Search found 477 matches

  • 1
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
by Trident
Sat Mar 04, 2000 9:21 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: VC-10 Questions
Replies: 3
Views: 1061

RE: VC-10 Questions

If you read my post on the Trident elsewhere, you will see that the main problem with British airliners of this period was tailoring the designs too close to the national airlines' (BEA or BOAC) requirements. Technically, the VC10 was (and is) an excellent aircraft. However, its excellent performanc...

Jump to post
by Trident
Sat Mar 04, 2000 6:46 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: The Hearald
Replies: 3
Views: 1012

RE: The Hearald

Like my reply on the Britannia, I also never had the opportunity to fly on the Herald. My memories of Heralds are also from Dublin (from the early 70's through to the early 80's). At that time, they were the mainstay of British Island Airways (BIA) and before that British United Island Airways. The ...

Jump to post
by Trident
Sat Mar 04, 2000 6:29 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: A 75th Anniversary
Replies: 9
Views: 944

RE: A 75th Anniversary

The German Zeppelin company was operating regular passenger flights as early as 1905! The oldest established current airline is KLM who began operating in 1919. The BA ancestor who operated the London - Paris flight in 1919 was (I think) Air Transport and Travel Ltd with a converted De Havilland DH-...

Jump to post
by Trident
Sat Mar 04, 2000 6:14 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Vtol Airliners?
Replies: 6
Views: 1809

RE: Vtol Airliners?

The idea of a VTOL airliner has been kicked about for almost 40 years. The nearest anyone came to putting the concept into practice was Fairey with their Rotodyne (as described above). Various European companies have drawn up designs over the years, notably from VFW/Fokker, Dornier and Hawker Siddel...

Jump to post
by Trident
Sat Mar 04, 2000 5:59 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Turbulence
Replies: 10
Views: 1163

RE: Turbulence

Airliners are not designed to be flown upside down. You can just about get away with it if you keep positive G on the structure, otherwise you will find yourself in big trouble. Tex Johnston very nearly lost his job over the roll he performed at Seattle. Subsequent to this incident, a US arline lost...

Jump to post
by Trident
Sat Mar 04, 2000 5:38 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: TV Series "Airport"
Replies: 20
Views: 3497

RE: TV Series

How can someone say they don'y like BBC programming - its what keeps British TV sane for goodness sake. Back in 1986 they spent a whole week at Heathrow broadcasting live. The presenters were Sarah Greene, Mike Smith and Peter McCann with various special guests They looked at all aspects of running ...

Jump to post
by Trident
Sat Mar 04, 2000 5:27 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: American 747
Replies: 9
Views: 1441

RE: American 747

I'm pretty sure that American had no international routes at the time they operated the 747. The 74's had all been traded in by 1977. NASA's first Shuttle Carrier 747 was ex-American and was still wearing basic American livery when used for the Shuttle glide test flights in 1977.

Jump to post
by Trident
Sat Mar 04, 2000 5:17 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Two Rumors About Designing The 747
Replies: 11
Views: 1836

RE: Two Rumors About Designing The 747

Firing dead birds at windscreens and into rotating fan blades is a normal test when developing new airliners or engines.

Jump to post
by Trident
Sat Mar 04, 2000 5:17 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Two Rumors About Designing The 747
Replies: 11
Views: 1836

RE: Two Rumors About Designing The 747

Firing dead birds at windscreens and into rotating fan blades is a normal test when developing new airliners or engines.

Jump to post
by Trident
Sat Mar 04, 2000 5:10 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: 727-200 Or 737-300?
Replies: 9
Views: 2167

RE: 727-200 Or 737-300?

727 - no argument, mainly because they won't be around for many more years. I always think advice on seating etc. is pointless as airlines do their own thing on comfort, pitch etc. As an example, one of my most comfortable flights was on a 757 (BA) and one of my most uncomfortable flights was also o...

Jump to post
by Trident
Fri Mar 03, 2000 4:08 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Tail Cone On A Bae-146 Question...
Replies: 8
Views: 3334

RE: Tail Cone On A Bae-146 Question...

Early Caravelles also did not feature reverse thrust. When necessary, they used a braking parachute (like a B-52 or Vulcan).

Incidentally, the Space Shuttle also used a split speed brake system - using its rudder.

Jump to post
by Trident
Fri Mar 03, 2000 4:04 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: British Midland Transatlantic
Replies: 10
Views: 1434

RE: British Midland Transatlantic

British Midland flew trans-Atlantic flights in the 1970's using a 707. What's wrong with the title British Midland? If they think it is innappropriate, they could always revert to their old title, BMA. Anonymous initials abound, even with national airlines (SAS, SABENA, QANTAS, LOT etc.). I'd hate t...

Jump to post
by Trident
Wed Mar 01, 2000 9:22 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Your Treasured Airline Crap
Replies: 33
Views: 1739

RE: Your Treasured Airline Crap

Apart from post cards and the usual "stuff" (tickets etc), ny favourite bits are some technical manuals and promotional material passed on to me by my late uncle who was a technical instructor with Aer Lingus up until he died. Included are: Boeing 720-048 technical manual (1961) Pratt & Whitney broc...

Jump to post
by Trident
Wed Mar 01, 2000 9:09 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: A Russian Concorde?
Replies: 6
Views: 2932

RE: A Russian Concorde?

Quite right about the foreplanes, the TU-144 has enormous flaps, they almost touch the ground when fully extended, and make the plane look extremely ungainly whan taxi-ing. The TU-144 also has a very pronounced tail-down "sit" on the ground. I understand also that the machine NASA were using had bee...

