Search found 477 matches

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by Trident
Sun Aug 24, 2003 8:24 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: National Air & Space Museum (Washington D.C.)
Replies: 20
Views: 4271

RE: National Air & Space Museum (Washington D.C.)

If you have any interest <acronym title="Royal Air Maroc (Morocco)">AT</acronym> <acronym title="Albenga (Villanova d'Albenga) (- Clemente Panero) (ALL / LIMG), Italy">ALL</acronym> in aviation or space you will find the NASM in downtown Washington DC fantastic. I visited it many years ago (1984) an...

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by Trident
Sat Aug 23, 2003 12:35 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Favorite All-time Airline Livery Is........
Replies: 67
Views: 6179

RE: Favorite All-time Airline Livery Is........

How about Court Line (1970-74). A British version of the Braniff theme.

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by Trident
Fri Aug 22, 2003 2:52 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: What Was The Comet Like?
Replies: 37
Views: 5741

RE: What Was The Comet Like?

No Germans were involved in the Comet. The British cocked it up all by themselves. Von Braun was not involved with the V1 "cruise missile" programme. That was a Luftwaffe project built by Fieseler. Von Braun was with the Army missile team. The Americans made far more use of German transonic research...

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by Trident
Thu Aug 21, 2003 5:48 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Six Most Influential Airliners
Replies: 36
Views: 4835

RE: Six Most Influential Airliners

Boeing 247 - first "modern" airliner Douglas DC-3 - first airliner capable of making a profit for its operators and, beacuse of large scale production for the miltary, hugely influential in establishing the airline scene post World War 2. Vickers Viscount - proved that turbine powred airliners were ...

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by Trident
Thu Aug 21, 2003 5:11 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: The Failure Of The Comets And VC-10's
Replies: 9
Views: 6649

RE: The Failure Of The Comets And VC-10's

The V.1000 project proves my point. The British aircraft industry was so locked into a system of dependence on government contracts for business that I don't think it ever dawned on them that they should even TRY to find other customers, at least not until the initial design phase and prototype cons...

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by Trident
Thu Aug 21, 2003 4:33 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: The Failure Of The Comets And VC-10's
Replies: 9
Views: 6649

RE: The Failure Of The Comets And VC-10's

The real question is - why did British designed airliners of the 1950s and 60s (with one or two notable exceptions) consistently fail to attract customers other than the national airlines (BOAC or BEA)? The answer lies, not in lack of technical prowess but more to do with procurement procedures, poo...

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by Trident
Thu Aug 21, 2003 7:16 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: What Was The Comet Like?
Replies: 37
Views: 5741

RE: What Was The Comet Like?

It's many years since I've seen the film "No Highway in the Sky" so I can't remember much about it - apart from the fact that it starred Jimmy Stewart and Marlene Dietriche. I always though that the 'plane used was totally ficticous and props and models were used. I'll have to do s web search and se...

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by Trident
Thu Aug 21, 2003 6:42 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: What Was The Comet Like?
Replies: 37
Views: 5741

RE: What Was The Comet Like?

His autobiography, "Slide Rule", is also worth reading.

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by Trident
Thu Aug 21, 2003 6:13 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: What Was The Comet Like?
Replies: 37
Views: 5741

RE: What Was The Comet Like?

Neville Shute Norway (to give him his full name) was a stress engineer with Vickers and worked alongside Barnes Wallis in the design of the airship R100. Vickers, of course, were the British experts in pressurised fuselages having built high altitude pressurised Wellingtons and Spitfires during the ...

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by Trident
Thu Aug 21, 2003 5:29 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: When Did You Become An Aviation Nut? Stories?
Replies: 26
Views: 5395

RE: When Did You Become An Aviation Nut? Stories?

I think it's in the genes. My grandad was a mechanic and loved all things mechanical, including aircraft. My uncle (his son) joined Aer Lingus in the 1950s and rose through the ranks to becoame a chief technical instuctor and qualified 747 Flight Engineer (although he never actually worked as a Flig...

