45 Princess very well. What a classic!

A visitor from - posted Sun November 21, 2010:
A flying cruise ship!!!

A visitor from Netherlands posted Mon May 17, 2010:
Interestingly, it has 10 engines. The 4 inner nacelles house 2 engines each, driving contra-rotating props, whereas the outer nacelles contain 1 engine driving a single propeller.

A visitor from Netherlands posted Fri May 14, 2010:
Not the daintiest of princesses.. Queen mum might have been more suitable:) Fantastic though, sad there isn't one left.

A visitor from United Kingdom posted Mon January 11, 2010:
Beautiful hull design.

A visitor from United States posted Wed December 2, 2009:
Geez! It's a flying building!

A visitor from - posted Sun November 22, 2009:
What a piece of aviation history. I remember a cartoon in Flying Review at that time which was a drawing of the Princess over Farnborough captioned "normally, the Princess would not be able to land, however this year...." This due to the unusually heavy rain during airshow week.

A visitor from Mexico posted Sun October 4, 2009:
From Mexico:
A special touch of deeply human proud could shine in the souls and lives of passengers and crew when they were in flight.

A visitor from - posted Sun October 4, 2009:
Before the A380, you have this thing.
So, while the A380 is the whalejet, this thing is the Whaleprop.
And, this one was 60 years ahead of the Whalejet, lol

A visitor from Belgium posted Mon August 31, 2009:
Great historical document! Makes me think of a "whaleprop"!

A visitor from - posted Mon August 31, 2009:
Just like a mini spruce goose. I never knew this type of AC ever existed. Only 1 ever airworthy. I'm very excited now I get to search and read up on this wonderful gem- flying boats were the best!

A visitor from - posted Mon August 31, 2009:
What a great time period, aircraft appeared to be more artistic in design and less emphasis was given into getting every inch out of range and payload. those were the times...

A visitor from - posted Mon August 31, 2009:
Wow, you are in my dreams darling... I see you landing in the Hudson after a long flight from the UK.

A visitor from - posted Mon August 31, 2009:
Wow, kind of like a mini version of a spruce goose! For 1953 though at the beginning of the jet age (and war surplus) I now believe I have the answer of why only 3 prototypes were developed. Really sad we don't have more examples of this type in museums...

A visitor from - posted Mon August 31, 2009:
Wow these were the glory days of aviation! I'm sure a small part of all of us would like to go back in time and get on a few of these flights to see how things were really done in the past. No more seat back IFE converations, - this is how aviation was meant to be and when oceanic aviators were the astronauts of their time.

A visitor from Netherlands posted Mon August 31, 2009:
Thnx for posting. Never took a good look at this one. Hopefully everybody learned a lot in the development process..

A visitor from - posted Mon August 31, 2009:
Great historic shot. That they didn't preserve one of these beauties, especially given the British penchant for aircraft preservation, is truly unforgivable... along with the Barbazon's.

A visitor from Canada posted Sun August 30, 2009:
Outrageous aircraft.

A visitor from France posted Sun August 30, 2009:
What a design.....

A visitor from Brazil posted Sun August 30, 2009:
Can you imagine this one in a low flight?

A visitor from Hong Kong posted Sun August 30, 2009:
Great shot, never even seen a pic of one before!

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