Jump to post
by Trident
Wed Mar 01, 2000 9:02 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: British Airways Helicopters
Replies: 4
Views: 3123

RE: British Airways Helicopters

BA Helicopters was formed as one of the divisions of BA when the then new airline came fully into existence in 1974. The fleet was essentially handed over fron BEA Helicopters who had pioneered commercial helicopter services in the UK from the early 1950's. Various types had been used, the Bell 47, ...

Jump to post
by Trident
Wed Mar 01, 2000 8:47 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Candair CL44
Replies: 8
Views: 1160

RE: Candair CL44

The CL-44 grew out of the licence which had been granted to Canadair to allow them to build a PISTON engined version of the Britannia, known as the Argus, for the Royal Canadian Air Force. The Argus served as an anti-submarine aircraft into the 1970's, eventually being placed by the Lockheed Aurora,...

Jump to post
by Trident
Wed Mar 01, 2000 8:28 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Original 747 Operators
Replies: 6
Views: 1394

RE: Original 747 Operators

Strictly speaking, Aer Lingus did not order the 747, the Trans Atlantic operations at the time were run by "Aerlinte Eireann" - translated into English as "Irish International Airlines". The logo used at the time showed "Aer Lingus - Irish International Airlines" on aircraft flown to the UK and Euro...

Jump to post
by Trident
Mon Feb 28, 2000 6:53 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: A Russian Concorde?
Replies: 6
Views: 2932

RE: A Russian Concorde?

One aspect of the TU-144 story not often mentioned is that the aircraft that flew in 1968 and the aircraft that entered service in 1977 were almost entirely different designs. The original TU-144 had a simple "Double Delta" wing and its engines grouped in a central housing under the fuselage. The la...

Jump to post
by Trident
Mon Feb 28, 2000 6:39 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Privatization Of British Airways
Replies: 5
Views: 4693

RE: Privatization Of British Airways

Mrs Thatcher's government intended to privatise BA in 1985. That's the reason the livery was changed at the end of 1984, part of the new image. However, it was decided that the airline was still not ready in 1985 (it had too many un-economical aircraft in service - BAC1-11's, Trident's etc. and too ...

Jump to post
by Trident
Mon Feb 28, 2000 6:25 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: When Did DC Become MD
Replies: 6
Views: 2432

RE: When Did DC Become MD

The old Douglas Aircraft Corporation suffered an enormous cash flow shortage in 1967, mainly because of trying to fulfill its bulging order book for DC-9's, the fastest selling twin jets at the time. It was rescued by the merger with McDonnell. The DC-10 project was already under way by 1967 so reta...

Jump to post
by Trident
Mon Feb 28, 2000 6:10 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: 747-200 Vs. 747SP
Replies: 6
Views: 2411

RE: 747-200 Vs. 747SP

My 1973 Observer's book qoutes a range for the 747-200 with reserves of 7,080 miles and with full passenger load of 6,820 miles. Although the official qoutes for the SP seem to be not much greater, I think in operational terms the SP did offer substantial range improvements over the 100's and 200's ...

Jump to post
by Trident
Mon Feb 28, 2000 5:42 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Anyone Fly A Bristol Britannia?
Replies: 11
Views: 3930

RE: Anyone Fly A Bristol Britannia?

Unfortunately, I too cannot say I ever had the chance to fly in a Brit'. By the time I was old enough to afford overseas holidays, most Britannia's had been relegated to freighting and livestock flights. Being a Dublin spotter in the mid 1970's was good if you liked the Britannia. Aer Turas operated...

Jump to post
by Trident
Sun Feb 27, 2000 8:21 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Boeing SST
Replies: 5
Views: 1990

RE: Boeing SST

As Britain, France and the USSR were building supersonic airliners in the mid 1960's, the American manufacturers felt they could not be left out. However, they were not convinced of the economic viability of such a programme so were reluctant to go ahead without government assistance. The US governm...

Jump to post
by Trident
Sun Feb 27, 2000 8:07 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Your Best Take Off
Replies: 8
Views: 1383

RE: Your Best Take Off

Best - BA Boeing 757 (G-BIKJ) from Dublin to LHR in 1985 2nd Best - Aer Lingus Shorts 360 from Sligo to Dublin (1987) Worst (and scariest) - Rather tired Boeing 737-200 of Phaoroh Airlines from Luxor to Aswan (last March). It took so long to get off the ground, I thought the pilot was planning to dr...

Jump to post
by Trident
Sun Feb 27, 2000 5:59 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: The Comet 4
Replies: 6
Views: 1457

RE: The Comet 4

The last civillian pasenger flight of a Comet was in 1980 when Dan Air finally retired the type from service. The Royal Aircraft Establishment here at Farnborough (where I live) continued to fly a Series 4 as did the A & AEE at Boscombe Down for quite a few years after. The Boscombe Comet only retir...

Jump to post
by Trident
Sun Feb 27, 2000 5:42 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Airline Commercials
Replies: 24
Views: 1719

RE: Airline Commercials

My favourite recent TV ad was United's showing a freckled face kid on a cliff top watching a (computer generated no doubt) flypast of hundreds of United airliners. These ranged from 777's to Caravelles, Ford Trimotors, DC-3's etc. In other words, everything United ever flew. No mention has been made...

Jump to post
by Trident
Sun Feb 27, 2000 5:17 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: What Happened To The Trident Series
Replies: 3
Views: 2132

RE: What Happened To The Trident Series

Its not true to say that De Havilland "forgot" to consider other potential customers when designing the Trident. In those days, the normal procedure in Britain was for the manufacturers to respond to specifications set out by the nationalised airlines (BEA and BOAC). After meeting those requirements...

Jump to post
  • 1
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10