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by Trident
Thu Aug 21, 2003 5:17 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: What Was The Comet Like?
Replies: 37
Views: 5741

RE: What Was The Comet Like?

But the "homework" was based on what THEY had learned from their own experiences, not De Havilland's. In fact, De Havilland DID have a history of structural problems with their aircraft going back to the 1930s. The Albatross airliner and the Mosquito had serious problems with defective glues etc cau...

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by Trident
Thu Aug 21, 2003 3:30 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: What Was The Comet Like?
Replies: 37
Views: 5741

RE: What Was The Comet Like?

I never had the opportunity to fly in one but I have been on board the preserved example at Duxford. What strikes you (almost literally) is how small the cabin is. Even I, at 5ft 6 ins had to duck entering through the passenger door. De Havilland bit off rather more than they could chew when going a...

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by Trident
Tue Aug 19, 2003 2:14 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: On Now - BBC2 (UK) - Lake Constance Crash
Replies: 8
Views: 3652

RE: On Now - BBC2 (UK) - Lake Constance Crash

Overall an interesting series. However, nowadays too many of these programmes try to personalise the issues too much with emotional in depth interviews with next of kin. These don't really add anything to our understanding as to why the accident happened, or how it a simlar accident might be prevent...

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by Trident
Mon Aug 18, 2003 9:28 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Bermuda Triangle!
Replies: 21
Views: 3224

RE: Bermuda Triangle!

The actual rate of loss of ships and aircraft in that region are not statistically any different to other busy parts of the world. In more recent times the release of gas from ocean floor strata has been put forward as a possible explanation for the seemingly sudden sinking of ships in this area.

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by Trident
Mon Aug 18, 2003 8:31 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Bermuda Triangle!
Replies: 21
Views: 3224

RE: Bermuda Triangle!

It was from both the 60s <acronym title="Virgin Express (Belgium)">TV</acronym> series AND from the 1984 film. The myth behind "The Bermuda Triangle" received a huge boost in 1975 when Charles Berlitz published the book of the same name. It made Berlitz a very rich man, even it was all a load of tosh.

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by Trident
Mon Aug 18, 2003 4:05 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Air UK - Your Memories
Replies: 22
Views: 3916

RE: Air UK - Your Memories

No mention of the BAC 1-11 in Air UK service yet, nor the time when they flew both Heralds and F-27s at the same time. It was not long before the Heralds were disposed of as their economic shortcomings were highlighted once they were compared directly to the capabilities of the F-27. I also herad th...

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by Trident
Mon Aug 18, 2003 3:58 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: 747SP--a Silly Design?
Replies: 51
Views: 6285

RE: 747SP--a Silly Design?

Good information Triple Seven. Exactly as I was saying in my post. The <acronym title="SATA Air Azores (Portugal)">SP</acronym> was essentially a blocking tactic ny Boeing and I don't think they were that concened about how profitable the whole programme would be. Keeping their customers loyal to Bo...

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by Trident
Mon Aug 18, 2003 1:31 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Air UK - Your Memories
Replies: 22
Views: 3916

RE: Air UK - Your Memories

And what about the two airlines that merged in 1977 to form Air UK, Air Anglia and British Island Airways (BIA)? I have fond memories of BIA Heralds droning in and out of Dublin when they served the Blackpool and Ronaldsway routes. I'm even old enough to remember BIA's ancestor, British United Airwa...

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by Trident
Mon Aug 18, 2003 12:53 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Bae14+6
Replies: 7
Views: 1744

RE: Bae14+6

Britains third most successful airliner (after the Viscount and the BAC 1-11) even if it had an American designed wing and American built engines. The real shame about the 146 is that it lost eight years through government ineptitude. Hawker Siddeley wanted to launch the project in 1973 but needed G...

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by Trident
Sun Aug 17, 2003 7:34 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: 747SP--a Silly Design?
Replies: 51
Views: 6285

RE: 747SP--a Silly Design?

Boeing were concerned about the iminent arrival of long range versions of the DC-10 and L1011. They decided to build the 747SP to ensure that they had an ultra long range aircraft in their "product mix" so as to sway possible "defectees" to Lockheed or McDonnel Douglas. In the event, the 747SP did n...

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by Trident
Sun Aug 17, 2003 7:24 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Passenger Seats Facing Backwards
Replies: 36
Views: 9381

RE: Passenger Seats Facing Backwards

Have flown on Dan Air 1-11s with rearward facing seats and also Branniff Boeing 727s.

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by Trident
Mon Aug 11, 2003 6:41 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: "Airport, 1975" - The Critics Crash It!
Replies: 30
Views: 9188

RE: "Airport, 1975" - The Critics Crash It!

"Airport" I think dates from 1968 and is, in fact, not a bad movie. Don't forget, veteran actress Helen Hayes won an Oscar for best supporting actress for her role in "Airport". The other films belong to a later era and are more in the tradition of the "disaster" movies that enjoyed a brief vogue in...

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by Trident
Mon Jun 02, 2003 7:19 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Transporting Grand Prix Cars
Replies: 16
Views: 2431

RE: Transporting Grand Prix Cars

They are transported by freighter 747s. At one stage Paul Stoddard's former company, European Aviation, was responsible. Stoddard owns the Minardi F1 team. He sold European Aviation over a year ago. F1 cars can easily fit in the hold of a passenger 747/DC-10/MD-11 but it's not the cars that are the ...

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by Trident
Tue May 27, 2003 2:58 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: 50+ Year Old Airlines
Replies: 55
Views: 4782

RE: 50+ Year Old Airlines

Legally, in the UK at least, a name change does not matter. I am a professional accountant and I have performed many "name change" exercises on behalf of client compamies. The original company remnains in existence, with its original Companies House number. When a company is formally liquidated or w...

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by Trident
Tue May 27, 2003 1:27 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: 50+ Year Old Airlines
Replies: 55
Views: 4782

RE: 50+ Year Old Airlines

BDR Rule - you obviously misunderstood me. <acronym title="Bloomington / Normal - Central Illinois Regional (BMI / KBMI), USA - Illinois">BMI</acronym> is just a refinement of a name, as was <acronym title="Air Sicilia (Italy)">BM</acronym>, <acronym title="Stockholm - Bromma (BMA / ESSB), Sweden">B...

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by Trident
Mon May 26, 2003 5:51 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: 50+ Year Old Airlines
Replies: 55
Views: 4782

RE: 50+ Year Old Airlines

When deciding how old an airline is I think it is incorrect to include "ancestor" airlines. Therefore, British Airways was founded, not in 1919, but in April 1974. <acronym title="British Airways">BA</acronym>'s pregenitors were <acronym title="Royal Air Maroc (Morocco)">AT</acronym> & T, Hillman Ai...

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by Trident
Mon Apr 28, 2003 3:28 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Ryanair In The Beginning, What Type Of Airline?
Replies: 15
Views: 6753

RE: Ryanair In The Beginning, What Type Of Airline?

They also leased a Swearingen Metro for a period in 1985. My then boss flew from Dublin to the Isle of Man in it at that time.

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by Trident
Fri Feb 28, 2003 10:36 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Your First 747 Flight!
Replies: 140
Views: 13564

RE: Your First 747 Flight!

Aer Lingus EI-ASJ Dublin - Shannon 1977.

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by Trident
Thu Feb 27, 2003 8:09 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Boeing Aircraft
Replies: 20
Views: 2968

RE: Boeing Aircraft

Boeing 717 = Boeing C-135 and variants. Boeing should not have used this designation for the re-branded MD90 series.

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by Trident
Tue Feb 25, 2003 8:32 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: The RE-Production Of Aircraft
Replies: 10
Views: 2998

RE: The RE-Production Of Aircraft

It IS happenning within the warbird fraternity. Witness the newly built authentic Yak 9 fighters from Russia and the Messerschmitt Me262s being built in Washington state.

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by Trident
Tue Feb 25, 2003 8:18 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Old Terminals That Have Stood The Test Of Time
Replies: 22
Views: 3112

RE: Old Terminals That Have Stood The Test Of Time

Dublin Airport still uses the original art deco terminal from 1941. In the 1970s it was replaced by the then "new" terminal and used as office accommodation instead. As I'm not a regular Dublin vistor these days I'm not sure to what use its being put to now, but it's still standing.

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by Trident
Mon Feb 24, 2003 12:26 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Caribbean Airlines Today's Dinasours?
Replies: 19
Views: 3153

RE: Caribbean Airlines Today's Dinasours?

Becoming extinct like dinosaurs - what do you mean? Being wiped out by an asteroid impact?

Dinosaurs were extremely successful and would still be around today if thi dramatic event had not happened. It's unfair to dinosaurs labelling obsolete individuals or businesses as "dinosaurs"!

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by Trident
Mon Feb 24, 2003 12:22 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Aviation History Topic
Replies: 9
Views: 3386

RE: Aviation History Topic

How about the aviation revolution of the 1930s? That really was a decade where aviation changed forever. The introduction of all metal, retractable undercarriage monoplane airliners, fighters and bombers brought about a quantum leap in capability. If you want to concentrate on the civil/airliner sid...

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by Trident
Sat Feb 08, 2003 11:23 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Best Aircraft Nickname Ever?
Replies: 38
Views: 4594

RE: Best Aircraft Nickname Ever?

Hawker Siddeley Trident 3B - "The Gripper" because of its reluctance to leave the ground.

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by Trident
Fri Feb 07, 2003 12:25 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Space Flight....NOT Routine!
Replies: 18
Views: 2138

RE: Space Flight....NOT Routine!

NASA is a civilian organisation, therefore Shuttle accidents are civilian aircraft accidents. Ergo - they can be discussed on a civilan aviation forum.

Anyway, IT IS an interesting (if sad) topic.

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by Trident
Wed Feb 05, 2003 8:29 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: What's This Aircraft For? (Let L-29 Trainer)
Replies: 6
Views: 3934

RE: What's This Aircraft For? (Let L-29 Trainer)

I think the word "Trainer" gives it away. It was the standard two seat jet trainer in the old Warsaw Pact air forces. Like a lot of former Eastern Bloc warplanes, some have been sold onto the civil market.

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by Trident
Wed Feb 05, 2003 1:43 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: A New Development In The Columbia Aftermath
Replies: 24
Views: 3225

RE: A New Development In The Columbia Aftermath

What's important here is RELATIVE speed. Both the stack and the piece were more or less flying at the same speed. As soon as the piece fell off the tank it would start slowing so the impact may "only" have been in the order of 100 -200 mph. Having said that, it still could have been enough to do suf...

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by Trident
Wed Feb 05, 2003 1:38 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: What Kind Of Aircraft Is This*****
Replies: 9
Views: 4458

RE: What Kind Of Aircraft Is This*****

Sounds like a Fouga Magister to me. Sat inside one of the Irish Army Air Corps ones at Balnonnel in 1977.

Funnily enough, in the early design phase of the Comet airliner, a "V" tail was considered but rejected (in fact a no tail version was also considered).

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by Trident
Tue Feb 04, 2003 9:53 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Space Shuttle Columbia Crisis
Replies: 339
Views: 36477

RE: Space Shuttle Columbia Crisis

Soyuz is the standard Russian manned spacecraft. It first flew into space as long ago as 1967 and evolved out of the earlier Vostok and Voshkod spacecraft. It consists of three sections - a forward spherical section known as the Command Module, a more conical section called the Re-Entry module and a...

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by Trident
Tue Feb 04, 2003 8:52 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Replacement For Space Shuttle?
Replies: 31
Views: 3788

RE: Replacement For Space Shuttle?

Buran is a wreck. Apparently the hangar roof fell in on it recently.

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by Trident
Tue Feb 04, 2003 8:22 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Space Shuttle Enterprise
Replies: 54
Views: 4341

RE: Space Shuttle Enterprise

Mission STS-3 (Columbia) landed at White Sands after 8 days in space on 30 March 1982. The crew were Gordon Fullerton and Jack Lousma. Edwards could not be used because the lake bed ws under water and it was deemed too early in the programme to use the hard runways at either Edwards or KSC.

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by Trident
Tue Feb 04, 2003 8:12 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Replacement For Space Shuttle?
Replies: 31
Views: 3788

RE: Replacement For Space Shuttle?

Proportionally speaking, the US spends far, far less in space research (manned and unmanned) than it did in the 1960s (NASA's peak year for spending, in real terms, was 1966). Is the world a better place as result? Have the "starving millions" dissappeared? Have wars ceased? The US could give up spa...

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by Trident
Mon Feb 03, 2003 8:26 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Nasa Unlikely To Build New Space Shuttle
Replies: 23
Views: 5459

RE: Nasa Unlikely To Build New Space Shuttle

The original plan back in 1977 WAS to refurbish Enterprise for spaceflight. This idea was dropped on cost grounds. The Shuttle Test Article (STA OV-99) was refurbished instead and became Challenger.

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by Trident
Mon Feb 03, 2003 5:54 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Nasa Unlikely To Build New Space Shuttle
Replies: 23
Views: 5459

RE: Nasa Unlikely To Build New Space Shuttle

Salina Chan - spot on with your description as to how the USAF requirements severly altered NASA's original requirements for "their" Shuttle. NASA had spent almost ten years testing Lifting Body designs for future shuttle spacecraft and all that work was virtually ditched once the Air Force insisted...

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by Trident
Mon Feb 03, 2003 4:01 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Space Shuttle Columbia Crisis
Replies: 339
Views: 36477

RE: Space Shuttle Columbia Crisis

There is no way that tiles under the Orbiter can be observed from on board the Shuttle. NASA can use ground based and space based telescopes to photograph the Shuttle. As these are based on classified national security systems, the level of detail observable is never disclosed. However, at last nigh...

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by Trident
Mon Feb 03, 2003 3:55 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Space Shuttle Enterprise
Replies: 54
Views: 4341

RE: Space Shuttle Enterprise

The Shuttle at the Kennedy Space Centre is also a full size mock up. Enterprise is held in reserve for the National Air and Space Museum.

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by Trident
Mon Feb 03, 2003 2:41 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Space Shuttle Enterprise
Replies: 54
Views: 4341

RE: Space Shuttle Enterprise

It was originally intended that Enterprise (c/n OV-100) would be totally refurbished and made space worthy after the drop and glide tests in 1977. Another Shuttle (OV-099) was built as a Static Test Article (STA) and was used for heat and vibration tests in 1978/79. When the costs of getting Enterpr...

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by Trident
Sun Feb 02, 2003 10:46 pm
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Space Shuttle Columbia Crisis
Replies: 339
Views: 36477

RE: Space Shuttle Columbia Crisis

The American people, government and NASA must now decide where they want the manned spaceflight programme to go. Do they just want to comtinue using refurbished orbiters for the next twenty years on low earth orbit missions or are they willing to fund a totally new launch vehicle sytem coupled with ...

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by Trident
Sun Feb 02, 2003 1:11 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Space Shuttle Columbia Crisis
Replies: 339
Views: 36477

RE: Space Shuttle Columbia Crisis

Sky News here in the UK (Fox News in the US) has just stated that the vertical stabiliser (tail fin) broke off. Some of the video footage does show something tumbling and twinkling behind the head of the contrail (the main vehicle) BEFORE the single trail starts to break into multiple trails. If the...

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by Trident
Sun Feb 02, 2003 12:12 am
Forum: Civil Aviation
Topic: Space Shuttle Columbia Crisis
Replies: 339
Views: 36477

RE: Space Shuttle Columbia Crisis

Definitely looks like a vehicle break up at around 200,000. Unfortunately, there will be little hope for the crew - sad. January is not a good month for NASA (the flight was launched mid-Jan).

1967 - Apollo 1 fire
1986 - Challenger
2003 - Columbia

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